Posts Tagged ‘Wound Care Dressings’

Wild on Wounds Contest Winner!

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Congratulations to Gayle Audenried from Moab Regional Hospital in Moab Utah. She is the winner of the “Why I Want To Go To WOW” contest.  Gayle receives an all expense Contest Winnerpaid trip to Las Vegas to attend the 2012 Wild on Wounds Conference at the Caesars Palace Hotel.  Each participant submitted a 3 minute video telling our alumni why they wanted to go to WOW.  Gayle’s video received over 400 votes. Her creativity really paid off.  To view Gayle’s video click here.

We also wish to thank our other participants.  Lona Gless, Andrea Hinojos and Sharon Pavelka.

Wild on Wounds Conference is being held September 12-15, 2012 in Las Vegas at the Caesars Palace.  Details can be found at www.woundseminar.com.

ACTION BANDAGE offers convenience and ensures patient comfort

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Action Bandage
Action Bandage LLC

Description: bandage system that holds sub bandages and other medical devices such as IVs and PICC lines in place for an extended period of time without the use of adhesives or tapes. Designed to fit a number of different body parts, the bandage system is reusable, offers easy on and off convenience, and eliminates use of tapes and adhesives ensuring patient comfort.

How to apply:

  1. Clean and dress affected area
  2. Hold Action Bandage vertically and open the top end with both hands.
  3. Roll the bandage downward creating a doughnut shape.
  4. Stretch the doughnut-shaped bandage from the center and place near affected area.
  5. Unroll the bandage over the affected area.
  6. Adjust the bandage so the air holes are equal in shape and size.

Website:  http://www.actionbandage.com

There are all kinds of innovative wound care dressings and supplies coming to market. Are you on top of them all?

For more information about becoming wound care certified, please visit WCEI at http://www.wcei.net

Wound Care Utility Belt

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

Ok Wound Care Certified Heroes, here is a blog post for you! I was playing with my kids this weekend and reflecting upon my childhood. The toys and tools that the kids were playing and using was one of the topics of discussion among the adults. Despite sharing some nostalgia with one of my daughters from when I was a whipper snapper and hearing her laugh as I educated her as to what an Audio Tape was and that it contained music that one could listen to on a “Walkman”, I found myself thinking of Wound Care. As the laughter continued, we all discussed ‘tools’ of trade.

As a fan of Superhero Comics, you know Batman and Superman and the like, I was pondering over their super powers and tools that they use to fight the evil villains and arch enemies. Much like those super heroes, Wound Care Certified Professionals are Heroes that fight similar nemeses daily. So the questions to you, heroes, are “What tools do you use daily in your fight against wounds?” “What do you keep in your ‘Utility Belt’ arsenal?”

Is there something you use in your daily practices that you just can’t do without? What are your tools of choice? Have you been having success with any particular dressings or devices? What say you? Naturally, there are various categories of dressings and some of which we have reviewed here at the Wound care Education Institute over the past few weeks. We will continue to revisit these and discuss these tools to help heal and treat wounds.

For more information about becoming Wound Care Certified and our Skin and Wound Management Course, please visit WCEI’s Registration Page

Wound Care Dressings: Hydrocolloids

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

In this series, we are featuring Types of Dressings. As Wound Care Certified professionals, we should be aware of the types of wound care dressings that are available to us to treat the patients in our care. Wound Care Dressings come in various shapes, sizes and have indications for their use.

Hydrocolloid Dressings

Hydrocolloid Dressings

Hydrocolloid Dressings


Description Hydrocolloid Dressings:
Contain hydrophilic colloidal particles in an adhesive compound laminated onto a flexible water resistant outer layer. Moisture from the wound causing the wafer to form a gel over the wound. Available in various sizes, shapes, thickness, and absorption capabilities.


Function of Hydrocolloid Dressings:
Occlusive wafer dressings which cover the wound and prevent oxygen, bacteria or fluids from interacting with the wound. Promotes a moist wound environment and autolytic debridement.

When to Use Hydrocolloid Dressings:

* Intact skin or newly healed wounds as prevention

* Non-infected wounds with scant to moderate drainage

* Partial or full thickness wounds

* Dry or moist wound bed


Contraindications of Hydrocolloid Dressings:

* Full thickness burns

* Wounds with heavy drainage

* Fragile peri-wound

* Infected wounds

* Fungal lesions, herpetic lesions

* Wounds with deep tunnels, tracts and undermining

Advantages of Hydrocolloid Dressings: Adhesive and moldable, reduce pain, provide moisture barrier, provide moist wound healing, autolytic debridement and are easy to apply. It is very effective at promoting granulation and epithelialization. Good bacterial and environmental barrier.


Disadvantages of Hydrocolloid Dressings

* The dressing may dislodge with shearing or friction.

* Not recommended for infected wounds. Dislodges with heavy drainage. Odor when removed. May injure fragile skin.

Reminders

* Change every 3-7 days as needed.
* Apply wafer 1-2 inches larger than wound.
* Monitor for peri-wound maceration.
* Upon removal, dressing residue may be noted on wound. (It is not necessary to remove residual.)
* Distinct odor may be noted upon dressing removal. Clean wound, before assessment.
* Use EXTREME VIGILANCE if used on diabetic feet.
* May secure edges with tape, if necessary.
* Daily dressing changes are not appropriate.
* Warm hydrocolloid sheets (e.g. between the hands) prior to application as this aids effective adhesion and makes the dressing more pliable.

For more information about wound care dressings or becoming Wound Care Certified, please visit WCEI.net

Wound Care Dressings: Hydrogels

Thursday, November 12th, 2009

In this series, we are featuring Types of Dressings. As Wound Care Certified professionals, we should be aware of the types of wound care dressings that are available to us to treat the patients in our care. Wound Care Dressings come in various shapes, sizes and have indications for their use.

Hydrogel Dressings

Hydrogel Sheet

Hydrogel Sheet

Description of Hydrogel Dressings: A three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers containing varying percentages of water, that bind great volumes of liquid due to the presence of hydrophilic residues. Hydrophilic properties enable them to absorb excess exudate while producing a moist wound environment. Formulations may vary, either glycerin based or contain 90% water in a gel base. They are available in a sheets, gel, sprays, impregnated gauze or packing strips.

Function of Hydrogel Dressings: They provide for moist wound healing, autolytic debridement and are able to absorb a minimal amount of fluid. Hydrogels add moisture to the wound bed, are non-adherent and assist with pain relief when applied cold.

When to Use Hydrogel Dressings:

* Partial and full thickness wounds that are dry or moist

* Granulating wounds

* Abrasions, partial thickness burns

* Skin reactions to radiation

* Necrotic wound and wounds covered with eschar

Hydrogel Applicator

Hydrogel Applicator


Contraindications of Hydrogel Dressings

* Full thickness burns

* Moderate to highly draining wounds

Advantages of Hydrogel Dressings:

* Cooling and soothing

* May be used on infected wounds.

* Provides hydration of eschar and nonviable tissue to promote debridement.

* Facilitates wound repair and epithelialization.

Disadvantages of Hydrogel Dressings:

* Gel sheets: Must be cut to exact size of wound to prevent maceration of surrounding tissue.

* Requires a secondary dressing cover.

* Dehydrate if not covered.

Hydrogel on a Finger

Hydrogel on a Finger


Reminders

* Care must be taken to avoid macerating surrounding skin.
* Utilize for light to moderate absorption.
* Clean wound between dressing changes with normal saline or per manufacturers recommendations.
* Dressing changes every 1-4 days as needed.
* For Radiation burns: Dressing may be stored in refrigerator and applied to wound cold, to provide soothing and pain reduction

For more information about wound care dressings or Wound Care Certifification, please visit WCEI.net

Wound Care Dressings: Foams

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

In this series, we are featuring Types of Dressings. As Wound Care Certified professionals, we should be aware of the types of wound care dressings that are available to us to treat the patients in our care. Wound Care Dressings come in various shapes, sizes and have indications for their use.

Foams:

Foam Dressing

Foam Dressing

Description of Foam Dressings:: Semi-permeable polyurethane foam dressings, non-adherent or semi-adherent contact layer, and hydrophobic or water proof outer layer

Function of Foam Dressings: Provide moist wound environment and thermal insulation, are non-adherent, absorptive capabilities vary depending on type and manufacturer, used for reduction of hyper-granulation tissue.

When to Use to use Foam Dressings:

* Moist Partial or full thickness wounds
* Light to moderate exudate
* Red, granular wounds
* Wounds with necrotic tissue that is softened

Foam Dressings

Foam Dressings

Contraindications of Foam Dressings:

* Dry Wounds
* Third Degree Burns

Advantages of Foam Dressings:

* Provides Moist Wound Healing
* Variety of Shapes and Sizes
* Provides Thermal Insulation

Disadvantages of Foam Dressings:

* The dressing is expensive if a daily dressing is required
* The wound may desiccate if there is no exudate from the wound

Foam Dressings

Foam Dressings

Reminders:

* Dressing should be 1 – 2 inches larger than wound.
* Change every 3 – 7 days or as necessary
* May require a secondary or cover dressing to hold in place.

For more information about wound care or becoming Wound care Certified, please visit the Wound Care Education Institute’s Registration Page

Wound Care Dressings: Alginates

Sunday, November 8th, 2009

In this series, we will feature Types of Dressings. As Wound Care Certified professionals, we should be aware of the types of wound care dressings that are available to us to treat the patients in our care. Wound Care Dressings come in various shapes, sizes and have indications for their use.

Alginates

Alginates

Alginates

Description :Highly absorbent, biodegradable, Derived from brown seaweed, spun into rope or flat dressing form. The high absorption is achieved via strong hydrophilic gel formation which limits wound secretions and minimizes bacterial contamination.

* Function Alginates form a gel in the wound base when they come in contact with and mix with the wound exudate. Alginate fibers trapped in a wound are readily biodegraded.

* When to Use: Draining partial thickness wound ,Draining full thickness wound Wounds with moderate to heavy exudates, Must be used in moist wounds

* Contraindications Third degree burns, Eschar covered wound, Minimal draining wounds, Dry wounds

* Advantages: Moldable, absorbent, non-adhesive, provide moist wound healing environment, easy to use, and absorbs excessive drainage.

* Disadvantages :If wound bed is dry the dressing will not form gel and may adhere to tissue causing trauma, expensive to use in large wounds, may dehydrate wound.

Reminders

* Irrigate wound with normal saline or pH balanced surfactant cleanser between dressing changes.

* Utilize in moderate to heavily draining wounds, not for use in a dry wound.

* Cover with secondary dressing.

* Change as needed, usually 1-3 days depending upon drainage.

It is inappropriate to moisten this product before using or to use with Hydrogel.

For more information about becoming Wound Care Certified, please visit WCEI.net

Bill Richlen PT, WCC, CWS discusses types of wound care dressings

Monday, July 27th, 2009

Wound Care Education Institute Instructor Bill Richlen PT, WCC, WCS discusses various types of wound care dressings and treatments with a class in Pittsburgh PA. For more information about becoming Wound Care Certified, check out http://www.wcei.net

Wound Care Dressings: Hydrogel Dressings

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

In our day to day practices of wound care we deal with many types of wound care dressings. Today we will focus on Hydrogel Dressings.

NDM-409020-si

Description A three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers containing varying percentages of water, that bind great volumes of liquid due to the presence of hydrophilic residues. Hydrophilic properties enable them to absorb excess exudate while producing a moist wound environment. Formulations may vary, either glycerin based or contain 90% water in a gel base.  They are available in a sheets, gel, sprays, impregnated gauze or packing strips.

Function They provide for moist wound healing, autolytic debridement and are able to absorb a minimal amount of fluid. Hydrogels add moisture to the wound bed, are non-adherent and assist with pain relief when applied cold.

Hydrogel

When to Use:

  • Partial and full thickness wounds that are dry or moist
  • Granulating wounds

  • Abrasions, partial thickness burns
  • Skin reactions to radiation
  • Necrotic wound and wounds covered with eschar

Contraindications

  • Full thickness burns
  • Moderate to highly draining wounds

Advantages

  • Cooling and soothing
  • May be used on infected wounds.
  • Provides hydration of eschar and nonviable tissue to promote debridement.
  • Facilitates wound repair and epithelialization.

Disadvantages

  • Gel sheets: Must be cut to exact size of wound to prevent maceration of surrounding tissue.
  • Requires a secondary dressing cover.
  • Dehydrate if not covered.

Reminders

  • Care must be taken to avoid macerating surrounding skin.
  • Utilize for light to moderate absorption.
  • Clean wound between dressing changes with normal saline or per manufacturers recommendations.
  • Dressing changes every 1-4 days as needed.
  • For Radiation burns: Dressing may be stored in refrigerator and applied to wound cold, to provide soothing and pain reduction

As health care workers and wound care professionals we encounter patients with wounds. It is pertinent that we remain aware of the types of dressings available to us and their indications as well as contraindications for use. If you would like more information on how to use these dressings, consider becoming Wound Care Certified. Check out WCEI’s Course Info here