Posts Tagged ‘Wound Care’

Wound Care Myths: 5 More Debunked

Friday, November 25th, 2016

Whether it involves heel protectors, anti-embolism stockings, or letting wounds “breathe,” there are still plenty of wound-care myths circulating out there. Ready for the truth? You can handle it.

Wound Care Myths: 5 More Debunked

 

Do you use wet-to-dry dressings in order to save money? Have you administered oral antibiotics to treat infected wounds? And do you follow physicians’ orders for wound treatments even though you know they’re inappropriate?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you are not alone. You are among a host of other professionals who have believed or participated in some of the most common wound care myths. In an earlier post, we revealed why these and other wound care myths simply need to go away. But we’re not finished. Here are five more myths that run counter to the evidence and wound care standards that guide our clinical practice.

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Diabetic Toenails: Top Tips for Proper Trimming

Friday, November 11th, 2016

Check out these best practices for trimming your diabetic patient’s toenails, which can help in preventing foot ulceration.

Diabetic Toenails: Top Tips for Proper Trimming

 

Did you know that a whopping 10-25% percent of all patients with diabetes ultimately develop a foot ulcer – a diagnosis that brings a five-year mortality rate of nearly 50%? Consistent foot care, such as regular screenings, footwear assessment and nail maintenance can help prevent ulceration.

You can help diabetic patients with nail maintenance by taking extra care to preserve the integrity of the toenails. This includes keeping the cuticles and surrounding skin intact, and following best practices when trimming the nails. That’s why we’ve put together our top tips for proper trimming.

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The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

Clearly it is a legal liability when health care professionals (HCPs) do not follow doctor’s orders. But when the patient chooses not to follow doctor’s orders, things are not so clear.

The Blame Game: Is It All Right to Blame the Patient?

 

Most of the lawsuits I deal with have more than one named defendant. For example, the plaintiff (typically a deceased patient’s next of kin) might sue a hospital, a nursing home, and the attending physician at each facility. Sometimes they go a bit further and may even include the administrator, the director of nursing, and individual HCPs, such as the wound care nurse or the registered dietitian nutritionist.

When a lawsuit has multiple defendants, one of the main tasks is determining how much responsibility for the outcome to assign to each party. Responsibility is a nice word for blame, because that is really what we are talking about. Each defendant’s attorney will argue that their client is not to blame, which is obviously their job. What is not so obvious is that this means the attorney must deflect the blame to one of the other parties. It is truly every defendant for himself or herself.

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12 Wound Care Fun Facts

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Beer, honey and grease? The history of wound care includes all three, and much more. Go ahead … amaze your friends and colleagues with these wound care fun facts.

12 Wound Care Fun Facts

 

We’ve come a long way in wound care, especially over the past 100 years or so. But wound care techniques are as old as humankind, with the first wound treatments being described five millennia ago.

And while electronics and advanced technology have made an enormous impact in the way we treat wounds, ancient wound care practices helped pave the way. Take a look at 12 of our favorite wound care fun facts.

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Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Even the best wound care detectives are challenged by this sneaky culprit that delays healing. Here’s how to identify biofilm bacteria and solve the case.

Wound Detective Series: How to Get Away with Killing Biofilm

 

Ready for some serious detective work? In this wound-care case, we will try to find and invade the elusive biofilm bacterial hide-out. So the questions are: where are those microbes holed up, how do I know if they are even there, and how do I get rid of them?

Put on your Wound Detective hat – this one’s going to be tough. Even with your trusty magnifying glass, it’s not easy to spot the signs and symptoms of biofilm in your patients’ wounds.

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Cancer Patient’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Clearing drainage tubes for patients has gotten easier, thanks to a breast cancer patient’s husband and his invention, Tube-Evac.

Cancer Survivor’s Husband Invents Device to Help Others

 

Clearing surgical tubes is a common procedure in wound care, and it often comes as second-nature for clinicians. But it can still be time-consuming and complicated. So imagine how daunting and difficult it is for friends or family members who have never done such a thing, and are responsible for a loved one’s after-surgery care.

Thanks to a loving and very creative husband, there is now a product available that makes the process of clearing tubes easier and faster. It’s called Tube-Evac, and we are happy to share its story.

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Pressure Injuries with Cartilage? Stage Away

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

When it comes to wound care, staging pressure injuries with visible or palpable cartilage doesn’t have to be complicated. Here’s what to do.  

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(Photo: NPUAP copyright & used with permisson)

 

If you’ve ever treated wounds around the ear or in the area just below the bridge of the nose, you know how very little subcutaneous tissue there is. As a result, pressure injuries in these areas tend to be quite shallow, and they typically reveal cartilage.

So when encountering a pressure injury with visible or palpable cartilage, how should you stage it? We’ve got the answer.

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Wound Care and Debridement: Know the BEAMS

Friday, August 26th, 2016

These five major debridement methods for wound clinicians are easy to remember (hint: BEAMS), and key to the wound healing process.

Wound Care and Debridement: Know the BEAMS

When it comes to healing chronic wounds, clinicians are all about Wound Bed Preparation, which is the process of removing local barriers to wound healing. A key to this process is debridement – the removal of necrotic, dead tissues from the wound bed.

In order to provide the best care possible for your patients, it’s important to know the differences between the two main categories and five major methods of debridement.

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Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Check out these top tips to recognize, treat and prevent malnutrition – and get those patient wounds healing.

 

Malnutrition and Wound Care: A Dreadful Duo

 

(Adapted from Tips to Recognize, Treat and Prevent Malnutrition by Amy Carrera, MD, RD, CNSC)

Malnutrition in the hospital setting can be more common than you think. In fact, up to half of hospitalized patients are either malnourished or at-risk of malnutrition. And when it comes to wound care, malnutrition can cause a number of complications, including delayed wound healing, infection, and other problems that may lead to hospital readmissions.

Let’s take a closer look at what malnutrition actually is, what happens when patients are malnourished, and some tips to recognize, prevent and treat it.

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10 Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist and fellow ostomate Laura Cox shares her most frequently asked patient questions (and she gives you the answers, too).

Ten Most Common Ostomy Patient Questions

photo: Sherry Yates Young/Shutterstock.com

Editor’s note: in her blog series, Ostomy Lifestyle Specialist Laura Cox, Shield HeatlhCare, shares lifestyle tips and information with fellow ostomates. After being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at the age of eighteen, Cox underwent ileostomy surgery in 2011. Today, you can find her one-on-one advice, support and insights at her OstomyLife blog, and on other Shield HealthCare social media sites.

 

In my experience working with a variety of healthcare professionals and patients, I continuously field a variety of questions about ostomies, some of which I hear again and again. And I’m always happy to answer them.

For clinicians working with ostomy surgery patients, it’s important to be armed with helpful information that can be shared in order to help them learn to be more comfortable and confident after surgery. That’s why I’ve compiled the ten most common questions that ostomy patients ask – along with my answers from personal experience. By sharing them within your facility, you can help your patients feel more confident as they heal and regain their independence.

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