Posts Tagged ‘Nutrition’

Nutrition and Wounds: The View From Both Sides

Friday, July 14th, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Nutrition is frequently conjoined to wound care lawsuits because patients often lose weight, so it is important to thoroughly document nutrition interventions and education.

 Nutrition and Wounds

 

Most pressure injury lawsuits begin as just that—a lawsuit initiated because of an acquired pressure injury. Usually the wound in question never healed to closure, became infected, led to an amputation, or otherwise caused the patient suffering. During the legal discovery process, all sorts of other care issues come to light, and the scope of the lawsuit grows. One of the most common additional issues is the patient’s nutritional status. Let’s look at it from both sides.

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Pressure Injury Prevention: Nutrition Matters

Friday, July 15th, 2016

(Adapted from  Nutrition and Wound Care by Amy Carrera, MD, RD, CNSC)

Proper nutrition is key when it comes to pressure injury prevention and effective wound care, no matter if it’s at home or in a health care facility.


Nutrition and Pressure Injury Prevention


Pressure injuries can occur in health care settings or at home, and affect more than 2.5 million Americans annually. The cost of treating just one Stage III or IV pressure injury may range anywhere from $5,000 to $50,000. Adequate nutrition status is paramount to wound prevention and helps to facilitate wound healing.

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Hot Topic at WOW – Nutrition Gems

Monday, October 6th, 2014
Dr. Nancy Collins PhD, RD, LD/N, FAPWCA, President/Executive Director Nutrition 411.com

Dr. Nancy Collins PhD, RD, LD/N, FAPWCA, President/Executive Director Nutrition 411.com

Dr. Nancy Collins received an overwhelming positive response from attendees after her lecture on “Nutrition Gems:  Hot topics in Nutrition”. One attendee remarked that she learned more from this one hour lecture than any previous presentation she has heard on this topic.

It was fascinating to hear about the advances in the field from an expert who has helped shape the current landscape yet remembers when her most common intervention when assessing wound patients nutritionally was to order “Milk and graham crackers!”

She covered a new development on the timing of when protein should be ingested based on recent research.
Breaking up protein ingestion at each meal has been shown to make it better available to the body to use verses protein loading at one meal, usually dinner. This can help our patients heal faster by providing the body with the protein it needs to build in that new tissue.

Did you know why Arginine and Glutamine, Conditionally Indispensable Amino Acids, are often need to be supplemented in the diet of our wound care patients?

Because under the stress of a wound, the body may not be able to keep up production of these important nutrients. Without adequate amounts of Arginine and Glutamine in the diet, the signaling pathway to build in new tissue is not activated and wound healing can stall.

Another key point made by Dr. Collins was the need to interpret lab data (Albumin, Pre-Albumin and Transferrin levels) only in conjunction with a full body nutritional assessment. These lab values have been shown to be inaccurate in patients with inflammation occurring in their bodies. Changes in Albumin, Pre-Albumin and Transferrin should not be used to suggest changes in protein status in individuals with acute or chronic inflammatory states. That can and should help all of us to do a better job in conducting a nutritional evaluation of our patients.

Dr. Collin’s passion for nutrition science and her ability to make it relevant to the wound care world was greatly appreciated by all who had the good fortune to attend this lecture.  To learn more about Dr. Collins go to: http://www.drnancycollins.com/