Archive for the ‘Wound and Skin Management’ Category

5 common myths debunked about nutrition for wound healing

Tuesday, March 26th, 2019

nutrition for wound healing

Wound care clinicians work diligently to find the most relevant products while using the latest evidence-based treatments to provide the best patient care.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

For optimum wound healing to occur there is another important factor – a nutritious diet.

Proper nutrition for wound healing includes a diet with the right number of calories, vitamins, minerals and nutrients necessary to maintain skin integrity and promote wound healing.

To learn more about nutrition for wound healing, we spoke with Julie Stefanski, MEd, RDN, CSSD, LDN, CDE, FAND, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and content writer for food, nutrition and dietetics at Relias Healthcare, about five of the most common myths regarding nutrition and wounds.

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Case studies confirm effectiveness of honey for wound care

Thursday, March 21st, 2019

hone for wound care

When durable medical equipment Manuka honey isn’t available to treat a chronic wound, can over-the-counter (OTC) honey products serve as an effective substitute? Poster presenters from the 2018 Wild On Wounds national conference looked for evidence in two case studies.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Despite rapid developments in new wound care technology, clinicians are turning to an ancient approach to speed healing and control bioburden: honey.

As early as 3,000 BC, Egyptians and other civilizations relied on honey as a topical wound treatment. With the discovery of antibiotics, however, honey quickly fell out of favor.

As antibiotic resistance drives the search for alternatives today, therapeutic honey enjoys renewed attention from researchers.

Is Manuka honey the only effective option?

Most of the studies on medicinal honey focus on durable medical equipment products, which typically contain honey extracted from the nectar of a Manuka tree.

Based on the evidence, medical-grade Manuka honey has gained esteem among wound care professionals for its increased antimicrobial action compared to other types of honey. Studies also suggest medical-grade Manuka honey contains compounds that jump-start stalled wounds, reduce odor and accelerate healing.

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What do I need to know about professional liability insurance for nurses?

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

professional liability insurance for nurses

One of our members submitted a question about what type of professional liability insurance for nurses she should purchase, especially since she is now certified in wound care.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

Questions about professional liability insurance are constantly raised by nurses in all areas of nursing practice.

Wound care nurses are no exception, and this topic was briefly covered in on our blog titled Wound Consulting Business: How to Get Started.

There is a great deal of important information for you to know as a wound care nurse before selecting a professional liability policy.

Before discussing that information, it is important to emphasize that as a practicing wound care nurse, you need to purchase your own professional liability insurance policy.

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Sacral Wounds and Diarrhea Don’t Mix, Part 2

Monday, October 15th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Frequent bouts of diarrhea make it difficult to care for wounds on the sacrum or coccyx, and healing often is impeded because of fecal contamination.

 

 

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Sacral Wounds and Diarrhea Don’t Mix, Part 1

Wednesday, September 12th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Frequent bouts of diarrhea make it difficult to care for wounds on the sacrum or coccyx, and healing often is impeded because of fecal contamination.

 

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The Head to Toe Search for Wounds

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

A comprehensive skin assessment should look for more than just wounds because many medical problems have telltale signs that are easy to see if you know what to look for.

comprehensive skin assessment

 

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

POA. These three little letters have become very important in wound care because we must document any wounds present on admission (POA). By doing so, we are saying that these wounds began somewhere else—maybe at home, maybe in another care setting, but definitely not while under the present facility’s care. This distinction of origin has great implications both financially and legally.

 

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Top WCEI Blogs of 2017

Friday, December 29th, 2017

We’re excited to launch a new year of wound care topics. But first, we’re looking back at the WCEI blogs you liked best in 2017. Here are the year’s most read (and often most shared and discussed) posts. 

[Click on the title or image to read the full post.]

1. Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

What should wound care professionals do when a physician orders wet-to-dry dressings? Be prepared and know the facts.

Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

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Acetic Acid or Dakin’s Solution in Wound Care: Am I Doing This Right?

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

How and when do you use two common topical antiseptics, acetic acid and Dakin’s solution? We help clear up the confusion. 

Acetic Acid or Dakin’s Solution in Wound Care: Am I Doing This Right?

 

In wound care, we now recognize that antibiotics – and their overuse –  contribute to bacterial resistance. With so many antibiotics losing their effectiveness, clinicians have turned to antiseptics that are bactericidal (kill bacteria) or bacteriostatic (inhibit bacteria growth) to cleanse and treat infected wounds.

At WCEI®, we receive a lot of questions about two popular antiseptics:  acetic acid and Dakin’s solution (sodium hypochlorite).  Both boast a broad range of effectiveness. Neither is new or cutting-edge. The early Egyptians treated wounds with acetic acid.  World War I clinicians successfully used sodium hypochlorite to avoid amputations due to infection. Yet, despite these long histories, we find that today’s clinicians are confused about how to use them. When should we choose these treatments and how do we use them to prepare and dress the wound?

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Wound Detective Series: Is It (Or Is It Not) Infected?

Friday, January 13th, 2017

How can you tell if a wound is really infected? Learn how to spot the clues and be a skilled wound investigator.

Is it infected?

 

Are you ready, wound detectives, to tackle a new case? This time, we’re learning how to spot the clues that reveal infection. Remember, the wound will tell us what we need to know, we just have to pay careful attention and know what to look for. After all, treatment depends primarily on our clinical assessment (and then a wound culture, if indicated). Sharpen up those investigative skills, and let’s get to work.

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Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

Friday, December 30th, 2016

Did you miss any WCEI blogs?  Never fear, we wrap up the year with the topics that were most read, shared, and commented upon.

Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

In 2016, we covered a lot of ground, bringing you straight talk on range of wound care topics, including ostomy care, diabetic wounds, legal issues, assessment tips, and more. Which were readers’ top five favorites? Here’s the run-down.

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