Archive for the ‘Wound and Skin Management’ Category

Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Even the best wound care detectives are challenged by this sneaky culprit that delays healing. Here’s how to identify biofilm bacteria and solve the case.

Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this wound-care case, we will try to find and invade the elusive biofilm bacterial hide-out. So the questions are: where are those microbes holed up, how do I know if they are even there, and how do I get rid of them?

Put on your Wound Detective hat – this one’s going to be tough. Even with your trusty magnifying glass, it’s not easy to spot the signs and symptoms of biofilm in your patients’ wounds.

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Cancer Patient’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Clearing drainage tubes for patients has gotten easier, thanks to a breast cancer patient’s husband and his invention, Tube-Evac.

Cancer Survivor’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

 

Clearing surgical tubes is a common procedure in wound care, and it often comes as second-nature for clinicians. But it can still be time-consuming and complicated. So imagine how daunting and difficult it is for friends or family members who have never done such a thing, and are responsible for a loved one’s after-surgery care.

Thanks to a loving and very creative husband, there is now a product available that makes the process of clearing tubes easier and faster. It’s called Tube-Evac, and we are happy to share its story.

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Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Check out these top tips to recognize, treat and prevent malnutrition – and get those patient wounds healing.

 

Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

 

(Adapted from Tips to Recognize, Treat and Prevent Malnutrition by Amy Carrera, MD, RD, CNSC)

Malnutrition in the hospital setting can be more common than you think. In fact, up to half of hospitalized patients are either malnourished or at-risk of malnutrition. And when it comes to wound care, malnutrition can cause a number of complications, including delayed wound healing, infection, and other problems that may lead to hospital readmissions.

Let’s take a closer look at what malnutrition actually is, what happens when patients are malnourished, and some tips to recognize, prevent and treat it.

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10 Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist and fellow ostomate Laura Cox shares her most frequently asked patient questions (and she gives you the answers, too).

Ten Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

photo: Sherry Yates Young/Shutterstock.com

Editor’s note: in her blog series, Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist Laura Cox, Shield HeatlhCare, shares lifestyle tips and information with fellow ostomates. After being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at the age of eighteen, Cox underwent ileostomy surgery in 2011. Today, you can find her one-on-one advice, support and insights at her OstomyLife blog, and on other Shield HealthCare social media sites.

 

In my experience working with a variety of healthcare professionals and patients, I continuously field a variety of questions about ostomies, some of which I hear again and again. And I’m always happy to answer them.

For clinicians working with ostomy surgery patients, it’s important to be armed with helpful information that can be shared in order to help them learn to be more comfortable and confident after surgery. That’s why I’ve compiled the ten most common questions that ostomy patients ask – along with my answers from personal experience. By sharing them within your facility, you can help your patients feel more confident as they heal and regain their independence.

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Wound Detective Series: When Wounds Won’t Heal

Friday, August 12th, 2016

Here’s how wound care detectives can solve the mystery of chronic wounds that fail to heal.

 

Epibole

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this case, our focus is on those chronic wounds that just won’t heal, including epibole (which happens in full thickness wounds). And as we know, this rolled wound edge inhibits healing. But why does this happen with some wounds and not others?

Put on your Wound Detective hat, get out your magnifying glass, and look for the signs and symptoms in your patient’s wound bed, including color, tissue type and odor.

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Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

How do you use hydrogel dressings to keep wounds moist without causing maceration? Very carefully.  

 

Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

 

If you’ve ever taken a long bath or spent an afternoon in a swimming pool, you’re familiar with what happens to your hands and feet: they become soft, white, and wrinkled up like prunes. This is a classic case of maceration, which occurs when skin tissue is exposed to excessive moisture over a period of time.

As clinicians, we regularly treat patients with wounds (which need to be kept moist) that are surrounded by tissue that needs to be kept dry. So knowing how to properly treat the wound without causing maceration makes all the difference in the healing process.
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Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

Monday, June 13th, 2016

If you practice wound care, here’s what you need to know in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury – also known as MARSI.

Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

 

Here’s a quiz for all of you in wound care: how many medical adhesive injuries are reported each year in the United States? The answer is 1.5 million. That’s a lot of skin tears and other painful dermal injuries that might have been prevented.

The good news is that with continued education, we can all help decrease Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury (MARSI). This new descriptor in skin injury is definitely something you need to know.

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Telemedicine, Wound Care and . . . Dracula?

Friday, May 6th, 2016

Find out how telemedicine continues to change wound care (and what you can learn from your favorite cartoon characters).

Telemedicine, Wound Care and ... Dracula

 

What do Dracula, Wile E. Coyote and telemedicine have in common? It’s an intriguing question for sure, and you’ll be able to find out the answer at the Wild on Wounds (WOW) National Conference, to be held Aug. 31 – Sept. 3 in Las Vegas.

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Pressure Injuries? (Don’t) Say It Ain’t So!

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Mounting pressure to call pressure injuries (aka pressure ulcers) something else has caused a stir – and clinicians in wound care are feeling the heat. Find out why.

Pressury Injuries - Don't Say It Ain't So

One of the most basic principles of healing a wound is to determine the cause – and then remove it. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But this is easier said than done, as many wounds have similar characteristics, and we don’t always have all the facts at our disposal in order to pinpoint the cause.

Unfortunately, this process has become further – and unnecessarily – complicated, thanks to increasing pressure (no pun intended) on wound clinicians to name a pressure injury something else. See? We told you it was complicated. Here’s what you need to know.

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Pressure Injury (Ulcer) Staging: More Real-World Answers

Friday, April 15th, 2016

More real-world wound care questions and answers relating to pressure injury staging, including slough, debridement and skin breakdown.

More Real-World Pressure Injuries

 

Can’t get enough of pressure injury staging? Neither can we. That’s why we’re excited to present even more questions and answers about this topic, based on what wound clinicians experience out in the field (versus what we might learn from textbooks or in a classroom).

In our first such post – packed with some awesome pressure injury staging questions from the field – we discussed slough, levels of destruction and debridement. Here, you’ll find out more about pressure injury staging as it relates to abrasions, surgical flaps, skin breakdown due to clothing, and more. So here they are – five more tips for staging pressure injuries, based on real questions from clinicians.

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