Posts Tagged ‘Wild on Wounds National Conference’

Not Yo’ Grandma’s Stockings

Friday, May 27th, 2016

By Christopher Miles, OT, CLT, CWCA, medi USA

Compression garments aren’t what they used to be – and those of us in wound care couldn’t be happier.                                      Not Yo' Grandma's Stockings

Unfortunately, when patients think of compression garments they think of socks that are too tight and difficult to get on, or tend to roll and pinch. What they might not be thinking is that compression therapy is practically the only medical treatment likely to reduce the rate of recurrence of their nasty, painful and smelly venous leg ulcers.

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Destination WOW? Be a Poster Presenter

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

Wild on Wounds conference attendee shares a wound-care mystery through her first-ever poster abstract, and has a message for fellow clinicians: “Don’t give up!”

Susie Lee, RN WCC, was the 2015 WOW Grand Prize recipient in the poster presentations.

Susie Lee, RN WCC, was the 2015 WOW Grand Prize recipient in the poster presentations.

Susie Lee, RN WCC, traveled from Honolulu, Hawaii last year to attend the Wild on Wounds National Conference (WOW) for the first time, and all because of a challenging wound care case. A nurse for 38 years (and specializing in wound care for the past 10 years), she submitted a poster abstract in order to share her experience with fellow clinicians and conference attendees.

At the time, Susie had never created a clinical poster before, let alone one of such magnitude. And on top of that, she had never been asked to present a case for such a large audience. But this opportunity was a perfect fit for WOW attendees, because they love learning and finding ways to better help and care for wound care patients.

Little did she know that her entry (and all the hard work that went with it) would not only be a smashing success, she would go on to receive the coveted Grand Prize, plus a complimentary conference registration for WOW 2016. The icing on the cake was that she enjoyed learning more about her passion – wound care – in a lively, fun and inspirational environment while attending the WOW conference.

The Case

So what was Lee’s poster topic? It all started with an old wound that refused to heal. Located around a patient’s colostomy site, the wound was a tricky one, accompanied by intermittent appliance leakage. But the kicker? The patient wasn’t feeling pain.

“It was so frustrating,” says Lee. “The wound would get better for months at a time, but then suddenly flare up again. After trying different methods of treatment, none of which seemed to work I researched symptoms and scoured the Internet, looking for related articles, photos and any clue that might help find a solution. A  dermatologist could not provide any diagnosis, so I finally consulted with another wound care nurse colleague.”

Again, since the patient wasn’t feeling any pain, it was more difficult to diagnose. But finally Lee experienced an aha moment. She learned that the patient had suffered from a stroke on her left side (where the colostomy was), which had caused extensive nerve damage. This suddenly explained the patient’s lack of pain.

The diagnosis? Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum – a rare condition that causes large, painful ulcers to develop in the area surrounding an abdominal stoma. Working with a nurse practitioner, Lee decided to apply a high-dose of topical steroid cream. And guess what? It worked.

The WOW Experience

Although Lee’s case was difficult, the successful outcome – and the opportunity to share her story so that others might learn from it – inspired her to create the first poster presentation of her life. Being named the Grand Prize recipient was a surprise, for sure. But it was her message that meant even more. “The bottom line for me was to tell other clinicians that no matter how long it takes, don’t give up!” she says. “It’s such a great satisfaction to get a stubborn wound healed – for the patient, certainly, but also for you!”

Attending her first WOW conference was extra special because Lee’s daughter came with her to see the presentation. “It was kind of a role reversal,” she says. “My daughter came to see me participate in something. She was impressed with my poster, and it was nice for her to be proud of me, just like I’m always proud of her!”

As for her WOW trip, Lee says that she loved every minute. “I’ve been to other conferences, and they were really nice, but WOW is a whole other experience,” she says. “They had so many sessions and resources – on topics that I have to deal with every day. I met so many great people, and it was well worth the trip. WOW makes learning fun.”

A Little Background on Susie

Lee’s first class with the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) was in 2004, when she completed the Skin and Wound Management course presented by Nancy Morgan, WCEI Co-Founder.  Later, she sat for the Wound Care Certified Examination provided by National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy, and then became a WCC. “No doubt about it, my career path is a direct result of WCEI,” she says.

More about WOW

What have your experiences at WOW conferences been, and how many times have you attended? What were your favorite moments, sessions or experiences? Please leave your comments below. And if you’re interested in sharing the details of an unusual or particularly challenging case, get your 2016 Poster Submission Form here. We can’t wait to see you in Las Vegas!

To learn more about the case, “Atypical Presentation of Peristomal Pyoderma Gangrenosum,”  see Lee’s article in the Jan/Feb 2016 issue of Wound Care Advisor.

Wild On Wounds Exhibitor Showcase Vendor Spotlight

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Scott_Miller_MPM

MPM Medical Inc. brings to you industry experts for 2 days during the WOW conference in Las Vegas on September 2-5, 2015. They will answer your questions, perform product demonstrations and provide hands on product training.  All of their sales representatives have been trained and certified as Wound Care Market Specialists (CWCMS®) by the Wound Care Education Institute®.  They offer a comprehensive line of hydrogels with lidocaine, foam dressings, moisture barriers, antifungals, calcium alginates, waterproof composite dressings, woundgard bordered gauze pad dressings, multilayer composite dressings, cleansers, saturated gauze pads and collagen and super absorbent dressings.

MPM has published a number of practical reference pieces including a definitive Wound Management Guide, Wound Care Wall Charts and clinical studies.  For information on these educational pieces visit their website at: www.mpmmedicalinc.com

Register for WOW today and stop by the MPM booth #224

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What Will You Gain by Attending WOW?  You Will…

  • Discover what is new in wound care which is essential to your practice
  • Elevate your clinical skills with interactive, advanced, how-to sessions and hands-on workshops
  • Participate in product training with industry experts to advance your knowledge of wound care technologies
  • AND MORE…

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

WOW2015_600x155_FREE-TICKET_BANNER

REGISTER BY MAY 1ST – PAY BY JUNE 1ST

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

RegisterNowPay_LaterHeaderSave $100 when you register by May 1, 2015  
You’ll get first choice of conference sessions and…
You don’t pay until June 1st!

Industry and Clinical experts will provide training and product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions. Join us in Las Vegas, September 2 – 5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:
  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet dinner
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

register now    send a brochure

Wild On Wounds Conference Early Registration Savings

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Only_14_days

When you register early, you save $100 and you will have first choice in selecting all conference sessions. The early discount rate expires May 1, 2015.  Register today!

Industry and clinical experts will provide training, product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions.

Join us in Las Vegas, September 2-5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

course_header2WCEI2015_WCC_BUTTON_rev

WOUND CARE CERTIFICATION – This Wound Care Certified (WCC®) course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

WCEI2015_DWC_BUTTON_rev

DIABETIC WOUND CERTIFICATION – This Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

WCEI2015_OMS_BUTTON_revOSTOMY CERTIFICATION – This Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DETAILS

 

You Be The Judge…and Jury!

Monday, April 6th, 2015

The Verdict Is In_HeaderJ_Melendez_175x236

You Be The Judge…and The Jury!

Julia Melendez RN, BSN, JD, CWOCN
Ever wondered what it’s like to be in the courtroom defending the wound care you provided?  So what happens and how does it all work?
This session will feature a mock trial demonstration portraying pitfalls encountered in the courtroom. Brush up on your acting skills. We will be selecting participants from the audience to be the players in this lawsuit.

SESSION #403: You Be The Judge…and Jury (Interactive)  

Come join us at the Wild On Wounds National Conference September 2-5, 2015 in Las Vegas, where you will learn the current standards of care in skin and wound management. Choose from a variety of essential to advanced educational sessions which include hands-on workshops, “learn it today and do it tomorrow” training, and interactive sessions.

Spend 3+ days with onside industry experts who will provide answers to your challenging wound healing questions, one-on-one product demonstrations, and hands-on training.

register nowsend a brochure

Save $100

if you register by May 1, 2015

 

course_header2

wcc_tile

 

Wound Care Certification

This course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

 

DWC_tile

 

Diabetic Wound Certification

This course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

 

OMS_tile

 

Ostomy Management Specialist Certification

This course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

To register for a course visit  www.wcei.net

 

Wild On Wounds National Conference Registration is Open!

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

banner_Register_Today

We as clinicians are responsible for the care of our patients’ skin …   SKIN IS IN!

Come join us at the Wild On Wounds National Conference September 2 – 5, 2015 in Las Vegas where you will learn the current standards of care in skin and wound management.  Choose from a variety of essential to advanced educational sessions which include hands-on workshops, “learn it today and do it tomorrow” training, and interactive sessions.

Spend 3+ days with onsite industry experts who will provide answers to your challenging wound healing questions, one-on-one product demonstrations and hands-on training.

Take advantage of the early discount rate and receive a $100 discount off the standard $550 rate when you register by May 1, 2015.

FULL CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INCLUDES:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3 ½ days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • Free cyber café with internet access to check emails and more
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And MORE!

register now  send a brochure

 

 

 

 

 

Questions? call 1-888-318-8536 or email diana@wcei.net

 

 

A Stinky Situation: When Wound Odor is a Problem

Monday, November 10th, 2014

You may have become desensitized to it, but If your patient has odor in the wound bed, consider it a problem that you need to fix.

A Stinky Situation: When Wound Odor is a Problem

 

As healthcare clinicians, in a way, we are lucky.  We become desensitized to things we encounter over and over again, they just don’t bother us like the first time we were exposed. This stands true for those wounds with odor. We almost become immune, yes we are aware the odor is there; but to our noses it is not an issue. The real issue is for our patients and their friends and family. Odor is subjective. Depending on the patient and family members ability, they may be very much aware of the odor. It can be very bothersome to the patient and their loved ones. The patient maybe embarrassed by it, and may try to self-isolate. They may not want to have people around them because of the way their wound smells. This is something as wound care clinicians we need to fix.

The first thing we need to look at is, what is causing the odor? Is it from necrotic tissue that supports the growth of anaerobic bacteria? Is it from a high level of wound exudate? Is there an actual wound infection? Do we have the wrong wound dressing on the patient?

Once we figure out the cause then we need to remove it, whether its debridement of necrotic tissue, managing the high level of exudate with dressings or using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; we need to find what works.  With an actual wound infection, treating with antimicrobial dressings or antiseptic’s/antibiotic’s are a must to remove the organism causing the infection and the odor. Sometimes just changing the dressing more frequently will help.  Using dressings like those with activated charcoal, or those dressings with medical grade honey in them may help the wound odor. Another option is topical Metronidazole Gel to the wound bed, this may help eliminate wound odor as well.

Just because the odor in the wound bed isn’t offensive to us as wound care clinicians, doesn’t mean it isn’t offensive to others. As a rule, if your patient has odor in the wound bed, consider it a problem that you need to fix.

 

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and OstomyManagement. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.

 

Diabetic Ulcers – Identification and Treatment

Monday, October 27th, 2014
Gail Hebert RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, LNHA, Clinical Instructor

Gail Hebert RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, LNHA, Clinical Instructor

Don’t miss this energetic webinar brought to you by Wound Care Education Institute®:  Another popular session recorded from the Wild On Wounds National Conference and providing continuing education credit.

Chronic foot ulcers in patients with diabetes cause substantial morbidity and may lead to amputation of a lower extremity and mortality. Accurate identification of underlying causes and co-morbidities are essential for planning treatment and approaches for optimal healing. In this one-hour recorded session, Gail Hebert will review evidence-based approaches for identification and treatment of chronic neuropathic, neuro-ischemic and ischemic diabetic foot ulcerations.

Wound Care Education Institute is featuring various webinars on topics from this years’ conference.  TO REGISTER CLICK HERE or visit www.wcei.net/webinars.

 

WHY ABI?

Monday, October 20th, 2014

What exactly is an ABI?  ABI stands for Ankle Brachial Index. This is a non-invasive bedside tool that compares the systolic blood pressure of the ankle to that of Doppler_BloodPressureCuffthe arm. It is done to rule out Peripheral Arterial Disease in the lower extremities. The ABI is considered the “bedside” gold standard diagnostic test and can be done by any trained clinician in a clinic, hospital, nursing home and/or even the home care setting. All you need is a blood pressure cuff and a hand held Doppler.

Why do we do the Ankle Brachial Index or ABI?  Well, there are several reasons why we include the ABI as part of our assessment for the patient with lower extremity wounds. First of all, in order to heal a wound we have to be sure that our patient has adequate blood flow. The ABI will tell us if the patient has impaired arterial blood flow, and how significant that impairment is.  We also need to know the amount of compression that we can safely apply to the venous patient, in general the lower the patients ABI reading, the lower the amount of compression that can be safely applied.

When do I need to do the ABI? Standards of care and Guidelines dictate when we should be doing the Ankle Brachial Index. Our current standard of practice states to do the ABI: Anytime a patient has a lower extremity ulcer, when foot pulses are not clearly palpable, prior to applying compression wraps / garments or when the lower extremity ulcer is no longer healing.

What does the ABI “number” mean? First we need to be aware that not everyone’s ABI is reliable, in fact patients with diabetes or end-stage renal disease may have incompressible vessels rendering a falsely high ABI score. For these patients we use another diagnostic test called the Toe Brachial toe_cuf_wound_care_education_institutePressure Index (TBPI) instead of the ABI.  For those with ABI readings, in general as the patients ABI score decreases, this signifies that the patient has arterial disease of the lower extremity, and poor blood flow. Any patient with an abnormal reading needs a referral to a vascular specialist. Bedside interpretations of the ABI that we use as wound clinicians are: 1.0 considered a normal reading, an ABI of 0.9 indicate more venous, 0.6-0.8 indicate a mixed etiology (venous and arterial) and less than or equal to 0.5 is indicative of arterial disease of the lower extremity.

We as wound care clinicians are held to certain standards of care and must follow those guidelines established by the experts.  Performing the ABI on patients before applying compression and on patients with lower extremity ulcers is one of them.  As wound clinicians we use the ABI and our clinical assessment to help guide us into determining what type of ulcer we are dealing with so we can make appropriate referrals and develop the best treatment plan for our patients. It’s a step we can’t afford to leave out; our patient’s limb may depend on it.