Posts Tagged ‘Debridement’

Disappointed by Debridement

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Plaintiffs often express shock and disbelief after eschar is removed, which often leaves a wound larger than the original size of the eschar.

Disappointed by Debridement

Wound photo: “Stage 4 decubitus displaying the Gluteus medius muscle attached to the crest of the ilium” by Bobjgalindo is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

“We were in shock and couldn’t believe our eyes. It was like half her foot was gone.”

“My husband and I were horrified when we saw what they did.”

“My sister and I looked at each other, and I just kept asking why?”

“I had to leave the room and go the bathroom to cry when I saw what they did to my mother.”

You might think these quotes are from people who have witnessed a shocking crime or some sort of violence, but they are not. These are quotes from family members, now plaintiffs, who are suing for poor medical care related to a chronic wound. Their shock all had one thing in common—it came after seeing a wound that was surgically debrided.

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Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

Friday, February 10th, 2017

What should wound care professionals do when a physician orders wet-to-dry dressings? Be prepared and know the facts.

Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

 

Those of us in wound care know that wet-to-dry dressing are considered substandard care. Some physicians, however, commonly order wet-to-dry dressings for patients, often leaving clinicians in a tricky situation. Do you feel conflicted as to how you should respond? It can be intimidating, but with a little preparation, it doesn’t have to be. By knowing the facts about wet-to-dry dressings, as well as effective and cost-efficient alternatives, you can handle such situations with confidence. Not sure where to start? We’re here to help.

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Wound Care Myths: 5 More Debunked

Friday, November 25th, 2016

Whether it involves heel protectors, anti-embolism stockings, or letting wounds “breathe,” there are still plenty of wound-care myths circulating out there. Ready for the truth? You can handle it.

Wound Care Myths: 5 More Debunked

 

Do you use wet-to-dry dressings in order to save money? Have you administered oral antibiotics to treat infected wounds? And do you follow physicians’ orders for wound treatments even though you know they’re inappropriate?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you are not alone. You are among a host of other professionals who have believed or participated in some of the most common wound care myths. In an earlier post, we revealed why these and other wound care myths simply need to go away. But we’re not finished. Here are five more myths that run counter to the evidence and wound care standards that guide our clinical practice.

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Wound Care and Debridement: Know the BEAMS

Friday, August 26th, 2016

These five major debridement methods for wound clinicians are easy to remember (hint: BEAMS), and key to the wound healing process.

Wound Care and Debridement: Know the BEAMS

When it comes to healing chronic wounds, clinicians are all about Wound Bed Preparation, which is the process of removing local barriers to wound healing. A key to this process is debridement – the removal of necrotic, dead tissues from the wound bed.

In order to provide the best care possible for your patients, it’s important to know the differences between the two main categories and five major methods of debridement.

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Debridement Basics. How Many Methods Are There?

Monday, December 1st, 2014

beamsDebridement is the removal of necrotic, dead tissue from the wound bed. It also plays a vital role in the tissue management concept of Wound Bed Preparation.  Wound Bed Preparation is the comprehensive approach we use to get our chronic wounds to heal. There are two main categories of debridement:  selective and non- selective debridement.  Selective debridement are methods where only necrotic, non-viable tissue is removed from the wound bed. Non-selective debridement methods remove both necrotic tissue and viable living tissue.

There are 5 major debridement methods. They are known by the acronym BEAMS.  The Selective methods include:  Biological, Enzymatic and Autolytic debridement methods.  The non-selective methods are: Mechanical and Sharp debridement methods.

Biological debridement is also known as maggot debridement using sterile medical maggots to remove necrotic tissue. These sterile maggots debride necrotic tissue by liquefying and digesting it, they also kill and ingest bacteria while stimulating wound healing.

Enzymatic debridement is the use of collagenase ointment (Santyl) once daily to the wound bed. The ointment works from the bottom up to loosen the collagen that holds the necrotic material to the wound bed. It is a faster method than autolytic debridement, but slower than sharp debridement.

Autolytic Debridement is the slowest type of debridement. It uses the body’s own enzymes to assist in breaking down the necrotic tissue. This is achieved by using products that maintain a moist wound environment. This type of debridement is not appropriate for large amounts of necrotic tissue or infected wounds.

Mechanical debridement is a method that uses an external force to separate the necrotic tissue from the wound bed. This may be painful and removes non-viable as well as viable tissue.  Methods include wet to dry dressings, scrubbing, whirlpool and irrigation. Contraindications for mechanical debridement would be epithelializing and granulating wounds.

The fastest method of debridement is Sharp debridement. There are 2 types, Sharp surgical (done by a surgeon, physician or podiatrist) or sharp conservative (done at bedside by a trained clinician). It involves the use of scalpels, scissors, curettes or forceps.  Sharp surgical is a major procedure that sacrifices some viable tissue where sharp conservative is a minor procedure done at the bedside that removes non-viable tissue.

The debridement method used will be chosen on a variety of factors including the wound characteristics, amount of necrotic tissue in wound, efficiency and selectivity of the debridement method itself, pain management for your patient, the cost of the procedure, exudate levels of the wound, presence of or risk of infection, the patients care setting, and the patients overall medical condition all need to be taken into account.

It is also important to remember not every patient with necrotic tissue will always be a candidate for debridement. Be sure that you understand indications and contraindications for each debridement method when you are selecting the method for your patient.

Click Here for FREE WEBINAR – HOW TO: Debridement Options: BEAMS Made Easy use coupon code BEAMS through 12/31/15.

Chronic Wound Intervention Basics (Parts 1 & 2)

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Bill Richlen

Chronic Wound Intervention Basics (Parts 1 &2) will be presented by Bill Richlen PT, WCC, CWS, of Infinitus LLC, WCEI Instructor at this year’s Wild on Wounds National Conference in Las Vegas this September 7-10,2011

Chronic wounds are difficult to heal. So let’s go back to the basics. They provide a huge challenge for even the best wound care clinician. Come to this session and let’s discuss what make these wounds so difficult and what we can do to speed the healing process. We’ll talk about bioburden and the effects it has on wound healing. Debridement: when to use it, what method to use. Wound complications, risk prevention, adjunctive therapies and tissue loads. This information will be provided in this two part session.

For more information about the Wound Care Education Institute, please visit http://www.wcei.net.

Click Here To Register for the Wild on Wounds National Conference