Posts Tagged ‘Moist Wound Dressing’

Always, Never, When? My approach to V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Susan Mendez-Eastman RN, CWCN, CPSN

Should you consider using negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell (NPWTi-d) on every wound ALWAYS? An experienced wound nurse discusses some contraindications.

 

ALWAYS, NEVER, When? My approach to V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy - NPWTi-d

 

Susan Menendez-Eastman, RN, CWCN, CPSN

Susan Menendez-Eastman, RN, CWCN, CPSN

I am a huge proponent of V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy, but I would NEVER endorse that you should ALWAYS use V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy to treat a wound.  There are only a handful of situations where I would NEVER consider use of the therapy.  Wound care is dynamic and should be considered a continuum where patients and wounds are kinetic – the status, and therefore the needs, change. Goals of care also change, so to say any wound care treatment or therapy should ALWAYS or NEVER be used would be closed minded and fail to address the variability of wound care and healing.

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Warm Wound Healing? It’s All About Foam Dressings

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Keeping a wound warm is an important part of wound care treatment, and foam dressing does the trick because it effectively maintains optimum temperatures and promotes healing. 

Foam for Warm Wound Healing

 

For wound care clinicians – and anyone else who ever treats wounds – it’s important to know that moist wounds heal faster. However, moisture on any surface (including wounds) will begin evaporating when exposed to air, and at a quicker rate as the surface cools. So the challenge of healing wounds effectively is to keep a wound moist and warm. Fortunately, foam dressings maintain optimum healing conditions, and help our patients heal faster.

Why warm is better

As wound tissues lose moisture, a cooling effect occurs in the wound. Because cells and enzymes function optimally at normal body temperature, a drop of just 2 °C is sufficient enough to negatively affect the biological healing process.

In fact, when a wound dressing is changed, it can take a wound base temperature up to four hours before it returns to normal. This is an important factor to consider when anticipating healing times, as well as when prepping your patient for a dressing change. Additionally, when tissue cooling occurs, it can lead to a higher risk of infection due to vasoconstriction, and hemoglobin’s increased need for oxygen. This, in turn, decreases the amount of oxygen available for neutrophils, which fight infection.

So how does this all tie in to dressings? By using the right type of dressings – and applying them properly – you can create an optimum environment for wound healing. The dressing that keeps the wound bed the warmest is foam.

Foam Dressing

Semipermeable polyurethane foam dressing is nonadherent and nonlinting. It has a hydrophobic or waterproof outer layer, and provides a moist wound environment. Other characteristics of foam dressing include:

  • It is permeable to water vapor, but blocks the entry of bacteria and contaminants
  • It can be purchased in various thicknesses, with or without adhesive border
  • It is available in pads, sheets, and cavity dressings

Consider using foam as primary or secondary dressing for partial- and full-thickness wounds, with minimal to heavy drainage. In addition, foam dressing:

  • Works well for granulating and epithelializing wounds
  • Provides insulation to keep wounds warm
  • As secondary dressing for wounds with packing
  • Can be used to absorb drainage around tubes
  • Helpful for hypergranulation tissue along with compression

The advantages to using foam dressing on wounds are that it:

  • Provides moist wound healing
  • Doesn’t adhere to the wound
  • Provides cushioning
  • Is easy to apply and remove
  • Can be used with infected wounds
  • Provides a bacterial barrier
  • Is effective with hypergranulation
  • Can be used under compression
  • Can be cut to accommodate tubes

The disadvantages to using foam dressing on wounds include:

  • It could be expensive if exudate requires daily dressing changes
  • Wound beds may desiccate if there is no exudate from the wound
  • A secondary dressing might be required
  • If it becomes saturated, it can lead to maceration of the periwound
  • It is contraindicated for use with third-degree burns, dry eschar, and sinus tracts

What do you think?

Knowing that moist and warm wounds heal faster obviously makes using the right dressings (and applying them properly) crucial to effective wound care. Do you regularly use foam dressings, and have you noticed a difference in healing time? And have you learned any special application techniques that help keep wounds at an optimum body temperature? We’d love to hear about your experiences – please leave your comments below.

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.

The Winter of 1962

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Why do we do what we do today in wound care? Modern wound management all started back in the 1960’s when Dr. George Winter found that wounds that were kept moist healed twice as fast. By keeping the wound environment moist it mimicked the natural environment of the cells in the body and we had decreased cell death, increased angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation, enhanced autolytic debridement, increased re-epithelialization and the patient had decreased pain. In short better wound healing was occurring with moist healing principles.  Moist_Dry_Wound_Healing

More studies continued and focused on water vapor loss, which lead to heat loss of the wound. The loss of moisture from any surface is accompanied by cooling of that surface, and when the wound loses tissue moisture there is cooling off the wound. Epidermal cells will only migrate over viable tissues; a dry crust or scab impedes the resurfacing process. Our wounds need to be maintained at or near normal body temperature to heal. A drop in temperature in the wound bed of 2°C is sufficient to alter healing and slow or stop healing, and it can take up to 4 hours for that wound to get back to normal healing temperature! As our wound cools off other negative things occur too, vasoconstriction occurs and the wound bed doesn’t get the needed blood and oxygen for our white blood cells to function effectively. This results in the white blood cells not being able to fight off bacteria, and the wound ends up at risk or with an actual infection.

In summary, for wound care, the 1960’s were really the start of something great! Faster healing times and better out comes for my patient! We now practice moist wound healing principles, we know the wound needs to be kept warm and moist, and needs to have a constant supply of oxygen to fight off infection.

Today we accomplish this with dressings that support moist wound healing. We use dressings that have the technology to be left in place for long periods of time and keep the wound bed warm. Long gone are the days of TID dressing changes, remember it takes the wound bed 4 hours to return to normal healing temperature! When it comes to modern day wound care, the 60’s is where we still are at!