Posts Tagged ‘WCEI’

Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Even the best wound care detectives are challenged by this sneaky culprit that delays healing. Here’s how to identify biofilm bacteria and solve the case.

Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this wound-care case, we will try to find and invade the elusive biofilm bacterial hide-out. So the questions are: where are those microbes holed up, how do I know if they are even there, and how do I get rid of them?

Put on your Wound Detective hat – this one’s going to be tough. Even with your trusty magnifying glass, it’s not easy to spot the signs and symptoms of biofilm in your patients’ wounds.

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Cancer Patient’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Clearing drainage tubes for patients has gotten easier, thanks to a breast cancer patient’s husband and his invention, Tube-Evac.

Cancer Survivor’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

 

Clearing surgical tubes is a common procedure in wound care, and it often comes as second-nature for clinicians. But it can still be time-consuming and complicated. So imagine how daunting and difficult it is for friends or family members who have never done such a thing, and are responsible for a loved one’s after-surgery care.

Thanks to a loving and very creative husband, there is now a product available that makes the process of clearing tubes easier and faster. It’s called Tube-Evac, and we are happy to share its story.

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Ostomy Awareness Day: Let’s Talk Public Restrooms

Friday, September 30th, 2016

If you ever work with ostomy patients, you need to know about the Restroom Access Act, also known as Ally’s Law.

 

Ostomy Awareness Day: Let’s Talk Public Restrooms

Editor’s note: in her OstomyLife blog series, Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist Laura Cox, Shield HeatlhCare, shares lifestyle tips and information with fellow ostomates. After being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at the age of eighteen, Cox underwent ileostomy surgery in 2011. Today, you can find her one-on-one advice, support and insights on her blog, as well as other Shield HealthCare social media sites.

 

Whenever you, as a wound care clinician, are face-to-face with ostomy patients, you have the opportunity to make a difference. You are in the unique position to help arm them with information – and even confidence – when they leave your care. So in honor of Ostomy Awareness Day on Oct. 1, let’s talk about the important topic of public restrooms.

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Pressure Injuries with Cartilage? Stage Away

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

When it comes to wound care, staging pressure injuries with visible or palpable cartilage doesn’t have to be complicated. Here’s what to do.  

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(Photo: NPUAP copyright & used with permisson)

 

If you’ve ever treated wounds around the ear or in the area just below the bridge of the nose, you know how very little subcutaneous tissue there is. As a result, pressure injuries in these areas tend to be quite shallow, and they typically reveal cartilage.

So when encountering a pressure injury with visible or palpable cartilage, how should you stage it? We’ve got the answer.

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Wound Detective Series: When Wounds Won’t Heal

Friday, August 12th, 2016

Here’s how wound care detectives can solve the mystery of chronic wounds that fail to heal.

 

Epibole

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this case, our focus is on those chronic wounds that just won’t heal, including epibole (which happens in full thickness wounds). And as we know, this rolled wound edge inhibits healing. But why does this happen with some wounds and not others?

Put on your Wound Detective hat, get out your magnifying glass, and look for the signs and symptoms in your patient’s wound bed, including color, tissue type and odor.

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Diabetic Foot Screening Guide

Friday, July 29th, 2016

Five clinical tests for diagnosing loss of protective sensation in the diabetic foot, plus tips on inflammation assessment.

 

Diabetic Foot Screening Guide

 

How serious are diabetic foot ulcers? The statistics are sobering:

  • It is estimated that between 10 and 25% of patients with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer in their lifetime.
  • Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84% of all lower leg amputations.
  • The five-year mortality of patients with newly diagnosed diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is nearly 50%, and carries a worse prognosis than breast cancer, prostate cancer, or Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

In addition, DFUs are at increased risk for infections and other complications, and continue to be a major cause of hospitalizations and additional healthcare expenditures.  So while patients suffer greatly from DFUs, these chronic wounds are also a huge financial burden on healthcare systems. This is because these same patients spend more days in the hospital, and experience more visits to the emergency room and outpatient physician offices than other patients with diabetes.

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Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

How do you use hydrogel dressings to keep wounds moist without causing maceration? Very carefully.  

 

Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

 

If you’ve ever taken a long bath or spent an afternoon in a swimming pool, you’re familiar with what happens to your hands and feet: they become soft, white, and wrinkled up like prunes. This is a classic case of maceration, which occurs when skin tissue is exposed to excessive moisture over a period of time.

As clinicians, we regularly treat patients with wounds (which need to be kept moist) that are surrounded by tissue that needs to be kept dry. So knowing how to properly treat the wound without causing maceration makes all the difference in the healing process.
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Pressure Injury Prevention: Nutrition Matters

Friday, July 15th, 2016

(Adapted from  Nutrition and Wound Care by Amy Carrera, MD, RD, CNSC)

Proper nutrition is key when it comes to pressure injury prevention and effective wound care, no matter if it’s at home or in a health care facility.


Nutrition and Pressure Injury Prevention


Pressure injuries can occur in health care settings or at home, and affect more than 2.5 million Americans annually. The cost of treating just one Stage III or IV pressure injury may range anywhere from $5,000 to $50,000. Adequate nutrition status is paramount to wound prevention and helps to facilitate wound healing.

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Let’s Talk Ostomy Types

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

(Adapted from About Ostomies: Ostomy 101 by Shield Healthcare)

A comprehensive guide to the different types of ostomies, including colostomies, ileostomies, and urostomies.

Ostomy Types

Do you know your ostomy types? There are three kinds of bowel or bladder ostomies, and with this handy guide, you can brush up on each one – including the multiple sub-types. But first, let’s cover the basics.

Ostomy Surgery

Ostomy surgery is a surgical operation that redirects body wastes through a new outside opening, called a stoma. The stoma is a new exit point created to divert feces or urine. In some cases, multiple stomas are created to divert both. The term “ostomy” is used interchangeably by patients to refer to their medical condition, their stoma, and/or the appliance used to collect waste.

Intestinal ostomies are most often performed in conjunction with: tumor removal; to permit repair of bowel injuries; congenital defects; or as a last resort, treatment in medically unmanageable cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. Indications for urinary diversion include: tumor removal; congenital or nerve defects; or injuries that take away voluntary bladder control.

Types of Ostomies

There are three types of bowel or bladder ostomies, along with multiple sub-types:

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Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

Monday, June 13th, 2016

If you’re in the wound care industry, here’s what you need to know in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury – also known as MARSI.

Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

 

Here’s a quiz for all of you in wound care: how many medical adhesive injuries are reported each year in the United States? The answer is 1.5 million. That’s a lot of skin tears and other painful dermal injuries that might have been prevented.

The good news is that, with continued education, we can all play a part in decreasing tape-related wounds in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury (MARSI). This new descriptor in skin injury is definitely something you need to know.

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