Posts Tagged ‘Litigation’

The RATS of Malpractice: Don’t Let Them Invade Your Wound Care Practice!

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

The new year is quickly approaching, and most of us are reflecting and setting goals for 2017. Here’s a simple plan that outlines what you must do to minimize the risks of practice.

The RATS of Malpractice in Wound Care

 

As wound care practitioners, our main goal is to heal wounds as quickly and painlessly as possible. Over the years, this simple mission has gotten tied up in countless legal matters as disappointed patients and their families turn to attorneys when things don’t work out. Follow this outline of what to do to minimize the risks of practice in the new year.

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The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Clearly it is a legal liability when health care professionals (HCPs) do not follow doctor’s orders. But when the patient chooses not to follow doctor’s orders, things are not so clear.

The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

 

Most of the lawsuits I deal with have more than one named defendant. For example, the plaintiff (typically a deceased patient’s next of kin) might sue a hospital, a nursing home, and the attending physician at each facility. Sometimes they go a bit further and may even include the administrator, the director of nursing, and individual HCPs, such as the wound care nurse or the registered dietitian nutritionist.

When a lawsuit has multiple defendants, one of the main tasks is determining how much responsibility for the outcome to assign to each party. Responsibility is a nice word for blame, because that is really what we are talking about. Each defendant’s attorney will argue that their client is not to blame, which is obviously their job. What is not so obvious is that this means the attorney must deflect the blame to one of the other parties. It is truly every defendant for himself or herself.

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Great Expectations Unmet: The Real Reason Patients Sue

Friday, August 5th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Most lawsuits start not because of poor medical care but because families believe promises were made and broken and they are angry.

 

Great Expectations Unmet: The Real Reason Patients Sue

 

If you speak to any health care attorney about the proliferation of lawsuits against hospitals, nursing homes, and health care providers (HCPs) over the last decade or so, you will engage in a conversation peppered with a variety of legal terms. These may include breach of duty, negligence, malpractice, wrongful death, statutory standard of care, or even criminal culpability. It is important to understand that these are formal words with specific legal meanings, and at least a few of them appear on every plaintiff complaint as the reason for the lawsuit.

This is in sharp contrast to every deposition I have ever read from a plaintiff—usually the surviving spouse or child/children of the deceased. These family members never use legal jargon. Instead, they use emotional terms that reveal the true reason they are suing. Unless the family member works in the medical field, they rarely criticize the actual medical care but rather express great sadness with the personal care and the way they were treated. Plaintiffs frequently remark about the lack of caring they felt in health care. It is these words that we must focus on if we are to understand the patient perspective and thereby improve patient satisfaction.

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Say Cheese to the Camera: Wound Photography Shot by Family Members

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

These days, most people have a camera in their pocket, giving family members the ability to take their own wound photographs.

Say Cheese to the Camera: Wound Photography Shot by Family Members

 

When we talk about wound photography, we usually are referring to health care professionals (HCPs) taking periodic photographs to document the healing process as part of a patient’s permanent medical record. In fact, some new cameras are made specifically for this purpose. Some of these cameras not only capture an image but also can provide wound measurements, and some even offer automated integration into the patient’s electronic health record.

Today, however, HCPs are not the only ones with cameras. Family members or visitors to a wound clinic or health care facility usually have a camera with them, and they love to use it. This has raised new questions in wound care because many of these unofficial photographs become introduced as evidence in lawsuits.

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Using Your Smartphone at Work: A Smart Idea or Not?

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

by Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

In health care, personal smartphone use at work is a complicated issue with legal implications.

Smartphones at Work

 

The plaintiff attorney drummed his fingers on the table while he stared at nurse Stephanie Holland* for what seemed like an eternity. He was waiting for her to respond to a seemingly simple question during her deposition—“Do you ever use your personal phone at work?”

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If it Wasn’t Documented, It Wasn’t Done! Documentation Woes! Part 3

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

http://www.wcei.net . Cindy Broadus RN continues her discussion about Proper and Defensive Documentation.

In a continuation of the discussion of the medical record, Cindy has a unique position and speaks from experience. As a CLNI (Certified Legal Nurse Investigator) and LNC (Legal Nurse Consultant), she shares with us actual instances and common mistakes our peers often make while documenting. Listen in and watch as Cindy continues her presentation to the attendees at the Wild On Wounds Conference in Las Vegas Nevada

For more information about becoming Wound Care Certified, please visit http://www.wcei.net

Please visit WoundSeminar.com for more information about next year’s Wild On Wounds Conference being held in Las Vegas NV

If it Wasn’t Documented, It Wasn’t Done! Documentation Woes! Part 2

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

http://www.wcei.net . Cindy Broadus RN discusses Defensive Documentation.

The medical record is considered to be the most reliable source for determining what happened. It is a legal document, yet not always treated as such. With litigation lurking around the corner for every healthcare professional, we, as Wound Care Certified professionals, need to make sure our documentation is complete, concise and correct. Come on it and let’s talk about correct terms, techniques, and steps it will take to keep you out of trouble.

For more information about becoming Wound Care Certified, please visit http://www.wcei.net

If it wasn’t Documented, It wasn’t done!

Sunday, October 11th, 2009

How many times have we all heard, “If it wasn’t documented, it wasn’t done”? Far too often, we’re sure. Seriously, we as clinicians should take note of our documentation practices. Below is a short clip (Part 1 of 4) in which WCEI’s own Cindy Broadus RN, presented to the attendees at the Wild On Wounds Conference in Las Vegas NV in September. Her session was titled “If It Wasn’t Documented, It Wasn’t Done! Documentation Woes”.

Here was the description of the session: The medical record is considered to be the most reliable source for determining what happened. It is a legal document, yet not always treated as such. With litigation lurking around the corner for every health care professional, we, as Wound Care Certified professionals, need to make sure our documentation is complete, concise and correct. Come on it and let’s talk about correct terms, techniques, and steps it will take to keep you out of trouble.

Cindy always knocks it out of the park! Great job Cindy!