Archive for the ‘Wound and Skin Management’ Category

Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Check out these top tips to recognize, treat and prevent malnutrition – and get those patient wounds healing.

 

Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

 

(Adapted from Tips to Recognize, Treat and Prevent Malnutrition by Amy Carrera, MD, RD, CNSC)

Malnutrition in the hospital setting can be more common than you think. In fact, up to half of hospitalized patients are either malnourished or at-risk of malnutrition. And when it comes to wound care, malnutrition can cause a number of complications, including delayed wound healing, infection, and other problems that may lead to hospital readmissions.

Let’s take a closer look at what malnutrition actually is, what happens when patients are malnourished, and some tips to recognize, prevent and treat it.

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10 Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist and fellow ostomate Laura Cox shares her most frequently asked patient questions (and she gives you the answers, too).

Ten Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

photo: Sherry Yates Young/Shutterstock.com

Editor’s note: in her blog series, Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist Laura Cox, Shield HeatlhCare, shares lifestyle tips and information with fellow ostomates. After being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at the age of eighteen, Cox underwent ileostomy surgery in 2011. Today, you can find her one-on-one advice, support and insights at her OstomyLife blog, and on other Shield HealthCare social media sites.

 

In my experience working with a variety of healthcare professionals and patients, I continuously field a variety of questions about ostomies, some of which I hear again and again. And I’m always happy to answer them.

For clinicians working with ostomy surgery patients, it’s important to be armed with helpful information that can be shared in order to help them learn to be more comfortable and confident after surgery. That’s why I’ve compiled the ten most common questions that ostomy patients ask – along with my answers from personal experience. By sharing them within your facility, you can help your patients feel more confident as they heal and regain their independence.

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Wound Detective Series: When Wounds Won’t Heal

Friday, August 12th, 2016

Here’s how wound care detectives can solve the mystery of chronic wounds that fail to heal.

 

Epibole

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this case, our focus is on those chronic wounds that just won’t heal, including epibole (which happens in full thickness wounds). And as we know, this rolled wound edge inhibits healing. But why does this happen with some wounds and not others?

Put on your Wound Detective hat, get out your magnifying glass, and look for the signs and symptoms in your patient’s wound bed, including color, tissue type and odor.

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Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

How do you use hydrogel dressings to keep wounds moist without causing maceration? Very carefully.  

 

Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

 

If you’ve ever taken a long bath or spent an afternoon in a swimming pool, you’re familiar with what happens to your hands and feet: they become soft, white, and wrinkled up like prunes. This is a classic case of maceration, which occurs when skin tissue is exposed to excessive moisture over a period of time.

As clinicians, we regularly treat patients with wounds (which need to be kept moist) that are surrounded by tissue that needs to be kept dry. So knowing how to properly treat the wound without causing maceration makes all the difference in the healing process.
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Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

Monday, June 13th, 2016

If you practice wound care, here’s what you need to know in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury – also known as MARSI.

Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

 

Here’s a quiz for all of you in wound care: how many medical adhesive injuries are reported each year in the United States? The answer is 1.5 million. That’s a lot of skin tears and other painful dermal injuries that might have been prevented.

The good news is that with continued education, we can all help decrease Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury (MARSI). This new descriptor in skin injury is definitely something you need to know.

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Telemedicine, Wound Care and . . . Dracula?

Friday, May 6th, 2016

Find out how telemedicine continues to change wound care (and what you can learn from your favorite cartoon characters).

Telemedicine, Wound Care and ... Dracula

 

What do Dracula, Wile E. Coyote and telemedicine have in common? It’s an intriguing question for sure, and you’ll be able to find out the answer at the Wild on Wounds (WOW) National Conference, to be held Aug. 31 – Sept. 3 in Las Vegas.

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Pressure Injuries? (Don’t) Say It Ain’t So!

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Mounting pressure to call pressure injuries (aka pressure ulcers) something else has caused a stir – and clinicians in wound care are feeling the heat. Find out why.

Pressury Injuries - Don't Say It Ain't So

One of the most basic principles of healing a wound is to determine the cause – and then remove it. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But this is easier said than done, as many wounds have similar characteristics, and we don’t always have all the facts at our disposal in order to pinpoint the cause.

Unfortunately, this process has become further – and unnecessarily – complicated, thanks to increasing pressure (no pun intended) on wound clinicians to name a pressure injury something else. See? We told you it was complicated. Here’s what you need to know.

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Pressure Injury (Ulcer) Staging: More Real-World Answers

Friday, April 15th, 2016

More real-world wound care questions and answers relating to pressure injury staging, including slough, debridement and skin breakdown.

More Real-World Pressure Injuries

 

Can’t get enough of pressure injury staging? Neither can we. That’s why we’re excited to present even more questions and answers about this topic, based on what wound clinicians experience out in the field (versus what we might learn from textbooks or in a classroom).

In our first such post – packed with some awesome pressure injury staging questions from the field – we discussed slough, levels of destruction and debridement. Here, you’ll find out more about pressure injury staging as it relates to abrasions, surgical flaps, skin breakdown due to clothing, and more. So here they are – five more tips for staging pressure injuries, based on real questions from clinicians.

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Moisture Associated Skin Damage: Know Your Type

Friday, March 4th, 2016

Know how to correctly identify these four common types of Moisture Associated Skin Damage (MASD) for best wound care practices.

MASD Categories

 

It might sound reasonable to assume that Moisture Associated Skin Damage (MASD) is the result of, well … moisture. The fact is that it takes more than just moisture to cause MASD, which is the inflammation and erosion of the skin that’s caused by prolonged exposure to various sources of moisture, including, urine, stool, perspiration, wound exudate, mucous, or saliva.  Skin does not break down in water alone.  However, when moisture on the skin is combined with friction, chemical irritants or bacterial/microbial factors, that’s when the real damage occurs.

For effective wound care, clinicians must be able to properly assess MASD from the onset – even if at first the diagnosis isn’t obvious. It all begins with good clue gathering, and knowing the characteristics of each of the four common types.

Identifying MASD

Because moisture on the skin increases skin permeability (which alters pH and cools the tissue), it compromises the barrier function of the skin’s protective acid mantle. This, in turn, makes the skin more susceptible to friction and shearing forces.

Correct MASD identification is critical for treatment, and should begin as soon as initial signs appear. The first step is to conduct a complete skin assessment. Don’t ever assume that you know what’s going on at first glance. Follow the general rule of thumb for any wound expert, and keep looking! Take your time, be methodical, and note the location, texture, moisture level, maceration, denuding and changes in skin color.

Know your type

Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis (IAD)

One of the most common forms of MASD is incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), which is the inflammation of the skin from extended exposure to urine or stool.  You may also know it as perineal dermatitis, irritant dermatitis or diaper rash (in children). The highest-risk patients are those that have both fecal and urinary incontinence.

As mentioned earlier, moisture requires an additional irritant in order to produce MASD. Urine contains ammonia, which increases the skin’s pH and destroys the protective acid mantle.  Adding to the problem, frequent skin cleansing in response to urinary or fecal incontinence can increase the risk of breakdown. Even incontinent briefs can contribute to IAD by causing perspiration in the affected area. Although the briefs pull the actual fluids away, the microclimate remains moist and warm.

So how do you know if it’s IAD? Here are typical characteristics:

  • Found over fatty tissue of the buttocks, perineum, inner thigh and groin (though they can occur over bony prominences).
  • Distributed in a consolidated or patchy formation.
  • Covers diffuse areas, shaped like a mirror image in the skin fold or linear area in the anal cleft.
  • Is superficial or partial thickness in depth. Note: if there’s tissue destruction into the subcutaneous tissue or deeper, it must be staged as a pressure ulcer (for more information, see the WCEI blog “Will the Real Pressure Ulcer Please Stand Up?”)
  • Presents with non-uniform redness in the wound bed, maceration in the surrounding skin and peri-anal redness. No necrosis.
  • Has diffuse and irregular wound margins.

Intertriginous Dermatitis (ITD)

Intertriginous dermatitis, also called intertrigo, is an inflammatory condition of opposing skin surfaces caused by moisture.  You’ll find it in skin folds, such as under the breasts, in the axillary (armpit) area, or inguinal (groin) region. It’s particularly common in obese patients.

Moisture can become trapped in the skin fold, where there is a lack of air circulation.  The excess moisture causes the dead cells in the uppermost layer of the skin (the stratum corneum) to become saturated and then puff up. The result is rough textures (which means they won’t glide very well), and the result is skin-on-skin friction.

Characteristics of ITD:

  • Found in the skin folds.
  • Distributed in a linear, mirror image on each side of the fold
  • Always partial thickness.
  • Presents as mild erythema (redness) that can quickly progress to erosion, oozing, maceration or crusting.
  • Surrounding skin is often macerated and prone to bacterial and fungal infections such as candidiasis.
  • Can be painful, itchy and may produce odor.

It’s important to realize that a patient can suffer from both IAD and ITD at the same time, coexisting side-by-side.

Periwound Moisture-Associated Dermatitis

Periwound moisture-associated dermatitis occurs when the skin adjacent to a chronic wound becomes exposed to exudate or toxins from bacteria in the wound bed, causing inflammation and erosion. This is a result of too much exudate that hasn’t been properly managed. Left untreated, the periwound will eventually break down and the wound will enlarge.

Infected wounds are especially prone to periwound moisture-associated dermatitis because they produce more exudate.  The condition is more common in the elderly and immunocompromised, but our clinical practices can contribute as well. This can be due to a number of risk factors, including improper dressing selection, infrequent dressing changes, and aggressive tape removal.

Peristomal Moisture-Associated Dermatitis

The final common type of MASD is peristomal moisture-associated dermatitis.  This form of inflammation and skin erosion occurs only in ostomy patients.  It begins at the stoma/skin junction, and can extend outward as much as 4 inches in any direction.  As many as 50% of patients with a stoma experience this condition, which can be extremely detrimental to their quality of life.

Peristomal moisture-assisted dermatitis can happen around any stoma, including tracheostomies, gastrostomies, urostomies, and colostomies.  However, ileostomy patients – those with stomas at the small intestine – have the highest risk since the effluent (output from the stoma) is watery and caustic.  When the pouching system leaks due to improper sizing, an uneven peristomal plane or incorrect wear time, the effluent causes skin irritation and potential breakdown.

Pay close attention to the area around the stoma, keeping a close eye out for potential problems, including well-defined erythema, edema, and loss of the epidermis. You may also see papules, vesicles, itching, crusting and oozing. As with other forms of MASD, it’s important to address the problem early.

Do you know your MASD types?

What types of MASD have you encountered the most in your facility, and have you ever had trouble identifying them? Do you have any tips for MASD identification, and has early identification made a difference in patient outcome? Please tell us about your experiences by leaving your comments below.

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.

Wound Assessment: Skin of Many Colors

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Understanding the structural differences between light and dark skin is crucial for clinicians, and this free Wild on Wounds webinar will help – plus you’ll get awesome tips for assessing skin of color.

Wound Assessment: Skin of Many Colors

 

Chances are that when you studied skin and wound assessment in US textbooks, most of the case studies or photos involved patients with lighter skin tones – common to people of European decent.  Historically (and unfortunately), there’s been a lack of research, guidelines and consistency in treating skin of color.

This lack of diversity in educational resources can be downright dangerous. For example, without exposure to proper techniques, you might not recognize a Stage 1 pressure injury in a darker-skinned patient, because non-blanchable erythema (redness) is harder to see.

With the diverse US patient population, it is critical that clinicians understand how skin differs among people of various races and ethnicities. Knowing these differences is  essential for skin and wound assessment.

Learning starts here

Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Co-founder/ Clinical Instructor

Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Co-founder/ Clinical Instructor

Most of us have learned whatever we can about treating skin of color from our own experiences in the field. To remedy this, WCEI Co-founder and Clinical Instructor Nancy Morgan addressed this topic in her Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference presentation, “How to: Skin of Color.”

Now offered as an on-demand webinar, Morgan discusses the specific characteristics of skin of color. She explains clinical conditions present differently in highly pigmented (versus lighter) skin. You can hear her entire presentation – and view it for free – with a special coupon code (listed below).

What makes skin darker?

Skin color is the result of melanin – a brown pigment. The purpose of melanin is to protect the skin by absorbing harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.  As we encounter UV rays, special cells called melanocytes produce additional melanin.

You may be surprised to learn that there’s no difference in the number of melanocytes between skin types. The palest and the darkest person will, on average, have the same number of these cells in their skin. However, the production and concentration of melanin in the epidermis (top layer of skin) is double in darker skin.

Does skin tone matter?

There are many skin tone classification scales used in the field, created mostly by and for dermatologists.  As Morgan states in her presentation, these scales aren’t helpful when it comes to wound care. “We have to do a very thorough visual inspection of the skin, and we have to talk to the patient about his or her baseline skin color.”

More webinar highlights

Besides exploring the basics of skin color and tone, you’ll find out more from Morgan’s webinar, including:

  • Skin conditions more common in darker skin, such as hyperpigmentation, keloid scarring, and xerosis.
  • Useful tips for performing a holistic assessment of a patient with dark skin.
  • Why some clinical conditions – such as sDTI, erythema or cyanosis – can be much more difficult to pick up in skin of color.
  • How other conditions, such as hemosiderin staining, may appear very different than they would in a patient with lighter skin.

Get your free webinarFree Webinar - Skin of Color

Are you ready to learn more about this topic and better address the wound care needs of your patients with dark skin?  Click here and use the code BLOG to access this 60-minute recording, which qualifies for an education credit.

More thoughts?

We’d love to know about your clinical experiences with skin of color. Did you receive any official training regarding this topic, or have you mostly learned from your own personal experiences? Is your facility proactive in making sure clinicians are knowledgeable in how skin tone and color effect proper wound assessment? Tell us about your observations and experiences by leaving your comments below.

 

Wild on Wounds℠ (WOW) is the national wound conference designed for healthcare professionals that are interested in enhancing their knowledge in skin and wound management. Clinicians come from all over the US to see, touch and participate in our hands-on workshops. They also learn about all the new and advanced wound care treatments and technologies to better help care for their patients.  For more information visit www.woundseminar.com