Posts Tagged ‘Diabetic Wound Certification’

Wild On Wounds Exhibitor Showcase Vendor Spotlight

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Scott_Miller_MPM

MPM Medical Inc. brings to you industry experts for 2 days during the WOW conference in Las Vegas on September 2-5, 2015. They will answer your questions, perform product demonstrations and provide hands on product training.  All of their sales representatives have been trained and certified as Wound Care Market Specialists (CWCMS®) by the Wound Care Education Institute®.  They offer a comprehensive line of hydrogels with lidocaine, foam dressings, moisture barriers, antifungals, calcium alginates, waterproof composite dressings, woundgard bordered gauze pad dressings, multilayer composite dressings, cleansers, saturated gauze pads and collagen and super absorbent dressings.

MPM has published a number of practical reference pieces including a definitive Wound Management Guide, Wound Care Wall Charts and clinical studies.  For information on these educational pieces visit their website at: www.mpmmedicalinc.com

Register for WOW today and stop by the MPM booth #224

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What Will You Gain by Attending WOW?  You Will…

  • Discover what is new in wound care which is essential to your practice
  • Elevate your clinical skills with interactive, advanced, how-to sessions and hands-on workshops
  • Participate in product training with industry experts to advance your knowledge of wound care technologies
  • AND MORE…

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

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Wild On Wounds Conference Early Registration Savings

Friday, April 17th, 2015

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When you register early, you save $100 and you will have first choice in selecting all conference sessions. The early discount rate expires May 1, 2015.  Register today!

Industry and clinical experts will provide training, product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions.

Join us in Las Vegas, September 2-5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

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WOUND CARE CERTIFICATION – This Wound Care Certified (WCC®) course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

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DIABETIC WOUND CERTIFICATION – This Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

WCEI2015_OMS_BUTTON_revOSTOMY CERTIFICATION – This Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DETAILS

 

Diabetic Patient Education

Monday, December 29th, 2014

Patient education plays a vital role in positive outcomes for our diabetic patient. Diabetic patients need to understand the importance of proper foot care and importance of good blood glucose control to maintain the integrity of their feet.

So what do our patients need to know? They need to work closely with their physician and the dietician to be sure their blood glucose levels are properly controlled. foot_mirror_between_toesThe ADA recommends an A1c below 7%.  They need to know how important it is to check their feet daily to catch any problems early. We as clinicians need to teach them how to do this and what to look for. Teach your diabetic patients to inspect their feet everyday. They can do this by having family members or caregivers check their feet, or they can use a mirror and do it themselves.

Explain to your patients what exactly they are looking for; cuts, sores, red spots, swelling, infected toenails, blisters, calluses, cracks, excessive dryness or any other abnormality. They should check all surfaces of the feet and toes carefully, at the same time each and every day. Explain to your patients to call their physician right away if they notice any abnormalities or any open areas. Other problems the diabetic patient should be aware of with their feet and report to their physician include tingling or burning sensation, pain in the feet, cracks in the skin, a change in the shape of their foot, or lack of sensation – they might not feel warm, cold, or touch. The patient should be aware that any of the above could potentially lead to diabetic foot ulcers.

Instruct your patients to wash their feet every day, but not soak their feet. Use warm, NOT hot water – be sure they check the water temperature with a thermometer or shoe_fittheir elbow. Dry feet well, especially between toes. Apply lotion on the tops and bottoms of their feet but not between toes. Trim toenails each week and as needed after bath / shower, trim nails straight across with clippers, smooth edges with emery board.

Wear socks and shoes at all times, the diabetic patient should never be barefoot, even indoors. Have them check their shoes prior to wearing, be sure there are no objects inside and the lining is smooth.  Instruct them to wear shoes that protect their feet; athletic shoes or walking shoes that are leather are best, be sure they fit their feet appropriately and accommodate the foot width and any foot deformities.

For our diabetic patients, glucose control is a key factor in keeping them healthy, but patient education and understanding of proper foot inspection and what findings to report to their physician are just as important for the well being of our diabetic patient.

Free Webinar “How-To: Diabetic Foot Exam Made Easy”. Use Promo Code: DFOOT  through 12/31/15.

“Footnotes on Selecting Diabetic Footwear”

Monday, January 28th, 2013

There are a lot of shoes out there, but not all of them would be appropriate selections for our diabetic patients.  In fact, selecting improper footwear could actually harm our diabetic patients and lead to diabetic foot ulcers and possible amputations.  Statistics show that 50% of amputations of our diabetic patients are directly related to improper footwear!amputation

Diabetic Wound Certified clinicians need to know how to check the footwear of our patients as well as the staff caring for our patients.  What are we looking for in a shoe for our diabetic patient?  The shoe should offer a firm snug fit.  The heel should be less than 1 inch, the greater the heel the greater the pressure on the ball of the foot and this could lead to callus formation and ulcerations.  The shoe should have laces, buckles or elastic to hold it in place.  When the diabetic is wearing slip on shoes the toes must curl to hold the shoe on and this can lead to calluses on the top of the toes and potential ulceration.  The shoe should have 1cm between the longest toe and the end of the shoe when the patient stands, we don’t want added pressure to the tips of the toes or on the toenails.  The sole of the shoe should be smooth without seams and cushioned to absorb shock and reduce pressure on the feet.  The shoe should be made from a material that “breathes”, avoid plastic and vinyl as they can encourage fungal infections.  The shoe should have a protective function; a closed toe shoe is imperative for our diabetic patient.  Look closely at the patients foot and the shoe – they should be the same shape, pointed toe shoes cause corns, calluses and ulcerations! Be sure the shoe width is appropriate, has a wide toe box that allow toes to move and accommodates any foot deformity.  The heel of the shoe should also be firm, you can check this by holding the sides of the heel of the shoe between your thumb and forefinger, try to push them together, if the heel compresses, its to soft and won’t give the patient good enough support when walking.

We also need to teach our patients and their family members instructions on checking for proper fit of their shoes and how to shop for new shoes.  They should be re-measured each time, shop late in the day, try on both shoes and walk around in them to ensure they are comfortable, be sure there is a thumbs width of space at the end of the longest toe, try the shoe on with the socks they will be wearing, be sure the heel is less than an inch, and be sure the shoe has laces or velcro closures.  If the patient has serious foot problems or deformities they should be referred for specially molded inserts and or shoes.

Following the above recommendations may just prevent a patient from developing a diabetic foot ulcer and an amputation!  Patient and caregiver education is a key factor in preventing diabetic foot ulcers!

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Diabetic Foot Ulcer Case Studies: Not All DFU’s are the Same

Friday, July 8th, 2011

Diabetic Foot Wounds

Diabetic Foot Ulcer Case Studie: Not All DFU’s are the same will be presented by Jeffrey Jensen DPM, FACFAS, Dean of Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine at this year’s Wild On Wounds National Conference in Las Vegas, September 7-10, 2011

Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcerations goes far beyond which dressing to use at a particular time. In this session we will discuss time tested diagnostic approaches, treatment guidelines, and the latest in technologies to assist in healing this difficult patient population.

This dove tails nicely to those who have already obtained their DWC (Diabetic Wound Certification) and for those considering taking the course through the Wound Care Education Institute. If you are coming to this year’s Wild on Wounds National Conference, make sure you catch this session.

The Next Level To Your Wound Care Certification

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

The Next Level To Your Wound Care Certification!

Introducing the DWC® credential
(Diabetic Wound Certified).

This is an advanced, specialized certification in diabetic wound management designed to enhance your current wound certification within the Diabetic field. The DWC credential will demonstrate your proficiency and mastery of essential knowledge and skills of diabetic wound management above basic wound care certification.  Diabetic wound management focuses on overall diabetic wound care and promotion of an optimal wound healing environment, including prevention, therapeutic interventions and rehabilitative interventions.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW DATES & LOCATIONS

What is the Price?
Regular Registration
Individual  – $2,897
Group* (per person) – $2,597
Early Registration**
Individual – $2,597
Group* (per person) – $2,297
Registration includes NAWC exam fees
*Group Rates available to 3 or more registering and paying at the same time.
**Early registration balance due in full 45 days prior to course

How many days is class?
5-Day Class Sessions
Days 1-4:  Concentrated all-day Diabetic Wound Care training sessions

Day 5
NAWC® Wound Care Certification Examination 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM
(Administered by National Alliance of Wound Care®) following WCEI’s wound care training.

Who is eligible?
The DWC credential is open to healthcare professionals who currently hold an accredited certification in wound care. (WCC®, CWS®, CWCN®, CWON® and CWOCN®) in addition to:

  • Hold a current, unrestricted license as an LPN/LVN, RN, NP, PT, PTA, OT, MD, DPM, DO or PA
  • Document active involvement in the care of wound care patients, or in management, education or research directly related to wound care for at least one (1) year post basic wound care certification
  • Successfully complete an NAWC approved Diabetic Skin and Wound Management Course
  • Receive a passing score on the Diabetic Wound Certification Examination “The DWC” credential is valid for five (5) years

Course Outline:

  • Anatomy/Physiology of the Foot
  • Epidemiology
  • Pathogenesis Diabetic Foot Ulcers
  • Diagnostics – Perfusion, Sensory Testing, Biomechanics, Labs, Radiology
  • Hands-On Skill of Total Contact Casting and Sharp Debridement
  • Examination, History, Dermatologic Aspects and Complications, Nail Examination, Structure/Deformities of the Foot and Footwear Assessment
  • Diabetic Foot Ulcer Assessment and Treatment
  • Infection, Debridement, Dressings, Local Wound Care, Adjunctive Therapies, Bio-engineered Products, Negative Pressure Therapy, Growth Factors, Hyperbaric Oxygen, Electrical Stimulation, Offloading, Skin/Nail/Callus Treatment
  • Psychosocial Assessment
  • Prevention
  • Foot Ulcer/Amputation Prevention and Interventions
  • Nutrition
  • Pain Interventions
  • Unsalvageable Foot, Surgical Aspects, Amputee Rehabilitation
  • Multidisciplinary Care Team Model, Overall Diabetic Foot Management Goals, Patient education, Legal Aspects and Referrals

CLICK HERE FOR DWC CANDIDATE HANDBOOK

FAQ Click Here

NAWC Observes National Diabetes Awareness Month with Introduction of DWC Credential

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Diabetic Wound Certified

National Alliance of Wound Care® (NAWC®) Observes National Diabetes Awareness Month with the Introduction of Its DWC® Diabetic Wound Certified Credential


Sadly, more than 23 million Americans and 246 million individuals world-wide suffer from Diabetes. This preventable disease is the leading cause of non traumatic lower-limb amputations, contributing to the staggering rate of limb amputations which occur every 30 seconds. Proper wound care can prevent most diabetic related amputations, however, up until now there has been a limited opportunity for healthcare clinicians to specialize in the care of diabetic wounds. Thanks to the NAWC, our Nation’s largest and fastest growing wound care credentialing board, there is a new advanced wound care certification designed to address this universal epidemic.
This specialized certification will help fill the dramatic need for more qualified wound care clinicians in the growing field of diabetic wounds. Current certified wound care professionals can now advance their expertise in the care of diabetic wounds by obtaining the DWC. “The DWC is the first multispecialty, advanced credential in diabetic wounds and opens the door for advancement to thousands of certified wound care clinicians”, said Debbie Hecker RN, MBA, WCC, and Executive Director of the National Alliance of Wound Care.
In recognition of National Diabetes Month, the NAWC welcomes all certified wound care clinicians to consider striving for the DWC credential. The DWC credential will be available starting in early 2011. The need for better patient education and proper wound care is critical to fight and manage this growing disease. To learn more about the DWC credential and the National Alliance of Wound, visit their website at http://www.nawccb.org.

ADA
To learn more about National Diabetes Month and World Diabetes Day November 14, visit the American Diabetes Association website. http://www.diabetes.org/.

Diabetic Wound Certification Credentials

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Take Your Wound Care Certification To The Next Level!

Introducing the DWC® credential (Diabetic Wound Certified).  This is an advanced, specialized certification in diabetic wound management.  It demonstrates a candidate’s proficiency and mastery of essential knowledge and skills of diabetic wound management above basic wound care certification.  Diabetic wound management focuses on overall diabetic wound care and promotion of an optimal wound healing environment, including prevention, therapeutic interventions and rehabilitative interventions.

Who is eligible?
The DWC credential is open to healthcare professionals who currently hold an accredited certification in wound care. (WCC®, CWS®, CWCN®, CWON® and CWOCN®) in addition to:

  • Hold a current, unrestricted license as an LPN/LVN, RN, NP, PT, PTA, OT, MD, DPM, DO or PA
  • Document active involvement in the care of wound care patients, or in management, education or research directly related to wound care for at least one (1) year post basic wound care certification
  • Successfully complete an NAWC approved Diabetic Skin and Wound Management Course
  • Receive a passing score on the Diabetic Wound Certification Examination “The DWC” credential is valid for five (5) years

When is it available?
DWC classes and certification examination will be available beginning the first quarter of 2011 and on a regular basis thereafter.  Classes are independent of the WCEI wound and skin care course.
Registration Now Open

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

For more information about this upcoming course or to become Wound Care Certified, please visit WCEI at  http://www.wcei.net