Archive for the ‘WOW Conference’ Category

How to persuade clinicians to change a wound care order

Tuesday, July 9th, 2019

wound care order

How can you convince an ordering clinician to consider a more effective wound treatment? Psychology offers some clues.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

If you’re a knowledgeable, certified wound care clinician, receiving an outdated or illogical wound care order can be frustrating.

So, what can you do when you’re tasked with administering treatments you believe will be ineffective or harmful to a patient?

First, practicing substandard wound care can land you in legal hot water, even if you are following orders.

To protect your license, reputation and financial well-being, you need to speak up about wound care orders that contradict your knowledge and training.

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Home health nurse shares wound care certification journey

Wednesday, April 10th, 2019

wound care certification

What does it mean to be a leader in wound care? It’s about being a credible resource for care decisions based on the evidence, which wound care certification achieves.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

It’s about focusing on what you can do, big or small, to make things better for your patients, team and organization.

Every day, thousands of our Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) alumni lead in this way with wound care certification.

If you participate in our alumni-only Facebook Group called “Wound Care Rocks,” you might recognize Trisha Dubois, RN, WCC, OMS, as a clinician who demonstrates those leadership qualities. She’s eager to learn from other certified clinicians in our group.

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Why our 2019 Wild on Wounds conference will WOW you

Thursday, March 28th, 2019

Wild on Wounds

As a wound care clinician you have a passion for your work. It’s this passion that drives you to learn about the latest evidence-based findings on the most effective treatments and products you can use on your patients.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

At the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI), we offer two strategies to help you achieve clinical excellence in wound care by attending our Wild on Wounds (WOW) national wound conference and taking our wound care classes.

Wild on Wounds (WOW) is an annual conference created for clinicians who practice skin and wound management.

This year’s event is Sept. 11-14 at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel. The curriculum at WOW is designed in a format that’s relevant for all types of clinicians involved in skin and wound management, said Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, co-founder and clinical consultant with WCEI.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re a physical therapist, a nurse, an occupational therapist or a physician, our WOW conference, as well as our WCEI courses, support all types of clinicians at different levels of learning,” Morgan said.

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Case studies confirm effectiveness of honey for wound care

Thursday, March 21st, 2019

hone for wound care

When durable medical equipment Manuka honey isn’t available to treat a chronic wound, can over-the-counter (OTC) honey products serve as an effective substitute? Poster presenters from the 2018 Wild On Wounds national conference looked for evidence in two case studies.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Despite rapid developments in new wound care technology, clinicians are turning to an ancient approach to speed healing and control bioburden: honey.

As early as 3,000 BC, Egyptians and other civilizations relied on honey as a topical wound treatment. With the discovery of antibiotics, however, honey quickly fell out of favor.

As antibiotic resistance drives the search for alternatives today, therapeutic honey enjoys renewed attention from researchers.

Is Manuka honey the only effective option?

Most of the studies on medicinal honey focus on durable medical equipment products, which typically contain honey extracted from the nectar of a Manuka tree.

Based on the evidence, medical-grade Manuka honey has gained esteem among wound care professionals for its increased antimicrobial action compared to other types of honey. Studies also suggest medical-grade Manuka honey contains compounds that jump-start stalled wounds, reduce odor and accelerate healing.

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Wild On Wounds: It’s a Wrap!

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

Wound Care Rocks: a wrap-up of 2016 Wild On Wounds (WOW) National Conference in Las Vegas.

Wild On Wounds 2016: It’s a Wrap!

Wound Care Rocks was the theme as clinicians gathered from all over the world for the 2016 Wild On Wounds (WOW) National Conference in Las Vegas. The goal? To keep up with current standards of care and learn from the best with 42 didactic and interactive sessions.

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Not Yo’ Grandma’s Stockings

Friday, May 27th, 2016

By Christopher Miles, OT, CLT, CWCA, medi USA

Compression garments aren’t what they used to be – and those of us in wound care couldn’t be happier.                                      Not Yo' Grandma's Stockings

Unfortunately, when patients think of compression garments they think of socks that are too tight and difficult to get on, or tend to roll and pinch. What they might not be thinking is that compression therapy is practically the only medical treatment likely to reduce the rate of recurrence of their nasty, painful and smelly venous leg ulcers.

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Maggots and Wound Care: The Not-So-Odd Couple

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

The use of maggots in wound care is making a comeback – in the form of maggot debridement therapy – and wound clinicians can’t wait to talk about it.

Maggots and Wound Care

 

Most people don’t get too excited about maggots. In fact, the mere mention of legless larvae surely triggers gag responses and/or skin crawling in millions of non-healthcare citizens everywhere. But that’s definitely not the case for those of us in wound care.

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Telemedicine, Wound Care and . . . Dracula?

Friday, May 6th, 2016

Find out how telemedicine continues to change wound care (and what you can learn from your favorite cartoon characters).

Telemedicine, Wound Care and ... Dracula

 

What do Dracula, Wile E. Coyote and telemedicine have in common? It’s an intriguing question for sure, and you’ll be able to find out the answer at the Wild on Wounds (WOW) National Conference, to be held Aug. 31 – Sept. 3 in Las Vegas.

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You Can Do It! Five Steps to Become a WOW Poster Presenter

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

You’re only five steps away from taking your wound case to Las Vegas as a Wild On Wounds poster presenter.

You Can Do It! 5 Steps to Present Your Wound Care Poster at the WOW Conference

 

Whether you’re a first-time attendee or a seasoned conference goer, nothing compares to the experience of attending the annual Wild on Wounds (WOW) National Conference. Not only are there plenty of options for academic- and research-oriented clinicians, this event also provides real-world wound care education, networking and solutions for professionals who treat wound patients at the bedside. It also provides a great opportunity for individuals who have experienced a particularly challenging or interesting wound care case to share what they have learned in a poster presentation.

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Destination WOW? Be a Poster Presenter

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

A Wild on Wounds conference attendee shares a wound-care mystery through her prize-winning poster abstract, and has a message for fellow clinicians facing recalcitrant wounds: “Don’t give up!”

Susie Lee, RN WCC, was the 2015 WOW Grand Prize recipient in the poster presentations.

Susie Lee, RN WCC, was the 2015 WOW Grand Prize recipient in the poster presentations.

Susie Lee, RN WCC, traveled from Honolulu, Hawaii last year to attend the Wild on Wounds National Conference (WOW) for the first time, and all because of a challenging wound care case. A nurse for 38 years (and specializing in wound care for the past 10 years), she submitted a poster abstract in order to share her experience with fellow clinicians and conference attendees.

At the time, Susie had never created a clinical poster before, let alone one of such magnitude. And on top of that, she had never been asked to present a case for such a large audience. But this opportunity was a perfect fit for WOW attendees, because they love learning and finding ways to better help and care for wound care patients.

Little did she know that her entry (and all the hard work that went with it) would not only be a smashing success, she would go on to receive the coveted Grand Prize, plus a complimentary conference registration for the following year’s conference. The icing on the cake was that she enjoyed learning more about her passion – wound care – in a lively, fun and inspirational environment while attending the WOW conference.

The Case

So what was Lee’s poster topic? It all started with an old wound that refused to heal. Located around a patient’s colostomy site, the wound was a tricky one, accompanied by intermittent appliance leakage. But the kicker? The patient wasn’t feeling pain.

“It was so frustrating,” says Lee. “The wound would get better for months at a time, but then suddenly flare up again. After trying different methods of treatment, none of which seemed to work I researched symptoms and scoured the Internet, looking for related articles, photos and any clue that might help find a solution. A  dermatologist could not provide any diagnosis, so I finally consulted with another wound care nurse colleague.”

Again, since the patient wasn’t feeling any pain, it was more difficult to diagnose. But finally Lee experienced an aha moment. She learned that the patient had suffered from a stroke on her left side (where the colostomy was), which had caused extensive nerve damage. This suddenly explained the patient’s lack of pain.

The diagnosis? Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum – a rare condition that causes large, painful ulcers to develop in the area surrounding an abdominal stoma. Working with a nurse practitioner, Lee decided to apply a high-dose of topical steroid cream. And guess what? It worked.

The WOW Experience

Although Lee’s case was difficult, the successful outcome – and the opportunity to share her story so that others might learn from it – inspired her to create the first poster presentation of her life. Being named the Grand Prize recipient was a surprise, for sure. But it was her message that meant even more. “The bottom line for me was to tell other clinicians that no matter how long it takes, don’t give up!” she says. “It’s such a great satisfaction to get a stubborn wound healed – for the patient, certainly, but also for you!”

Attending her first WOW conference was extra special because Lee’s daughter came with her to see the presentation. “It was kind of a role reversal,” she says. “My daughter came to see me participate in something. She was impressed with my poster, and it was nice for her to be proud of me, just like I’m always proud of her!”

As for her WOW trip, Lee says that she loved every minute. “I’ve been to other conferences, and they were really nice, but WOW is a whole other experience,” she says. “They had so many sessions and resources – on topics that I have to deal with every day. I met so many great people, and it was well worth the trip. WOW makes learning fun.”

A Little Background on Susie

Lee’s first class with the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) was in 2004, when she completed the Skin and Wound Management course presented by Nancy Morgan, WCEI Co-Founder.  Later, she sat for the Wound Care Certified Examination provided by National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy, and then became a WCC. “No doubt about it, my career path is a direct result of WCEI,” she says.

More about WOW

What have your experiences at WOW conferences been, and how many times have you attended? What were your favorite moments, sessions or experiences? Please leave your comments below. And if you’re interested in sharing the details of an unusual or particularly challenging case, get your online poster submission form here. We can’t wait to see you in Las Vegas!

To learn more about the case, “Atypical Presentation of Peristomal Pyoderma Gangrenosum,”  see Lee’s article in the Jan/Feb 2016 issue of Wound Care Advisor.