Wound Care and Epibole: It’s All About the Edge

May 18th, 2017

How do you spot an unhealthy wound edge? Learn more about the causes, prevention and treatment of epibole.

Wound Care and Epibole: It’s All About the Edge

 

When it comes to treating epibole, it’s all about knowing what a healthy wound edge looks like – and being able to spot signs of trouble. This basic overview includes epibole causes, prevention and treatment. We’ll have you ready to meet this condition head-on and get your patients on their way to recovery.

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Nine Wound Care Documentation Pitfalls to Avoid

May 12th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Lawsuits often are settled out of court because the medical record documentation is not defensible. Incomplete, illogical, and inconsistent records are far too common, so it is important to avoid the common pitfalls.

9 Wound Care Documentation Pitfalls to Avoid

 

After reviewing hundreds of medical charts involved in litigation, I noticed many of the same problems occurring in the wound care documentation over and over again. From New York to Florida to California, it is remarkable how the same inconsistencies, errors, and oversights tend to stymie the defense of a case. The goal of every healthcare practitioner is to have complete, accurate, and timely documentation of the medical care given to each and every patient. Here are nine wound care documentation pitfalls to avoid.

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Wound Care Minute: How to Measure Wounds on a Foot

April 14th, 2017

In this 90-second video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan explains how to use the clock method to measure foot wounds.

 

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The Great (Legal) Debate About Turn and Reposition Documentation

April 7th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Documentation of turning and repositioning often leads to legal problems as some healthcare providers chart by exception and others chart at the point of care.

The Great (Legal) Debate About Turn and Reposition Documentation

 

“The hospital never turned the patient, and therefore the patient suffered a serious pressure injury,” declared the plaintiff attorney. The defense team shot back, “Whoa. Slow down. Never is long time, and of course we turned the patient.” How can a basic care intervention such as turning and repositioning have two totally opposing views?

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Wound Care Challenge: Skin Folds and ITD

March 31st, 2017

How to identify and treat intertriginous dermatitis (ITD) within the skin folds among obese patients.

Skin Folds and ITD

 

Statistics show that more than one in three adults in the U.S. are obese (BMI>30). Patients within this population often have skin folds in many areas of the body, especially under the arms, in the groin, under the breasts, and beneath the panniculus – an overhanging “apron” of skin and fatty tissue in the lower abdomen. As a result, this population is more likely to experience a common inflammatory condition called intertriginous dermatitis (ITD) – also known as intertrigo.  But what exactly causes ITD, and what are the best ways to treat it?

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What’s New in Wound Care? Meet Our Fantastic Four

March 15th, 2017

Check out these four new and cutting-edge wound treatments that’ll have you excited and ready for the future.

What’s New in Wound Care? Meet Our Fantastic Four

 

When it comes to wound care, there are some incredible developments in progress that might just blow your mind. In fact, these new products and treatments are so cutting-edge, they sound like they’re straight out of science a fiction movie or super hero comic book. What are they and why are we so excited?

Meet the Fantastic Four

Clinicians know that healing chronic wounds is especially challenging due to a variety of barriers and patient co-morbidities. Fortunately, advanced treatments and technologies facilitate the care of these wounds and promote healing. These advancements are having a positive impact in terms of shortened healing times and reduced hospital stays.

Ready for some impressive examples? Let’s take a look at four fantastic new wound treatments that are either in the experimental or trial phase, and will hopefully be a part of our wound-care future.

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Pressure Injury Case Shines Spotlight on Wound Care Education

March 10th, 2017

Trained wound care clinicians truly make a difference in the lives of their patients. This caregiver knows first-hand, and wanted to share her story. 

Pressure Injury Case Shines Spotlight on Wound Care Education

January 10, 2017

 

Recently, a 45-year-old caregiver by the name of Annie* contacted WCEI for help. She was desperate and in search of answers. Her personal account serves as a sobering reminder of why we do what we do. Here is her story.

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Disappointed by Debridement

March 3rd, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Plaintiffs often express shock and disbelief after eschar is removed, which often leaves a wound larger than the original size of the eschar.

Disappointed by Debridement

Wound photo: “Stage 4 decubitus displaying the Gluteus medius muscle attached to the crest of the ilium” by Bobjgalindo is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

“We were in shock and couldn’t believe our eyes. It was like half her foot was gone.”

“My husband and I were horrified when we saw what they did.”

“My sister and I looked at each other, and I just kept asking why?”

“I had to leave the room and go the bathroom to cry when I saw what they did to my mother.”

You might think these quotes are from people who have witnessed a shocking crime or some sort of violence, but they are not. These are quotes from family members, now plaintiffs, who are suing for poor medical care related to a chronic wound. Their shock all had one thing in common—it came after seeing a wound that was surgically debrided.

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Diabetic Toenails: Watch for Change

February 23rd, 2017

Changes in the diabetic foot can happen fast: here are the signs and types clinicians in wound care need to look for.

Diabetic Toenails: Watch for Change

 

As a wound care professional, chances are you’ve treated a number of nail conditions and abnormalities that occur among the general population. But when you’re working with diabetic patients, noticing and identifying variations is even more crucial. This is because change can happen more rapidly in the diabetic foot, and pathologies in diabetic toenails can ultimately lead to skin breakdown, foot ulcerations and infection. So, what causes the nails to change? What exactly should you look for? We’ve got you covered.

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Wound Care Minute: How to Measure Depth of a Wound Covered by Slough or Eschar

February 17th, 2017

In this 90-second video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan answers a common measurement question: how do you measure wound depth when there’s slough or eschar in the way?

 

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