Archive for the ‘Diabetic wound care’ Category

How to pick the best wound care certification to fit your role

Tuesday, April 16th, 2019

wound care certification

If you’re working in wound care and seeking to earn wound care certification, kudos because your skills are in great demand.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

“The wound care industry in general lacks enough knowledgeable clinicians to handle the challenges of chronic wounds, as rarely is comprehensive wound care training included during college training of all disciplines, this includes MDs, NPs, PAs, RNs, PTs, OTs and LVNs,” said Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC, one of our clinical wound care instructors.

The lack of standardized, pervasive wound care training for clinicians, sets the foundation for why clinicians working with wound patients on a routine basis, may want to get certified in wound care, said Richlen, who also owns Infinitus LLC, in Santa Claus, Ind., a wound care instruction and consulting company.

If you’re having difficulty trying to decide which wound care certification to start with, the info below may be just what you’re looking for to help you decide which certification route to go.

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Why our 2019 Wild on Wounds conference will WOW you

Thursday, March 28th, 2019

Wild on Wounds

As a wound care clinician you have a passion for your work. It’s this passion that drives you to learn about the latest evidence-based findings on the most effective treatments and products you can use on your patients.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

At the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI), we offer two strategies to help you achieve clinical excellence in wound care by attending our Wild on Wounds (WOW) national wound conference and taking our wound care classes.

Wild on Wounds (WOW) is an annual conference created for clinicians who practice skin and wound management.

This year’s event is Sept. 11-14 at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel. The curriculum at WOW is designed in a format that’s relevant for all types of clinicians involved in skin and wound management, said Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, co-founder and clinical consultant with WCEI.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re a physical therapist, a nurse, an occupational therapist or a physician, our WOW conference, as well as our WCEI courses, support all types of clinicians at different levels of learning,” Morgan said.

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5 common myths debunked about nutrition for wound healing

Tuesday, March 26th, 2019

nutrition for wound healing

Wound care clinicians work diligently to find the most relevant products while using the latest evidence-based treatments to provide the best patient care.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

For optimum wound healing to occur there is another important factor – a nutritious diet.

Proper nutrition for wound healing includes a diet with the right number of calories, vitamins, minerals and nutrients necessary to maintain skin integrity and promote wound healing.

To learn more about nutrition for wound healing, we spoke with Julie Stefanski, MEd, RDN, CSSD, LDN, CDE, FAND, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and content writer for food, nutrition and dietetics at Relias Healthcare, about five of the most common myths regarding nutrition and wounds.

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How to care for diabetic foot ulcers and other diabetic wounds

Monday, March 4th, 2019

diabetic foot ulcers

Whether you are new to wound care, or a seasoned veteran, you’ll most likely encounter patients with diabetes on a regular basis. And by far, the most common wounds seen in these patients are diabetic foot ulcers, said Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC, clinical instructor for the Wound Care Education Institute.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes has affected more than 31 million people in the U.S. since 2015.

“In addition to diabetic foot ulcers, diabetics can also get venous and pressure ulcers too,” said Richlen who also owns Infinitus LLC in Santa Claus, Ind., a wound care instruction and consulting company. “Having a diagnosis of diabetes can complicate and delay the healing process of any type of wound.”

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Lower Extremity Ulcers and the Toe Brachial Pressure Index

Friday, January 19th, 2018

To treat patients with lower extremity ulcers, you need to find out if there’s impaired arterial blood flow. For some patients, however, the standard Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) yields misleading results. Fortunately, there’s an easy alternative: the Toe Brachial Pressure Index (TBPI).  Here’s when and how to perform this simple test.

 

Lower Extremity Ulcers and the Toe Brachial Pressure Index

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Diabetes: Eight Reasons to Get It Under Control Now!

Friday, January 12th, 2018

Patients with diabetes are more likely to suffer many serious health issues besides foot wounds and amputations. This makes it imperative that they resolve to get their blood glucose levels under control.

Diabetes: 8 Reasons to Get It Under Control Now!

All of the lawsuits I review have a common theme. The plaintiff suffers from a chronic wound and some degree of malnutrition and/or dehydration. I have started to notice that in addition to these problems, the plaintiff also quite often has diabetes. This trifecta of problems leads to pain, suffering, disability, and discontent.

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

People with diabetes are 10 to 20 times more likely to have a lower extremity amputation than those without diabetes.1 This is a scary statistic compounded by the fact that people with diabetes may not even notice a foot wound developing because they cannot feel it because of neuropathy. A foot ulcer is the initial event in more than 85% of major amputations that are performed on people with diabetes.2 Knowing this should provide enough motivation for patients to get their diabetes under control, but some people need even more reasons. Here are eight more consequences you can discuss with your patients. Hopefully, one will hit home.

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Diabetic Toenails: Watch for Change

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Changes in the diabetic foot can happen fast: here are the signs and types clinicians in wound care need to look for.

Diabetic Toenails: Watch for Change

As a wound care professional, chances are you’ve treated a number of nail conditions and abnormalities that occur among the general population. But when you’re working with diabetic patients, noticing and identifying variations is even more crucial. This is because change can happen more rapidly in the diabetic foot, and pathologies in diabetic toenails can ultimately lead to skin breakdown, foot ulcerations and infection. So, what causes the nails to change? What exactly should you look for? We’ve got you covered.

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Diabetic Toenails: Top Tips for Proper Trimming

Friday, November 11th, 2016

Check out these best practices for trimming your diabetic patient’s toenails to help prevent foot ulceration.

Diabetic Toenails: Top Tips for Proper Trimming

 

Did you know that a whopping 10-25% percent of all patients with diabetes ultimately develop a foot ulcer – a diagnosis that brings a five-year mortality rate of nearly 50%? Consistent foot care, such as regular screenings, footwear assessment and nail maintenance can help prevent ulceration.

You can help diabetic patients with nail maintenance by taking extra care to preserve the integrity of the toenails. This includes keeping the cuticles and surrounding skin intact, and following best practices when trimming the nails. That’s why we’ve put together our top tips for proper trimming.

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Diabetic Foot Screening Guide

Friday, July 29th, 2016

Five clinical tests for diagnosing loss of protective sensation in the diabetic foot, plus tips on inflammation assessment.

Diabetic Foot Screening Guide

How serious are diabetic foot ulcers? The statistics are sobering:

  • It is estimated that between 10 and 25% of patients with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer in their lifetime.
  • Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84% of all lower leg amputations.
  • The five-year mortality of patients with newly diagnosed diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is nearly 50%, and carries a worse prognosis than breast cancer, prostate cancer, or Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

In addition, DFUs are at increased risk for infections and other complications, and continue to be a major cause of hospitalizations and additional healthcare expenditures.  So while patients suffer greatly from DFUs, these chronic wounds are also a huge financial burden on healthcare systems. This is because these same patients spend more days in the hospital, and experience more visits to the emergency room and outpatient physician offices than other patients with diabetes.

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Diabetic Footwear: If The Shoe Fits, Wear It

Friday, April 29th, 2016

When it comes to diabetic wound care, footwear matters – and proper diabetic patient shoe assessment is key.

Diabetic Footwear

Wound clinicians know how devastating foot amputations are for diabetic patients. But what you might not know is that a whopping 50% of diabetic foot amputations are a direct result of patients wearing improper footwear. Surprised? Unfortunately, this staggering statistic is accurate. But the good news is that there’s something we can do about it. If we get diabetic patients to wear the proper shoes, we can cut diabetic foot amputations in half.

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