Posts Tagged ‘Woundcare’

Top Tips for Best Wound Cleansing Practices

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Are your wound cleansing practices up-to-date? Find out with these top tips for cleaning wounds properly and choosing the right cleansers.

Top Tips for Best Wound Cleansing Practices

 

When you get clinicians together to talk about wounds, dressing choices are usually a popular topic. Wound cleansing? Not so much.

Cleaning a wound thoroughly – and frequently – is a crucial part of wound care. In fact, you should clean a wound every time you change a dressing – unless it’s contraindicated. Why is it so important? Cleaning a wound:

  • removes loose debris and planktonic (free-floating) bacteria.
  • provides protection to promote an optimal environment for healing.
  • facilitates wound assessment by optimizing visualization of the wound.

So, how do you know if your wound cleansing practices are up-to-date? It all comes down to choosing the appropriate cleansers and cleaning the wound using the correct wound cleaning technique.

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We’ve Always Done It This Way: Flagyl Crushing & Other Wound Care Bad Habits

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Off-label drug use and questionable documentation are just two wound care bad habits that can get clinicians into trouble. Don’t just accept it because “We’ve Always Done It This Way” .

Wound Care Bad Habits

 

 

As clinicians, we use our knowledge, training and experience to find solutions and take care of patients in the best way possible. We learn about standards of care, scope of practice, and facility policies and procedures to guide our actions and care-giving.

There are several outdated common practices and treatments, however, that continue to surprise us. While there are plenty examples to talk about, let’s cover some of the issues most often brought to our attention.

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Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

How do you use hydrogel dressings to keep wounds moist without causing maceration? Very carefully.  

 

Maceration and Hydrogels? Just Say Whoa

 

If you’ve ever taken a long bath or spent an afternoon in a swimming pool, you’re familiar with what happens to your hands and feet: they become soft, white, and wrinkled up like prunes. This is a classic case of maceration, which occurs when skin tissue is exposed to excessive moisture over a period of time.

As clinicians, we regularly treat patients with wounds (which need to be kept moist) that are surrounded by tissue that needs to be kept dry. So knowing how to properly treat the wound without causing maceration makes all the difference in the healing process.
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Pressure Injuries? (Don’t) Say It Ain’t So!

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Mounting pressure to call pressure injuries (aka pressure ulcers) something else has caused a stir – and clinicians in wound care are feeling the heat. Find out why.

Pressury Injuries - Don't Say It Ain't So

One of the most basic principles of healing a wound is to determine the cause – and then remove it. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But this is easier said than done, as many wounds have similar characteristics, and we don’t always have all the facts at our disposal in order to pinpoint the cause.

Unfortunately, this process has become further – and unnecessarily – complicated, thanks to increasing pressure (no pun intended) on wound clinicians to name a pressure injury something else. See? We told you it was complicated. Here’s what you need to know.

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Wild on Wounds 2015: Exhibitor Spotlight

Friday, June 26th, 2015
Robert Lang

Robert Lange CWCMS, National Accounts Manager

Southwest Technologies, Inc., brings innovative technologies and solutions to the wound care industry

According to Robert Lange, the tagline of Southwest Technologies, Inc. (SWT), isn’t meaningless lip service. Treating the World Well is a statement that drives company philosophy and the actions of its employees.

“We truly want to help caregivers heal patients,” says Lange, National Accounts Manager. “We are always patient-centered, which is why we enjoy being a part of the Wild on Wounds annual conference and sharing our products with such enthusiastic and knowledgeable attendees.”

Lange and other SWT educators will be on-site at the 2015 WOW National Conference in Las Vegas to answer questions, perform hands-on product demonstrations, offer training and product sample give-aways. Located at Booth #434, visitors will have the opportunity to learn about the newest collagen research, and have access to new assessment tools that have been developed to better support practices and make wound care easier.

“As most people in our industry will tell you, evidence-based treatment is in the forefront of wound-care trends,” says Lange. “Caregivers will change the way they approach treatment, and will greater emphasize proven methods over inexpensive solutions in order to gain better results.”

Lange says the SWT products that include Elasto-gel™, Gold Dust®, Stimulen® and NectaCare® will positively support the continuum of care for the patient and care-giver throughout all healthcare settings.  He says the company’s proven technologies backed by evidence-based research make care plans less cumbersome. “Our products are easy to use, help support positive outcomes, and are truly cost-effective,” he says. “They meet the needs of the patient, caregivers and wound characteristics, including types and etiologies.”

Lange, who has been trained and certified as a Wound Care Market Specialist (CWCMS®) by the Wound Care Education Institute®, says the WOW conference is really special. “It’s the perfect combination of high energy and knowledge-based programming.” He says that when attendees truly want to learn and interact with exhibitors, the better the experience is for everyone.

“The open forum allows for attendees to get all their questions answered, and to learn more about specific topics that are so crucial in our industry,” Lange says. This will be SWT’s fifth WOW Conference.

Wild on Wounds is the annual conference dedicated to continuing education for all clinicians interested in healing wounds. Click here for complete details and to register online.

 

Temperature Effects on Wound Healing

Sunday, May 3rd, 2009

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As you may know, the loss of moisture from any surface by evaporation is accompanied by cooling of the surface. Therefore as wound tissues lose moisture a cooling effect occurs in the wound. Cells and enzymes function optimally at normal body temperature. A temperature drop of just 2 degrees C is sufficient enough to affect the biological healing process.

Did you know that when a wound dressing is changed can drop a wound base temp for up to four hours before it returns to normal? Think about that when considering healing times as well as prepping your patient for a dressing change next time.

Another thing to consider is that when tissue cooling occurs it can lead to an increase risk of infection by causing vasoconstriction and increasing hemoglobin’s need for oxygen. This results in decreased oxygen available for neutrophils which fight infection.

So how is Temperature effecting your patient’s wound healing rates? Are you considering this variable when approaching the care you deliver to the patient?

If you have questions or comments, don’t hesitate to comment on this blog.

For more information about Wound Care Credentialing check out the National Alliance of Wound Care