Archive for the ‘pressure ulcers’ Category

Nurse expert witness impacts pressure injury case

Monday, August 5th, 2019

nurse expert witness

Many of you have provided expert testimony in lawsuits in your own state, or other states, concerning wound care and whether that care was consistent with the applicable standard of care and standards of practice in that situation.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

The following Arizona case — Rasor and Donald Miller, Wife and Husband, v. Northwest Hospital LLC — determined if a wound care nurse expert could testify to the cause of a wound sustained by the plaintiff (patient).

The female patient had open-heart surgery at the hospital and received an intra-aortic balloon pump “threatened through her femoral artery.” This required immobilization of her leg.

The patient was in the ICU for several days and the nursing staff discovered a pressure injury on her coccyx that reached stage IV and required 31 debridement procedures.

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Study: Wound care certified nurses reduce pressure injury rates

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2019

pressure injury

Just how much of an impact do wound care certified (WCC) nurses and other clinicians have on their patients? More than you might imagine.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

A formal study was conducted under the auspices of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) program known as the Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HIIN). The findings of the study revealed a correlation with the presence of onsite WCC staff and a reduction in pressure injury rates for patients.

More than 2.5 million people in the U.S. are affected by pressure injuries, and more than 60,000 patients die each year as a direct result of the condition, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

The HIIN study was funded by a grant program through the CMS using civil monetary penalty funds. These funds are used to support projects that benefit patients and residents of nursing homes with the goal of improving the quality of care they receive.

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Top 6 facts you need to know about pressure injuries today

Monday, May 27th, 2019

pressure injuries

Wound care is an exciting specialty that can sometimes prove challenging.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

With various wound types and multiple wound care products and treatments available, clinicians strive to stay up to date on the best practices to ensure they are providing their patients with the current standard of care.

Managing pressure injuries is one area of wound care that many wound care professionals encounter regularly, as pressure injuries are pervasive across the healthcare continuum.

Whether you work in home health, acute care or long-term care, below are some of the top facts to know about managing pressure injuries today from Don Wollheim, MD, FAPWCA, WCC, DWC.

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Advances in wound care technology lead to bioprinting and more

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

bioprinting

Printing human skin to heal large wounds might sound like something straight out of science fiction, but patients suffering from chronic wounds and pressure ulcers soon might have access to this treatment.

wound care

By Heather Cygan, BA

Scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina have created the first mobile skin bioprinting system, which will allow bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound.

“The unique aspect of this technology is the mobility of the system and the ability to provide on-site management of extensive wounds by scanning and measuring them in order to deposit the cells directly where they are needed to create skin,” Sean Murphy, PhD, a WFIRM assistant professor, said in a news release.

Murphy was the lead author of a paper published earlier this year in Nature’s Scientific Reports journal.

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What happened to practicing wound care basics?

Tuesday, April 30th, 2019

wound care basics

Having been involved in wound care for about 25 years, I have seen many changes in our understanding of wound healing, research evidence and technology.

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

As I hear my students describe common practices today and the many myths of wound care, I’m led to wonder, “What happened to starting with wound care basics for healing?”

A colleague of mine once stated there are basically two fundamentals to healing wounds: a healthy patient and a healthy wound environment. Once those are accomplished, topical treatments will not make that big of a difference.

However, clinicians often cling to some “holy grail” treatment in the form of a dressing or adjunctive modality that will somehow overcome the need to practice solid, evidence-based wound care.

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Case illustrates importance of clear wound care delegation

Friday, April 12th, 2019

delegation

In the following case, the issue of delegation of wound care was the focus of the case.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

A female patient’s doctor ordered home healthcare services after her hospitalization for renal disorders and congestive heart failure. The patient employed a local home healthcare agency to provide skilled nursing care for the patient’s many health problems.

Six months later, the physician discovered his patient had developed four decubitus ulcers, including one on her right hip, which measured 5-1/2 centimeters in diameter and 7-1/2 centimeters deep.

The physician ordered the nurses to clean the wounds regularly and two months after the orders were being carried out, he delegated to the nurses to begin to pack the right hip wound with Betadine gauze.

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Pressure Injuries? (Don’t) Say It Ain’t So!

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Mounting pressure to call pressure injuries (aka pressure ulcers) something else has caused a stir – and clinicians in wound care are feeling the heat. Find out why.

Pressury Injuries - Don't Say It Ain't So

One of the most basic principles of healing a wound is to determine the cause – and then remove it. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But this is easier said than done, as many wounds have similar characteristics, and we don’t always have all the facts at our disposal in order to pinpoint the cause.

Unfortunately, this process has become further – and unnecessarily – complicated, thanks to increasing pressure (no pun intended) on wound clinicians to name a pressure injury something else. See? We told you it was complicated. Here’s what you need to know.

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Pressure Injury (Ulcer) Staging: More Real-World Answers

Friday, April 15th, 2016

More real-world wound care questions and answers relating to pressure injury staging, including slough, debridement and skin breakdown.

More Real-World Pressure Injuries

 

Can’t get enough of pressure injury staging? Neither can we. That’s why we’re excited to present even more questions and answers about this topic, based on what wound clinicians experience out in the field (versus what we might learn from textbooks or in a classroom).

In our first such post – packed with some awesome pressure injury staging questions from the field – we discussed slough, levels of destruction and debridement. Here, you’ll find out more about pressure injury staging as it relates to abrasions, surgical flaps, skin breakdown due to clothing, and more. So here they are – five more tips for staging pressure injuries, based on real questions from clinicians.

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Wound Care News: National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announces a change in terminology

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Breaking Wound Care News

The term “pressure injury” replaces “pressure ulcer” in the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Injury Staging System, according to the NPUAP. The change in terminology more accurately describes pressure injuries to both intact and ulcerated skin. In the previous staging system Stage 1 and Deep Tissue Injury described injured intact skin, while the other stages described open ulcers. This led to confusion because the definitions for each of the stages referred to the injuries as “pressure ulcers”.

In addition to the change in terminology, Arabic numbers are now used in the names of the stages instead of Roman numerals. The term “suspected” has been removed from the Deep Tissue Injury diagnostic label. Additional pressure injury definitions agreed upon at the meeting included Medical Device Related Pressure Injury and Mucosal Membrane Pressure Injury.

CLICK HERE to read the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel’s full press release.

 

 

 

What Stage Is It? Test Your Pressure Injury Staging Skills

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

(updated to reflect the 2016 NPUAP Staging Definitions)

How well do you know your guidelines for staging pressure injuries?  View the slideshow and test yourself!

Note: if you have any difficulties opening the slideshow, CLICK HERE to view it in SlideShare.

Test Your Pressure Injury Staging Skills from Wound Care Education Institute

 

 

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.