Archive for the ‘OSTOMY’ Category

Stomas: What You Need to Know

Friday, January 6th, 2017

There are two main types of stomas, and they both have certain “ideal” characteristics in common. Do you know what they are?

Stomas: What You Need to Know

 

You say potato, I say potahto. You say ostomy, I say … stoma. Huh? Those of us in wound care know that it’s not uncommon to hear the terms ostomy and stoma used interchangeably, even though they have different meanings.

In the WCEI blog, “Let’s Talk Ostomy Types,” we described the types and sub-types of bowel and bladder ostomy surgeries. Now, we’re focusing on an aspect of ostomies that wound care professionals experience directly in practice: the stoma.
 
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Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

Friday, December 30th, 2016

Did you miss any WCEI blogs?  Never fear, we wrap up the year with the topics that were most read, shared, and commented upon.

Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

In 2016, we covered a lot of ground, bringing you straight talk on range of wound care topics, including ostomy care, diabetic wounds, legal issues, assessment tips, and more. Which were readers’ top five favorites? Here’s the run-down.

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10 Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist and fellow ostomate Laura Cox shares her most frequently asked patient questions (and she gives you the answers, too).

Ten Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

photo: Sherry Yates Young/Shutterstock.com

Editor’s note: in her blog series, Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist Laura Cox, Shield HeatlhCare, shares lifestyle tips and information with fellow ostomates. After being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at the age of eighteen, Cox underwent ileostomy surgery in 2011. Today, you can find her one-on-one advice, support and insights at her OstomyLife blog, and on other Shield HealthCare social media sites.

 

In my experience working with a variety of healthcare professionals and patients, I continuously field a variety of questions about ostomies, some of which I hear again and again. And I’m always happy to answer them.

For clinicians working with ostomy surgery patients, it’s important to be armed with helpful information that can be shared in order to help them learn to be more comfortable and confident after surgery. That’s why I’ve compiled the ten most common questions that ostomy patients ask – along with my answers from personal experience. By sharing them within your facility, you can help your patients feel more confident as they heal and regain their independence.

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Let’s Talk Ostomy Types

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

(Adapted from About Ostomies: Ostomy 101 by Shield Healthcare)

A comprehensive guide to the different types of ostomies, including colostomies, ileostomies, and urostomies.

Ostomy Types

Do you know your ostomy types? There are three kinds of bowel or bladder ostomies, and with this handy guide, you can brush up on each one – including the multiple sub-types. But first, let’s cover the basics.

Ostomy Surgery

Ostomy surgery is a surgical operation that redirects body wastes through a new outside opening, called a stoma. The stoma is a new exit point created to divert feces or urine. In some cases, multiple stomas are created to divert both. The term “ostomy” is used interchangeably by patients to refer to their medical condition, their stoma, and/or the appliance used to collect waste.

Intestinal ostomies are most often performed in conjunction with: tumor removal; to permit repair of bowel injuries; congenital defects; or as a last resort, treatment in medically unmanageable cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. Indications for urinary diversion include: tumor removal; congenital or nerve defects; or injuries that take away voluntary bladder control.

Types of Ostomies

There are three types of bowel or bladder ostomies, along with multiple sub-types:

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It’s Complicated! Ostomy Patients and Peristomal Skin

Friday, March 18th, 2016

This overview details the five main categories of peristomal skin complications that wound specialists commonly treat in ostomy patients.

Peristomal Skin Complications

If you’ve worked with ostomy patients for any length of time, you know that maintaining a proper seal can be difficult once the peristomal skin (the skin surrounding a stoma) has been compromised. The resulting complications can drastically reduce an ostomy patient’s quality of life, and lead to social isolation, anxiety, and depression. Additionally, when patients need to change their pouches multiple times per day, it also poses a tremendous financial burden.

Unfortunately, ostomy patients with peristomal skin complications often don’t even recognize that complications they are experiencing are treatable. They simply accept it as part of their new life with a stoma, and forgo seeking help. The good news is that we are in the position to not only learn more about peristomal skin complications, but also help educate our patients so that when they suffer from complications, they know there are solutions.

The Basics

Peristomal skin complications usually fall into one of five categories:

  • mechanical trauma
  • infection
  • chemicals and irritants
  • diseases
  • skin allergens

Of all ostomy patients, ileostomy patients have the most complications. That’s because the output from their stomas (the effluent) is watery and caustic. In fact, peristomal skin complications have been estimated to be as high as 57% for patients with ileostomies, 48% with ileal conduits (from urostomies), and 35% with colostomies.  Incidentally, the rate of complications in colostomy patients is lower because it’s easier to contain stool, which is more solid.

So let’s get specific and take a closer look at each type of peristomal skin complications.

Mechanical Peristomal Skin Trauma

Mechanical trauma results from pressure, friction, or shear. Pressure can result from an ill-fitting ostomy appliance, ostomy belt or convex pouching system. Friction occurs from abrasive cleansing, improper pouching removal techniques, and frequent appliance changes.  The tissue damage can be partial to full thickness.

Peristomal Skin Infections

Peristomal skin is prone to infection from bacteria and fungi.  Two common peristomal infections are candidiasis and folliculitis.

Peristomal Candidiasis

Peristomal Candidiasis

Peristomal Candidiasis – This type of infection is an overgrowth of the fungus Candida Albicans surrounding a fecal or urinary diversion.  Fungi thrive in warmth, moisture and darkness.  So when an ostomy patient experiences perspiration, pouch leakage, denuded skin or prolonged wear time, moisture is added beneath the skin barrier.

Of course, this can provide the perfect environment for fungi to grow.  In addition, some patients are simply more predisposed to peristomal candidiasis because of various conditions such as immunosuppression, diabetes, or antibiotic therapy. Such infections can be found anywhere on peristomal skin, but is most commonly found under the skin barrier or under the pouch where it touches the abdomen.

Folliculitis – This is inflammation and/or infection of superficial hair follicles, resulting in isolated lesions or discoloration right at the follicle site.  It can be caused by chemical irritation, such as the effluent, or physical injury, such as rough shaving of the peristomal skin, ripping off the skin barrier, or friction of hair follicles under the skin barrier.   Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, and pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common bacteria found with folliculitis.  As with candidiasis, patients with diabetes, immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy are more likely to develop this infection.

Chemicals Irritants

Peristomal Irritant Contact Dermatitis – Following ostomy surgery, as many as 50% of patients experience peristomal irritant contact dermatitis, which is an inflammatory reaction to a chemical that results in well-defined erythema, edema, or loss of epidermis.  Papules and vesicles are often present as well.  You may know this condition as peristomal moisture associated dermatitis (as discussed in the WCEI blog, MASD: Know Your Types). The chemical irritant can be soap, solvents, or adhesives, but it is often the patient’s own effluent leaking from a poorly fitting pouch or seal. It’s especially prevalent in ileostomy patients because their stoma output is watery and caustic.

Hyperplasia

Hyperplasia

Hyperplasia – This condition is known by many names: pseudoverrucous lesions; chronic papillomatous dermatitis; hyperkeratosis; granulomas;  pseudo-epithelial hyperplasia; exuberant tissue growth; and proud flesh. It’s the result of prolonged skin exposure to urine and moisture. Typical causes include:

  • a pouch that is cut too large for the stoma
  • patients with high output liquid stool
  • urostomy patients, if the skin is in contact with alkaline urine
  • a stoma that is flush with surrounding skin or retracted

Hyperplasia presents as patches of discolored, thickened epidermis and papules, nodules, or both.

Alkaline encrustations – In your urostomy patients, you may find crystal-like formations on exposed peristomal skin. These crystals are called alkaline encrustations. When you remove the pouching system, the skin may bleed. This condition is associated with hyperplasia (discussed above), alkaline urine and/or concentrated urine that pools on the peristomal skin, renal calculi or kidney stones, and urinary tract infections.

Disease of Peristomal Skin

Pyodermal Gangrenosum

Pyodermal Gangrenosum

Pre-existing skin diseases such as psoriasis, eczema, or seborrheic dermatitis can cause issues in the skin surrounding the stoma.  But sometimes more serious conditions can develop, such as pyoderma gangrenosum (PG), which is an inflammatory, ulcerative autoimmune disease condition. PG begins as pustules and continues to extremely painful ulcers that may become full-thickness and excavate under the skin. Even though it occurs in 50% of ostomy patients with underlying inflammatory bowel diseases (such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), the etiology of peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum remains unknown.

Peristomal Skin Allergens

Peristomal Allergic Contact Dermatitis – Contact skin allergies are fairly common in the population, so it’s not surprising to find that some ostomy patients have allergic reactions to pouching systems, accessories or skin care products. Many patients develop a peristomal contact allergy only after repeated exposure to the offending product, or if they are sensitized to a related cross-reacting substance. Allergic reactions typically include erythema along with itching, papules, vesicles, discoloration, crusting, oozing, or dryness.

Suture Granulomas – Suture granulomas are granulation tissue at the suture skin interface and are a reaction to suture material. These present as scattered, red areas of friable granulation tissue where sutures are present.

Simply Put

Peristomal skin complications not only prevent proper pouching, they undermine the comfort and well-being of our patients. And as always, our mission is to help patients heal and enjoy a higher quality of life whenever possible. By understanding the different types of complications and combining treatment with patient education, we can fulfill that mission tenfold.

To learn more about peristomal skin complications (and earn an education credit while you’re at it), view the WCEI webinar, “Troubleshooting Peristomal Skin Complications.” You’ll find out more specifics about this topic, including clinical characteristics and treatment plans.

What do you think?

Were you already familiar with the five common types of peristomal skin complications? And do you have any particularly challenging cases that relate to ostomy patients and one of these types of complications? We would enjoy hearing all about your clinical experiences regarding this topic. Leave your comments or questions below.

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.

Wild On Wounds Conference Early Registration Savings

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Only_14_days

When you register early, you save $100 and you will have first choice in selecting all conference sessions. The early discount rate expires May 1, 2015.  Register today!

Industry and clinical experts will provide training, product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions.

Join us in Las Vegas, September 2-5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

course_header2WCEI2015_WCC_BUTTON_rev

WOUND CARE CERTIFICATION – This Wound Care Certified (WCC®) course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

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DIABETIC WOUND CERTIFICATION – This Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

WCEI2015_OMS_BUTTON_revOSTOMY CERTIFICATION – This Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DETAILS

 

How To: Creating the seal by making the right choices

Monday, October 13th, 2014
Joy Hooper RN, WOCN, OMS, WCEI Instructor, Medical Craft, LLC, Tifton, GA

Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN, OMS

Ostomy Webinar now available through Wound Care Education Institute®:  This popular session is recorded from the Wild On Wounds National Conference and provides ostomy continuing education credit.

Achieving a leak-proof seal between the skin barrier and the abdominal skin surrounding the stoma is the cornerstone of ostomy management. In this session, Joy Hooper will focus on assessment, interventions, and techniques for choosing the right ostomy products for creating dry surfaces, contour management, securement, and peristomal skin protection. 

Wound Care Education Institute is featuring various webinars on topics from this years’ conference.  TO REGISTER CLICK HERE or visit www.wcei.net/webinars.

 

 

2014 Annual Wild On Wounds, (“WOW”) National Conference Sets Record Attendance

Friday, September 26th, 2014

For Immediate Release – PRN Newswire:

2014 Annual Wild on Wounds, (“WOW”) National Conference

Sets Record Attendance

Plainfield IL – September 29, 2014 The Wound Care Education Institute® (WCEI) successfully completed its largest “Wild on Wounds” (WOW) conference in Las Vegas, NV. WOW is fast becoming the largest fall wound care conference in the United States drawing close to 1,000 clinicians, students and industry professionals to the four day event.   Picture1

WOW is specifically designed to advance the skills and knowledge of healthcare professionals specializing in wound care.  The educational sessions and hands-on workshops help them stay on top of ‘today’s standards of care’ and teaches the latest in wound care treatments and technologies.  “I  was  overwhelmed  by  the  outpouring  of  thanks  and  gratitude  from  the attendees,” said Nancy Morgan, Cofounder of WCEI and WOW.

This conference appropriately themed “Skin is in” was held at the Rio Hotel and Convention Center, September 17-20, 2014. Highlights of the conference included:

  • Close to 1,000 practicing nurses, therapist, physicians and industry professionals who influence wound care decisions from all care environments
  • 50+ basic to advanced educational sessions
  •  20 “How-To” and “Hands-On” programs
  • Renowned speakers and industry experts
  • Live certification courses include Skin and Wound Care, Diabetic Wound Care and Ostomy Management
  • Exhibitor partners
  • Clinical poster presentations
  • Wound Care Certified (WCC®) Outstanding Achievement and Scholarship Awards

WOW 2015

Next year’s WOW conference will be held September 2-5, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV.  If you are interested in receiving more details about WOW 2015 email WCEI at info@wcei.net.

 

About the Wound Care Education Institute

WCEI provides healthcare professionals with ongoing education support and comprehensive online and nationwide onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and

OMS™ national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®).   Website: www.wcei.net

Wild On Wounds National Conference Brings Back the Maggots to Las Vegas!

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014
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This is just one of the sessions you can enjoy at our
National Wound Conference
Session 305 
HANDS ON:
Maggot Debridement Therapy
Dr. Ronald A. Sherman, M.D., M.Sc., D.T.M.H., Director, BioTherapeutics
We are pleased to welcome back Dr. Sherman, leading expert in maggot therapy and currently Chairman of the Board of Directors of the non-profit BioTherapeutics, Education and Research (BTER) Foundation, which supports patient care, education and research in maggot therapy and the symbiotic medicine.
Taught in two sessions, this course will give you the didactic and the practical hands on education on maggot therapy. Learn about the history, current status, mechanisms of action, as well as indications and contraindications for maggot therapy. Then put all that to use when you actually learn the technical aspects of maggot debridement therapy by applying live maggot dressings to mock wounds.
This session has limited seating and fills up fast so don’t wait.
 REGISTRATION INCLUDES:
  • 3 days filled with wound care education
  • 2 days of vendor showcase exhibits
  • Lunch all 3 days with a lunch speaker on day 3
  • Party poolside with a robust buffet and drinks!
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • and MORE!

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NAWCO℠ and WCEI® Attend the UOAA National Conference

Monday, August 12th, 2013

A Memorable Experience at the UOAA National Conference! uoaa_collage
What an awesome time we had!

This was a very different type of National Meeting when compared to others we’ve attended in the past. We met hundreds of Ostomates in all ages, from across the US and internationally. This was the first time we attended the United Ostomy Association of America (UOAA) National Conference and we were greeted with a warm welcome from attendees, clinicians and exhibitors.

Many people stopped by the booth to welcome the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy℠ on their latest certification, the Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS℠) into their community with open arms. In fact, over and over attendees were telling us how “there’s nobody trained that can help me”… “there isn’t enough stoma nurses”… “we are so glad you are doing this”.  They were thrilled to learn that the OMS certification would not only include Nurses but also other disciplines such as Physical Therapist, Physical Therapist Assistant, Occupational Therapist, Physicians and Physician Assistant.

Jennifer Oakley (WCEI Instructor) and I spent our time at the booth talking to each attendee and listening to their stories. This really gave us an intimate up-front personal look into their lives. I have to say not many of the stories we heard were positive. In fact many were straight up nightmares of experiences they each had to endure.  Many times Jennifer and I found ourselves holding back the emotion as their stories were so moving.

This just reinforced to me that we need to get out there and spread the knowledge and time is of the essence!    My wheels were spinning on ideas of what we can do to make an impact nationwide.

It was an honor to attend this year’s UOAA national meeting. We want to thank each and every one of you that welcomed us and shared your story. We at WCEI will continue to pay it forward by educating multidisciplinary clinicians in Ostomy Management!

Nancy Morgan RN, BSN, MBA,WCC, DWC, OMS
WCEI Co-Founder