Posts Tagged ‘Lawsuit’

Can You Use Job Burnout as a Legal Defense?

Friday, November 10th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

Wound care is a stressful profession, and sometimes your empathy bucket becomes empty, but job burnout is not a proper professional or legal defense.

Can You Use Job Burnout as a Legal Defense?

 

A group of my professional friends were having lunch together and catching up when one friend disclosed that she was taking a month off of work. We all looked at her agape and at the same time exclaimed “a month?” We had a dozen questions for her. Was she ill? How did she arrange this? What did her supervisor say? Would she still have her job at the end of the month? And most importantly, why was she taking a month off?

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Three Common Reasons You Might Get Sued

Friday, August 11th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Patients often sue for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the medical care rendered, but rather for the human care that is perceived as lacking.

Three Common Reasons You Might Get Sued

 

The last few weeks were very difficult for my family and friends in the medical sense. I had one family member in an intensive care unit on the West Coast, one friend’s father in a rehab facility on the East Coast, and one friend’s son having problems in the outpatient setting in the Midwest. These patients are male and female, young and old, and have very different medical histories, but they all have one thing in common. They all want to sue about their medical care or lack thereof. These cases illustrate three common reasons you might get sued. Let’s take a closer look at what has gone wrong for each patient.

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When Your Patient Refuses to Be Turned and Repositioned—And Then Sues!

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

The battle between optimal medical care and patient rights is one to fight with empathy and finesse to keep it out of the courtroom.

When Your Patient Refuses to Be Turned and Repositioned—And Then Sues!

 

I recently reviewed a lawsuit filed by the family of a patient* with a spinal cord injury. The patient was involved in a car accident and sustained multiple traumatic injuries. The medical team worked tirelessly over the course of many weeks to stabilize him. Because of this catastrophic accident, the patient was understandably quite devastated and depressed. He refused all physical therapy and spent most days lying in bed on his back, despite encouragement from his medical team and pleading from his family. He frequently stated that he wished he was dead and that he wanted everyone to leave him alone, often escalating things to the point of screaming.

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The RATS of Malpractice: Don’t Let Them Invade Your Wound Care Practice!

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

The new year is quickly approaching, and most of us are reflecting and setting goals for 2017. Here’s a simple plan that outlines what you must do to minimize the risks of practice.

The RATS of Malpractice in Wound Care

 

As wound care practitioners, our main goal is to heal wounds as quickly and painlessly as possible. Over the years, this simple mission has gotten tied up in countless legal matters as disappointed patients and their families turn to attorneys when things don’t work out. Follow this outline of what to do to minimize the risks of practice in the new year.

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The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Clearly it is a legal liability when health care professionals (HCPs) do not follow doctor’s orders. But when the patient chooses not to follow doctor’s orders, things are not so clear.

The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

 

Most of the lawsuits I deal with have more than one named defendant. For example, the plaintiff (typically a deceased patient’s next of kin) might sue a hospital, a nursing home, and the attending physician at each facility. Sometimes they go a bit further and may even include the administrator, the director of nursing, and individual HCPs, such as the wound care nurse or the registered dietitian nutritionist.

When a lawsuit has multiple defendants, one of the main tasks is determining how much responsibility for the outcome to assign to each party. Responsibility is a nice word for blame, because that is really what we are talking about. Each defendant’s attorney will argue that their client is not to blame, which is obviously their job. What is not so obvious is that this means the attorney must deflect the blame to one of the other parties. It is truly every defendant for himself or herself.

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Your Patient Died: Should You Send the Family a Card?

Friday, September 9th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Bereavement care is part of the job, no matter how difficult it is to talk about death and deal with grieving family members.

Your Patient Died: Should You Send the Family a Card?

 

“Callous disregard.” These two little emotionally loaded words are how the plaintiff complaint summed up the following story from a grieving daughter named Sally.* In her deposition, Sally recounted how nice and welcoming everyone was at the nursing home when she toured it 3 years ago prior to moving her mom in. It seemed like a good place where the staff could provide the care her mom needed; care Sally was no longer able to provide for her at home as her mom’s physical and mental condition continued to worsen. Those feel-good sentiments were replaced by anger, sadness, and ultimately litigation after her mom died. When Sally was asked why she was suing, she replied that no one at the nursing home cared about her mother.

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Using Your Smartphone at Work: A Smart Idea or Not?

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

by Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

In health care, personal smartphone use at work is a complicated issue with legal implications.

Smartphones at Work

 

The plaintiff attorney drummed his fingers on the table while he stared at nurse Stephanie Holland* for what seemed like an eternity. He was waiting for her to respond to a seemingly simple question during her deposition—“Do you ever use your personal phone at work?”

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