Posts Tagged ‘NPUAP’

Wound Care News: National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announces a change in terminology

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Breaking Wound Care News

The term “pressure injury” replaces “pressure ulcer” in the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Injury Staging System, according to the NPUAP. The change in terminology more accurately describes pressure injuries to both intact and ulcerated skin. In the previous staging system Stage 1 and Deep Tissue Injury described injured intact skin, while the other stages described open ulcers. This led to confusion because the definitions for each of the stages referred to the injuries as “pressure ulcers”.

In addition to the change in terminology, Arabic numbers are now used in the names of the stages instead of Roman numerals. The term “suspected” has been removed from the Deep Tissue Injury diagnostic label. Additional pressure injury definitions agreed upon at the meeting included Medical Device Related Pressure Injury and Mucosal Membrane Pressure Injury.

CLICK HERE to read the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel’s full press release.

 

 

 

Real World Pressure Ulcers: Staging Can Be Tricky

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

This wound care Q&A answers five of the most common questions about pressure ulcer staging dilemmas (that you probably didn’t learn from textbooks).

Pressure Ulcer Staging

 

In the world of wound care, just as in real life, the phrase, “Expect the unexpected” couldn’t be more appropriate. Clinicians can do everything exactly by the book, only to find that a wound just won’t heal, or the source of the problem appears to be one thing but then ends up being another. This is especially true with pressure ulcers.

(more…)

Therapeutic Support Surfaces: The Past, The Present, and the Future

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

Therapeutic Support Surfaces

Therapeutic Support Surfaces:The Past, The Present and The Future will be presented by Rosalyn S. Jordan RN, BSN, MSc, CWOCN, WCC and National Alliance of Wound Care Board Director.

What is going on with support surfaces? Join us in this session and find out about the work of the Support Surface Standards Initiative, a committee of the NPUAP. This committee was convened in 2002 with a goal: to standardize support surface terms and definitions and to develop standardized tests that will be used to measure the different support surfaces, determine how this lends to clinical outcomes and to study the effectiveness of support surface therapy.

This session will be presented on Thursday September 8,2011 at 2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

For more Information about the Wound Care Education Institute and WOW 2011, Check out Wild on Wounds 2011 National Conference

Pressure Ulcer Stages (A Review)

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

The following is taken from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel’s website. As wound care certified professionals, are we all consistently documenting and defining the pressure ulcers correctly. We have included an excerpt from NPUAP’s site below.

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel has defined the definition of a pressure ulcer and the stages of pressure ulcers, including the original 4 stages and adding 2 stages on deep tissue injury and unstageable pressure ulcers. This work is the culmination of over 5 years of work beginning with the identification of deep tissue injury in 2001.

Pressure Ulcer Definition
A pressure ulcer is localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction. A number of contributing or confounding factors are also associated with pressure ulcers; the significance of these factors is yet to be elucidated.

Pressure Ulcer Stages

Suspected Deep Tissue Injury:

Purple or maroon localized area of discolored intact skin or blood-filled blister due to damage of underlying soft tissue from pressure and/or shear. The area may be preceded by tissue that is painful, firm, mushy, boggy, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue.

Further description:
Deep tissue injury may be difficult to detect in individuals with dark skin tones. Evolution may include a thin blister over a dark wound bed. The wound may further evolve and become covered by thin eschar. Evolution may be rapid exposing additional layers of tissue even with optimal treatment.

Stage I:
Intact skin with non-blanchable redness of a localized area usually over a bony prominence. Darkly pigmented skin may not have visible blanching; its color may differ from the surrounding area.

Further description:
The area may be painful, firm, soft, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue. Stage I may be difficult to detect in individuals with dark skin tones. May indicate “at risk” persons (a heralding sign of risk)

Stage II:
Partial thickness loss of dermis presenting as a shallow open ulcer with a red pink wound bed, without slough. May also present as an intact or open/ruptured serum-filled blister.

Further description:
Presents as a shiny or dry shallow ulcer without slough or bruising.* This stage should not be used to describe skin tears, tape burns, perineal dermatitis, maceration or excoriation.
*Bruising indicates suspected deep tissue injury

Stage III:
Full thickness tissue loss. Subcutaneous fat may be visible but bone, tendon or muscle are not exposed. Slough may be present but does not obscure the depth of tissue loss. May include undermining and tunneling.

Further description:
The depth of a stage III pressure ulcer varies by anatomical location. The bridge of the nose, ear, occiput and malleolus do not have subcutaneous tissue and stage III ulcers can be shallow. In contrast, areas of significant adiposity can develop extremely deep stage III pressure ulcers. Bone/tendon is not visible or directly palpable.

Stage IV:
Full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon or muscle. Slough or eschar may be present on some parts of the wound bed. Often include undermining and tunneling.

Further description:
The depth of a stage IV pressure ulcer varies by anatomical location. The bridge of the nose, ear, occiput and malleolus do not have subcutaneous tissue and these ulcers can be shallow. Stage IV ulcers can extend into muscle and/or supporting structures (e.g., fascia, tendon or joint capsule) making osteomyelitis possible. Exposed bone/tendon is visible or directly palpable.

Unstageable:
Full thickness tissue loss in which the base of the ulcer is covered by slough (yellow, tan, gray, green or brown) and/or eschar (tan, brown or black) in the wound bed.

Further description:

Until enough slough and/or eschar is removed to expose the base of the wound, the true depth, and therefore stage, cannot be determined. Stable (dry, adherent, intact without erythema or fluctuance) eschar on the heels serves as “the body’s natural (biological) cover” and should not be removed.

For more information about Pressure Ulcers and Staging and how to become Wound Care Certified, please visit our registration page.