Archive for the ‘Assessment’ Category

What happened to practicing wound care basics?

Tuesday, April 30th, 2019

wound care basics

Having been involved in wound care for about 25 years, I have seen many changes in our understanding of wound healing, research evidence and technology.

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

As I hear my students describe common practices today and the many myths of wound care, I’m led to wonder, “What happened to starting with wound care basics for healing?”

A colleague of mine once stated there are basically two fundamentals to healing wounds: a healthy patient and a healthy wound environment. Once those are accomplished, topical treatments will not make that big of a difference.

However, clinicians often cling to some “holy grail” treatment in the form of a dressing or adjunctive modality that will somehow overcome the need to practice solid, evidence-based wound care.

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Legal issues clinicians should know when taking wound care pictures

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

wound care pictures

Regardless of where a wound care professional practices, following the trajectory of a wound is essential to providing the best care.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

In addition to measuring wounds, part of today’s practice sometimes includes taking wound care pictures. The steps involved when photographing wounds depends on your organization’s written policies and procedures.

Some healthcare organizations provide computer-based applications and devices that wound care staff are required to use when taking wound care pictures. These photos are typically uploaded into each patient’s electronic medical record.

Other employers may not provide these tools, however. When this occurs, wound care clinicians may be tempted to use their personal cell phones to take wound photos to monitor the success of their care or share with other clinicians for advice.

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The Head to Toe Search for Wounds

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

A comprehensive skin assessment should look for more than just wounds because many medical problems have telltale signs that are easy to see if you know what to look for.

comprehensive skin assessment

 

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

POA. These three little letters have become very important in wound care because we must document any wounds present on admission (POA). By doing so, we are saying that these wounds began somewhere else—maybe at home, maybe in another care setting, but definitely not while under the present facility’s care. This distinction of origin has great implications both financially and legally.

 

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Lower Extremity Ulcers and Angiosomes

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018

What is an angiosome and how does it relate to wound healing? A grand prize-winning Wild On Wounds poster presenter discusses how angiosomes can help identify patients who need vascular intervention.

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Lower Extremity Ulcers and the Toe Brachial Pressure Index

Friday, January 19th, 2018

To treat patients with lower extremity ulcers, you need to find out if there’s impaired arterial blood flow. For some patients, however, the standard Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) yields misleading results. Fortunately, there’s an easy alternative: the Toe Brachial Pressure Index (TBPI).  Here’s when and how to perform this simple test.

 

Lower Extremity Ulcers and the Toe Brachial Pressure Index

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Wound Care Minute: Wound Assessment Equipment

Friday, July 7th, 2017

What wound assessment equipment do you need? In this short video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan discusses the key items you should gather before you begin.

 

To learn even more tips, view the 1-hour webinar “Wound Assessment” for FREE using the code WCMINUTE. Education credit is available.

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in  Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Clinicians who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification exams through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For details see wcei.net.

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Nine Wound Care Documentation Pitfalls to Avoid

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Lawsuits often are settled out of court because the medical record documentation is not defensible. Incomplete, illogical, and inconsistent records are far too common, so it is important to avoid the common pitfalls.

9 Wound Care Documentation Pitfalls to Avoid

 

After reviewing hundreds of medical charts involved in litigation, I noticed many of the same problems occurring in the wound care documentation over and over again. From New York to Florida to California, it is remarkable how the same inconsistencies, errors, and oversights tend to stymie the defense of a case. The goal of every healthcare practitioner is to have complete, accurate, and timely documentation of the medical care given to each and every patient. Here are nine wound care documentation pitfalls to avoid.

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Wound Care Minute: How to Measure Wounds on a Foot

Friday, April 14th, 2017

In this 90-second video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan explains how to use the clock method to measure foot wounds.

 

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Wound Care Minute: How to Measure Depth of a Wound Covered by Slough or Eschar

Friday, February 17th, 2017

In this 90-second video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan answers a common measurement question: how do you measure wound depth when there’s slough or eschar in the way?

 

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Wound Detective Series: Is It (Or Is It Not) Infected?

Friday, January 13th, 2017

How can you tell if a wound is really infected? Learn how to spot the clues and be a skilled wound investigator.

Is it infected?

 

Are you ready, wound detectives, to tackle a new case? This time, we’re learning how to spot the clues that reveal infection. Remember, the wound will tell us what we need to know, we just have to pay careful attention and know what to look for. After all, treatment depends primarily on our clinical assessment (and then a wound culture, if indicated). Sharpen up those investigative skills, and let’s get to work.

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