Posts Tagged ‘free webinar’

Stomas: What You Need to Know

Friday, January 6th, 2017

There are two main types of stomas, and they both have certain “ideal” characteristics in common. Do you know what they are?

Stomas: What You Need to Know

 

You say potato, I say potahto. You say ostomy, I say … stoma. Huh? Those of us in wound care know that it’s not uncommon to hear the terms ostomy and stoma used interchangeably, even though they have different meanings.

In the WCEI blog, “Let’s Talk Ostomy Types,” we described the types and sub-types of bowel and bladder ostomy surgeries. Now, we’re focusing on an aspect of ostomies that wound care professionals experience directly in practice: the stoma.

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Wound Assessment: Skin of Many Colors

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Understanding the structural differences between light and dark skin is crucial for clinicians, and this free Wild on Wounds webinar will help – plus you’ll get awesome tips for assessing skin of color.

- Cropped

 

Chances are that when you studied skin assessment in US textbooks, most of the case studies or featured photos involved patients with lighter skin tones – common to people of European decent.  Historically (and unfortunately), there’s been a lack of research, guidelines and consistency in treating skin of color.

This lack of diversity in educational resources is not only a disservice to clinicians and patients, it can be downright dangerous. For example, without exposure to proper techniques, you might not recognize a Stage I pressure ulcer in a darker-skinned patient, because non-blanchable erythema (redness) is harder to see.

As our patient population grows increasingly diverse, it is absolutely essential that bedside clinicians understand how skin differs among people of various ethnic and racial backgrounds, and what that means in wound assessment.

Learning starts here

Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Co-founder/ Clinical Instructor

Nancy Morgan, RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Co-founder/ Clinical Instructor

The truth of the matter is that most of us have learned whatever we can about treating skin of color from our own experiences in the field. This is why WCEI Co-founder and Clinical Instructor

Nancy Morgan addressed this topic in her Wild on Wounds (WOW) 2015 National Conference presentation, “How to: Skin of Color.”

Now offered as an on-demand webinar, Morgan discusses the specific characteristics of skin of color, and how clinical conditions present differently in highly pigmented (versus lighter) skin. You can hear her entire presentation – and view it for free – with a special coupon code (listed below).

What makes skin darker?

Skin color is the result of melanin – a brown pigment. The purpose of melanin is to protect the skin by absorbing harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.  As we encounter UV rays, special cells called melanocytes produce additional melanin.

You may be surprised to learn that there’s no difference in the number of melanocytes between skin types. The palest and the darkest person will, on average, have the same number of these cells in their skin. However, the production and concentration of melanin in the epidermis (top layer of skin) is double in darker skin.

Does skin tone matter?

There are many skin tone classification scales used in the field, created mostly by and for dermatologists.  As Morgan states in her presentation, these scales aren’t helpful when it comes to wound care. “We have to do a very thorough visual inspection of the skin, and we have to talk to the patient about his or her baseline skin color.”

More webinar highlights

Besides exploring the basics of skin color and tone, you’ll find out more from Morgan’s webinar, including:

  • Skin conditions more common in darker skin, such as hyperpigmentation, keloid scarring, and xerosis.
  • Useful tips for performing a holistic assessment of a patient with dark skin.
  • Why some clinical conditions – such as sDTI, erythema or cyanosis – can be much more difficult to pick up in skin of color.
  • How other conditions, such as hemosiderin staining, may appear very different than they would in a patient with lighter skin.

Get your free webinarFree Webinar - Skin of Color

Are you ready to learn more about this topic and better address the wound care needs of your patients with dark skin?  Click here and use the code BLOG to access this 60-minute recording, which qualifies for an education credit.

More thoughts?

We’d love to know about your clinical experiences with skin of color: did you receive any official training regarding this topic, or have you mostly learned from your own personal experiences? Is your facility proactive in making sure clinicians are knowledgeable in how skin tone and color effect proper wound assessment? Tell us about your observations and experiences by leaving your comments below.

Wild on Wounds℠ (WOW) is the national wound conference designed for healthcare professionals that are interested in enhancing their knowledge in skin and wound management. Clinicians come from all over the US to see, touch and participate in our hands-on workshops. They also learn about all the new and advanced wound care treatments and technologies to better help care for their patients.  For more information visit www.woundseminar.com

Ouch! Let’s Talk About Skin Tears

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

This WCEI free webinar will help wound care professionals understand more about skin tears, including how to treat and prevent them (and help patients heal).

Skin Tears - Prevention and Management

If you’ve ever suffered a significant skin tear, then you know how painful they can be. The inevitable bleeding (and sometimes even disfigurement) during the healing process can take a toll, both physically and emotionally. So you can imagine how awful it would be to experience this same cycle of pain, over and over again.

Unfortunately, skin tears are a common occurrence with institutionalized patients (particularly in older adults), and often lead to further complications. In fact, a reported 1.5 million skin tears occur in this population each year, and that doesn’t even include unreported incidents occurring at home.

But we’re here to help, thanks to our own WCEI Clinical Instructor Gail Hebert, and her presentation at the 2015 Wild on Wounds National Conference in Las Vegas, “How To: Skin Tears – Prevention and Management.” In this free webinar (see access code below), you can listen to her recorded session and arm yourself with the latest information about skin tear treatment, prevention and management. You can also help to bring the number of annual skin tears down while protecting patients and helping support the facilities in which you work.

 

Gail Hebert, RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Clinical Instructor

Gail Hebert, RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, WCEI Clinical Instructor

Ready to learn?

So what exactly is a skin tear? As Hebert explains in the webinar, it’s a traumatic wound caused by shear, friction and/or blunt force trauma that results in either a partial or full thickness injury. And while skin tears certainly occur, to think they are inevitable is short-sighted.

“Our role is to make sure we’ve done everything we can to minimize their occurrences,” says Hebert. “Not just by accepting that skin tears happen and move on, but to work hard at all the variables that can be controlled, so skin tears can be the exception rather than the rule.”

Through Hebert’s webinar, you will learn so much more about skin tears, including:

  • How to identify risks for skin tears and skin tear category classifications.
  • Current evidence-based recommendations for accurate skin tear assessment, prediction, treatment and prevention strategies.
  • Forms and tools you can put to use immediately.

“Skin tears are considered to be negative patient outcomes,” adds Hebert. “So in terms of your facility’s reputation, you don’t want to be known as a place where an excessive number of skin tears take place.” In other words, if people wonder if your facility is doing everything it can to prevent them, you want to be able to respond with a resounding, “Yes!”

 

What people have to say

Those who were able to attend Hebert’s session in person last summer at the WOW Conference had plenty of feedback to share. Here’s a sample:

 

 “Who knew there was enough on this subject matter to actually speak on it for one whole hour? It was great!”

“Excellent speaker, and was happy to hear that I was caring for skin tears in the right manner! Now I can go back to my facilities and students, and pass this information on! Thank you so much! Very engaging speaker!”

“This was a great review for me. I used last year’s skin tear outline to help build our skin tear policy, so I truly appreciate the updated outlines provided with this lecture.”

 

Go ahead, take the skin-tear plunge!

Are you ready to learn more about skin tears and put into practice your newfound knowledge?  Click here and use the code SKINTEARS to access this 60-minute recording, which qualifies for an education credit.

 

 

Tell us your stories

Have you made improvements in your own facility when it comes to skin-tear prevention? What were they, and what results have you noticed? Do you have any other suggestions for skin-tear treatment, prevention or assessment? Leave your comments below.

 

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.