Posts Tagged ‘diabetic wound management’

Diabetic Patient Education

Monday, December 29th, 2014

Patient education plays a vital role in positive outcomes for our diabetic patient. Diabetic patients need to understand the importance of proper foot care and importance of good blood glucose control to maintain the integrity of their feet.

So what do our patients need to know? They need to work closely with their physician and the dietician to be sure their blood glucose levels are properly controlled. foot_mirror_between_toesThe ADA recommends an A1c below 7%.  They need to know how important it is to check their feet daily to catch any problems early. We as clinicians need to teach them how to do this and what to look for. Teach your diabetic patients to inspect their feet everyday. They can do this by having family members or caregivers check their feet, or they can use a mirror and do it themselves.

Explain to your patients what exactly they are looking for; cuts, sores, red spots, swelling, infected toenails, blisters, calluses, cracks, excessive dryness or any other abnormality. They should check all surfaces of the feet and toes carefully, at the same time each and every day. Explain to your patients to call their physician right away if they notice any abnormalities or any open areas. Other problems the diabetic patient should be aware of with their feet and report to their physician include tingling or burning sensation, pain in the feet, cracks in the skin, a change in the shape of their foot, or lack of sensation – they might not feel warm, cold, or touch. The patient should be aware that any of the above could potentially lead to diabetic foot ulcers.

Instruct your patients to wash their feet every day, but not soak their feet. Use warm, NOT hot water – be sure they check the water temperature with a thermometer or shoe_fittheir elbow. Dry feet well, especially between toes. Apply lotion on the tops and bottoms of their feet but not between toes. Trim toenails each week and as needed after bath / shower, trim nails straight across with clippers, smooth edges with emery board.

Wear socks and shoes at all times, the diabetic patient should never be barefoot, even indoors. Have them check their shoes prior to wearing, be sure there are no objects inside and the lining is smooth.  Instruct them to wear shoes that protect their feet; athletic shoes or walking shoes that are leather are best, be sure they fit their feet appropriately and accommodate the foot width and any foot deformities.

For our diabetic patients, glucose control is a key factor in keeping them healthy, but patient education and understanding of proper foot inspection and what findings to report to their physician are just as important for the well being of our diabetic patient.

Free Webinar “How-To: Diabetic Foot Exam Made Easy”. Use Promo Code: DFOOT  through 12/31/15.

Wound Care Education Institute 2013 Class Schedule Posted

Friday, January 18th, 2013

The Wound Care Education Institute® (WCEI®) is the official certification course for Wound Care Certified® (WCC®), Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) and the new Ostomy Management Specialist™ (OMS).

Wound Care Education Institute

Wound Care Education Institute

WCEI is a dedicated center of education designed to provide students with comprehensive training programs taught by top-notch, up-beat instructors. Our training is practical, valuable, interesting, fun, high energy and interactive. On-site courses are located at multiple locations throughout the U.S.  and most are offered as a self-paced computer based module.

Upon successful completion of our programs, eligible medical professionals can then complete an on-site exam offered by the National Alliance of Wound Care® to achieve their National Certification in Wound Care (WCC®), Diabetic Wound Management (DWC®) or Ostomy Management Specialist℠ (OMS). Eligible medical professionals include: RNs, LPN/LVNs, PTs, PTAs, OTs, NPs, PAs, and MD/DOs.

Visit our website for individual class schedules at www.wcei.net

 

Diabetic Wound Certification Credentials

Monday, October 25th, 2010

Take Your Wound Care Certification To The Next Level!

Introducing the DWC® credential (Diabetic Wound Certified).  This is an advanced, specialized certification in diabetic wound management.  It demonstrates a candidate’s proficiency and mastery of essential knowledge and skills of diabetic wound management above basic wound care certification.  Diabetic wound management focuses on overall diabetic wound care and promotion of an optimal wound healing environment, including prevention, therapeutic interventions and rehabilitative interventions.

Who is eligible?
The DWC credential is open to healthcare professionals who currently hold an accredited certification in wound care. (WCC®, CWS®, CWCN®, CWON® and CWOCN®) in addition to:

  • Hold a current, unrestricted license as an LPN/LVN, RN, NP, PT, PTA, OT, MD, DPM, DO or PA
  • Document active involvement in the care of wound care patients, or in management, education or research directly related to wound care for at least one (1) year post basic wound care certification
  • Successfully complete an NAWC approved Diabetic Skin and Wound Management Course
  • Receive a passing score on the Diabetic Wound Certification Examination “The DWC” credential is valid for five (5) years

When is it available?
DWC classes and certification examination will be available beginning the first quarter of 2011 and on a regular basis thereafter.  Classes are independent of the WCEI wound and skin care course.
Registration Now Open

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

For more information about this upcoming course or to become Wound Care Certified, please visit WCEI at  http://www.wcei.net