Wound Consulting Business: How to Get Started

August 18th, 2017

It’s time to make your wound consulting business a reality. Here’s what you need to know.

Wound Consulting - Getting Started

 

So, you’ve been thinking about starting that wound care business you’ve always dreamed about. What’s next?

First of all, start by taking a look at Wound Consulting Business: Do You Have What It Takes?, to see what factors you should consider before taking the plunge. It’ll help you decide if you’re cut out to be your own boss. Then, if you still think being a wound consultant is for you, let’s talk about getting started.

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Three Common Reasons You Might Get Sued

August 11th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Patients often sue for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the medical care rendered, but rather for the human care that is perceived as lacking.

Three Common Reasons You Might Get Sued

 

The last few weeks were very difficult for my family and friends in the medical sense. I had one family member in an intensive care unit on the West Coast, one friend’s father in a rehab facility on the East Coast, and one friend’s son having problems in the outpatient setting in the Midwest. These patients are male and female, young and old, and have very different medical histories, but they all have one thing in common. They all want to sue about their medical care or lack thereof. These cases illustrate three common reasons you might get sued. Let’s take a closer look at what has gone wrong for each patient.

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Wound Consulting Business: Do You Have What It Takes?

July 28th, 2017

Thinking about starting your own wound care business or becoming a wound consultant? Here’s what you need to know.

Wound Consulting Business: Do You Have What It Takes?

 

(Editor’s note: this is Part One of a two-part series on starting your own wound consulting business. Part Two will explore how to get started.)

Being a wound consultant is a dream for so many clinicians. It can be exciting and rewarding to start a wound care business, but it can also be overwhelming, confusing and risky. So before you take the plunge, here are some serious questions and factors to consider.

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Venous vs. Arterial Ulcers: What’s the Difference?

July 21st, 2017

How can you remember the difference between venous vs. arterial ulcers? Visualization is a good place to start.

Venous vs. Arterial: What’s the Difference?

 

One of the most basic lessons in wound care education is learning the characteristics of venous vs. arterial ulcers – and being able to tell the difference between the two. It can be downright tricky – especially for new clinicians. Fortunately, we have a handy technique for remembering what to look for. And it all starts with visualizing what causes the wound in the first place.

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Nutrition and Wounds: The View From Both Sides

July 14th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Nutrition is frequently conjoined to wound care lawsuits because patients often lose weight, so it is important to thoroughly document nutrition interventions and education.

 Nutrition and Wounds

 

Most pressure injury lawsuits begin as just that—a lawsuit initiated because of an acquired pressure injury. Usually the wound in question never healed to closure, became infected, led to an amputation, or otherwise caused the patient suffering. During the legal discovery process, all sorts of other care issues come to light, and the scope of the lawsuit grows. One of the most common additional issues is the patient’s nutritional status. Let’s look at it from both sides.

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Wound Care Minute: Wound Assessment Equipment

July 7th, 2017

What wound assessment equipment do you need? In this short video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan discusses the key items you should gather before you begin.

 

To learn even more tips, view the 1-hour webinar “Wound Assessment” for FREE using the code WCMINUTE. Education credit is available.

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in  Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Clinicians who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification exams through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For details see wcei.net.

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Top Tips for Best Wound Cleansing Practices

June 30th, 2017

Are your wound cleansing practices up-to-date? Find out with these top tips for cleaning wounds properly and choosing the right cleansers.

Top Tips for Best Wound Cleansing Practices

 

When you get clinicians together to talk about wounds, dressing choices are usually a popular topic. Wound cleansing? Not so much.

Cleaning a wound thoroughly – and frequently – is a crucial part of wound care. In fact, you should clean a wound every time you change a dressing – unless it’s contraindicated. Why is it so important? Cleaning a wound:

  • removes loose debris and planktonic (free-floating) bacteria.
  • provides protection to promote an optimal environment for healing.
  • facilitates wound assessment by optimizing visualization of the wound.

So, how do you know if your wound cleansing practices are up-to-date? It all comes down to choosing the appropriate cleansers and cleaning the wound using the correct wound cleaning technique.

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We’ve Always Done It This Way: Flagyl Crushing & Other Wound Care Bad Habits

June 23rd, 2017

Off-label drug use and questionable documentation are just two wound care bad habits that can get clinicians into trouble. Don’t just accept it because “We’ve Always Done It This Way” .

Wound Care Bad Habits

 

 

As clinicians, we use our knowledge, training and experience to find solutions and take care of patients in the best way possible. We learn about standards of care, scope of practice, and facility policies and procedures to guide our actions and care-giving.

There are several outdated common practices and treatments, however, that continue to surprise us. While there are plenty examples to talk about, let’s cover some of the issues most often brought to our attention.

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Pressure Injuries and Medical Device Dilemmas

June 16th, 2017

Medical device-related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) are a standard part of wound care, but preventative practices can make a big difference.

Medical Device-Related Pressure Injuries

 

One of the first things clinicians learn about treating pressure injuries is to find the cause of the pressure and simply remove it. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But what do you do when the cause of the pressure injury is a medical device which is not only necessary, but literally sustaining a patient’s life?

While some medical device-related pressure injuries are unavoidable, there are things clinicians can do to relieve the pressure and heal the injury. Here’s what you need to know.

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Truth or Consequences: Admitting Your Wound Care Program Needs Improvement

June 9th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Some healthcare providers are working in underperforming facilities, and they need to discuss how to improve outcomes before it becomes a matter of legal record.

Truth or Consequences: Admitting Your Wound Care Program Needs Improvement

 

“I didn’t have any special training in wounds. No one else wanted to do it, so I said okay.”

“The weekends were really bad. We only had a few people working weekends.”

“I know some of the patients didn’t get turned all day.”

“We always were running out of supplies, so I improvised.”

All of these confessions, or truths, are from real life depositions of nurses who were working in facilities that patients were suing because they developed wounds. These nurses were not trying to hurt their facility in any way or stymie the defense team, but were simply telling the truth in their opinion.

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