Posts Tagged ‘Wound Care Education Institute’

You know you’re a wound care clinician when…

Friday, November 27th, 2015

Wound care clinicians are a unique group of professionals with special superpowers:  X-ray vision into the depths of the wound, the ability to smell every type of bacteria, and the drive to heal every wound, no matter what it takes.  Does this sound like you?

1.  You can eat pizza while viewing wound photos.

Eating pizza while reviewing wound photos

 

 

 

2.  You check your pet’s water dish for a slimy biofilm.

Drinking dog

 

 

 

3.  You start naming off anatomy while preparing turkey.

Turkey anatomy lesson

 

 

 

4.  You study the street maggots in the trash and think about how great medical maggots are at debriding wounds

Street maggots

 

 

 

5.  You look at a dressing and wish you could add bling.

Boo Boo Bling

photo courtesy of www.boobooblingshop.com.

 

 

 

6.  Your family can’t handle your workday stories at the dinner table.

Grossing our the family at dinner table

 

If you found yourself nodding, you’re clearly a “Wild on Wounds” superhero.  Keep on healing and have a WOUNDerful day!

Wound Care: Turning Frequency for At-Risk Patients

Friday, September 18th, 2015

What’s the right frequency for turning and repositioning your at-risk patients? Turns out, there’s more than one answer.

Patient Turning FrequencyIf you ask most clinicians what the correct frequency for turning at-risk patients is, the answer is probably going to be an automatic, “Every two hours!” Clinicians seem to have been born with that guideline ingrained in our heads.

But we know that when it comes to proper turning frequency, there is actually quite a bit more involved when finding the best solution.  Some of our patients’ tissue would break down if left in the same position for that length of time. So if two hours isn’t appropriate for some, how do we go about determining the correct turning frequency for at-risk patients?

Official Guidelines Say …

According to the 2014 International Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers, turning frequency should be determined by considering your patients tissue tolerance, level of activity and mobility, general medical condition, overall treatment objectives, skin condition and comfort. The frequency of turns should be individualized to your patient, so the standard belief that q 2 hour turns is going to work for all your patents is false.

How do you determine tissue tolerance?

Assessing tissue tolerance allows clinicians to determine how long the skin can tolerate pressure without showing negative impacts in the form of reddened skin. It is done by implementing a step-by-step procedure where the clinician incrementally increases the amount of time the patient is left in the same position until reddened skin is detected, and recording these findings. Once the length of time it takes to see the skin redden is determined, you set the turning frequency to 30 minutes less than that time interval.

For example, if a patient shows reddened skin after 90 minutes, then turning frequency would be each hour. Tissue tolerance results will vary for each patient. The other factors mentioned above (mobility, medical condition, etc.) should also be considered, as they can impact your decisions with turning frequency.

There’s no definitive answer.

What this means for clinicians is that we need to change our thinking about how often our patients should be turned.  The answer to the question “How often do you turn and reposition your patient?” should now be, “At a minimum of 2 q hours and more often if needed.”

What do you think?

Do you currently test for tissue tolerance on your patients?  If so, do you record the results of these trials in the medical record? In Long Term Care, have you had surveyors ask about the method you use to determine turning frequency for your patients? We’d love to hear about your experiences with this topic – please leave your comments below.

 

Wild On Wounds Exhibitor Showcase Vendor Spotlight

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Scott_Miller_MPM

MPM Medical Inc. brings to you industry experts for 2 days during the WOW conference in Las Vegas on September 2-5, 2015. They will answer your questions, perform product demonstrations and provide hands on product training.  All of their sales representatives have been trained and certified as Wound Care Market Specialists (CWCMS®) by the Wound Care Education Institute®.  They offer a comprehensive line of hydrogels with lidocaine, foam dressings, moisture barriers, antifungals, calcium alginates, waterproof composite dressings, woundgard bordered gauze pad dressings, multilayer composite dressings, cleansers, saturated gauze pads and collagen and super absorbent dressings.

MPM has published a number of practical reference pieces including a definitive Wound Management Guide, Wound Care Wall Charts and clinical studies.  For information on these educational pieces visit their website at: www.mpmmedicalinc.com

Register for WOW today and stop by the MPM booth #224

WOW_link_button

 

What Will You Gain by Attending WOW?  You Will…

  • Discover what is new in wound care which is essential to your practice
  • Elevate your clinical skills with interactive, advanced, how-to sessions and hands-on workshops
  • Participate in product training with industry experts to advance your knowledge of wound care technologies
  • AND MORE…

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

WOW2015_600x155_FREE-TICKET_BANNER

REGISTER BY MAY 1ST – PAY BY JUNE 1ST

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

RegisterNowPay_LaterHeaderSave $100 when you register by May 1, 2015  
You’ll get first choice of conference sessions and…
You don’t pay until June 1st!

Industry and Clinical experts will provide training and product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions. Join us in Las Vegas, September 2 – 5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:
  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet dinner
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

register now    send a brochure

Wild On Wounds Conference Early Registration Savings

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Only_14_days

When you register early, you save $100 and you will have first choice in selecting all conference sessions. The early discount rate expires May 1, 2015.  Register today!

Industry and clinical experts will provide training, product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions.

Join us in Las Vegas, September 2-5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

course_header2WCEI2015_WCC_BUTTON_rev

WOUND CARE CERTIFICATION – This Wound Care Certified (WCC®) course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

WCEI2015_DWC_BUTTON_rev

DIABETIC WOUND CERTIFICATION – This Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

WCEI2015_OMS_BUTTON_revOSTOMY CERTIFICATION – This Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DETAILS

 

You Be The Judge…and Jury!

Monday, April 6th, 2015

The Verdict Is In_HeaderJ_Melendez_175x236

You Be The Judge…and The Jury!

Julia Melendez RN, BSN, JD, CWOCN
Ever wondered what it’s like to be in the courtroom defending the wound care you provided?  So what happens and how does it all work?
This session will feature a mock trial demonstration portraying pitfalls encountered in the courtroom. Brush up on your acting skills. We will be selecting participants from the audience to be the players in this lawsuit.

SESSION #403: You Be The Judge…and Jury (Interactive)  

Come join us at the Wild On Wounds National Conference September 2-5, 2015 in Las Vegas, where you will learn the current standards of care in skin and wound management. Choose from a variety of essential to advanced educational sessions which include hands-on workshops, “learn it today and do it tomorrow” training, and interactive sessions.

Spend 3+ days with onside industry experts who will provide answers to your challenging wound healing questions, one-on-one product demonstrations, and hands-on training.

register nowsend a brochure

Save $100

if you register by May 1, 2015

 

course_header2

wcc_tile

 

Wound Care Certification

This course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

 

DWC_tile

 

Diabetic Wound Certification

This course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

 

OMS_tile

 

Ostomy Management Specialist Certification

This course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

To register for a course visit  www.wcei.net

 

A Stinky Situation: When Wound Odor is a Problem

Monday, November 10th, 2014

You may have become desensitized to it, but If your patient has odor in the wound bed, consider it a problem that you need to fix.

A Stinky Situation: When Wound Odor is a Problem

 

As healthcare clinicians, in a way, we are lucky.  We become desensitized to things we encounter over and over again, they just don’t bother us like the first time we were exposed. This stands true for those wounds with odor. We almost become immune, yes we are aware the odor is there; but to our noses it is not an issue. The real issue is for our patients and their friends and family. Odor is subjective. Depending on the patient and family members ability, they may be very much aware of the odor. It can be very bothersome to the patient and their loved ones. The patient maybe embarrassed by it, and may try to self-isolate. They may not want to have people around them because of the way their wound smells. This is something as wound care clinicians we need to fix.

The first thing we need to look at is, what is causing the odor? Is it from necrotic tissue that supports the growth of anaerobic bacteria? Is it from a high level of wound exudate? Is there an actual wound infection? Do we have the wrong wound dressing on the patient?

Once we figure out the cause then we need to remove it, whether its debridement of necrotic tissue, managing the high level of exudate with dressings or using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; we need to find what works.  With an actual wound infection, treating with antimicrobial dressings or antiseptic’s/antibiotic’s are a must to remove the organism causing the infection and the odor. Sometimes just changing the dressing more frequently will help.  Using dressings like those with activated charcoal, or those dressings with medical grade honey in them may help the wound odor. Another option is topical Metronidazole Gel to the wound bed, this may help eliminate wound odor as well.

Just because the odor in the wound bed isn’t offensive to us as wound care clinicians, doesn’t mean it isn’t offensive to others. As a rule, if your patient has odor in the wound bed, consider it a problem that you need to fix.

 

Wound Care Education Institute® provides online and onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and OstomyManagement. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and OMS national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®). For more information see wcei.net.

 

The Winter of 1962

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Why do we do what we do today in wound care? Modern wound management all started back in the 1960’s when Dr. George Winter found that wounds that were kept moist healed twice as fast. By keeping the wound environment moist it mimicked the natural environment of the cells in the body and we had decreased cell death, increased angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation, enhanced autolytic debridement, increased re-epithelialization and the patient had decreased pain. In short better wound healing was occurring with moist healing principles.  Moist_Dry_Wound_Healing

More studies continued and focused on water vapor loss, which lead to heat loss of the wound. The loss of moisture from any surface is accompanied by cooling of that surface, and when the wound loses tissue moisture there is cooling off the wound. Epidermal cells will only migrate over viable tissues; a dry crust or scab impedes the resurfacing process. Our wounds need to be maintained at or near normal body temperature to heal. A drop in temperature in the wound bed of 2°C is sufficient to alter healing and slow or stop healing, and it can take up to 4 hours for that wound to get back to normal healing temperature! As our wound cools off other negative things occur too, vasoconstriction occurs and the wound bed doesn’t get the needed blood and oxygen for our white blood cells to function effectively. This results in the white blood cells not being able to fight off bacteria, and the wound ends up at risk or with an actual infection.

In summary, for wound care, the 1960’s were really the start of something great! Faster healing times and better out comes for my patient! We now practice moist wound healing principles, we know the wound needs to be kept warm and moist, and needs to have a constant supply of oxygen to fight off infection.

Today we accomplish this with dressings that support moist wound healing. We use dressings that have the technology to be left in place for long periods of time and keep the wound bed warm. Long gone are the days of TID dressing changes, remember it takes the wound bed 4 hours to return to normal healing temperature! When it comes to modern day wound care, the 60’s is where we still are at!

 

Diabetic Ulcers – Identification and Treatment

Monday, October 27th, 2014
Gail Hebert RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, LNHA, Clinical Instructor

Gail Hebert RN, BS, MS, CWCN, WCC, DWC, OMS, LNHA, Clinical Instructor

Don’t miss this energetic webinar brought to you by Wound Care Education Institute®:  Another popular session recorded from the Wild On Wounds National Conference and providing continuing education credit.

Chronic foot ulcers in patients with diabetes cause substantial morbidity and may lead to amputation of a lower extremity and mortality. Accurate identification of underlying causes and co-morbidities are essential for planning treatment and approaches for optimal healing. In this one-hour recorded session, Gail Hebert will review evidence-based approaches for identification and treatment of chronic neuropathic, neuro-ischemic and ischemic diabetic foot ulcerations.

Wound Care Education Institute is featuring various webinars on topics from this years’ conference.  TO REGISTER CLICK HERE or visit www.wcei.net/webinars.

 

WHY ABI?

Monday, October 20th, 2014

What exactly is an ABI?  ABI stands for Ankle Brachial Index. This is a non-invasive bedside tool that compares the systolic blood pressure of the ankle to that of Doppler_BloodPressureCuffthe arm. It is done to rule out Peripheral Arterial Disease in the lower extremities. The ABI is considered the “bedside” gold standard diagnostic test and can be done by any trained clinician in a clinic, hospital, nursing home and/or even the home care setting. All you need is a blood pressure cuff and a hand held Doppler.

Why do we do the Ankle Brachial Index or ABI?  Well, there are several reasons why we include the ABI as part of our assessment for the patient with lower extremity wounds. First of all, in order to heal a wound we have to be sure that our patient has adequate blood flow. The ABI will tell us if the patient has impaired arterial blood flow, and how significant that impairment is.  We also need to know the amount of compression that we can safely apply to the venous patient, in general the lower the patients ABI reading, the lower the amount of compression that can be safely applied.

When do I need to do the ABI? Standards of care and Guidelines dictate when we should be doing the Ankle Brachial Index. Our current standard of practice states to do the ABI: Anytime a patient has a lower extremity ulcer, when foot pulses are not clearly palpable, prior to applying compression wraps / garments or when the lower extremity ulcer is no longer healing.

What does the ABI “number” mean? First we need to be aware that not everyone’s ABI is reliable, in fact patients with diabetes or end-stage renal disease may have incompressible vessels rendering a falsely high ABI score. For these patients we use another diagnostic test called the Toe Brachial toe_cuf_wound_care_education_institutePressure Index (TBPI) instead of the ABI.  For those with ABI readings, in general as the patients ABI score decreases, this signifies that the patient has arterial disease of the lower extremity, and poor blood flow. Any patient with an abnormal reading needs a referral to a vascular specialist. Bedside interpretations of the ABI that we use as wound clinicians are: 1.0 considered a normal reading, an ABI of 0.9 indicate more venous, 0.6-0.8 indicate a mixed etiology (venous and arterial) and less than or equal to 0.5 is indicative of arterial disease of the lower extremity.

We as wound care clinicians are held to certain standards of care and must follow those guidelines established by the experts.  Performing the ABI on patients before applying compression and on patients with lower extremity ulcers is one of them.  As wound clinicians we use the ABI and our clinical assessment to help guide us into determining what type of ulcer we are dealing with so we can make appropriate referrals and develop the best treatment plan for our patients. It’s a step we can’t afford to leave out; our patient’s limb may depend on it.