Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

Telewound sessions: Best practices when conducting virtual appointments

Wednesday, June 24th, 2020
Telewound

With the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth and telewound services are in high demand.

For many wound care clinicians, providing telewound services may be a new addition to their practice.

We spoke with two telewound experts to help you learn more about best practices and possible glitches when conducting a telewound session.

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How a wound care app can complement your practice

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020
A doctor uses a wound care app on a tablet at the hospital

More wound care clinicians are using wound care apps when treating their patients.

Some clinicians use them on their own as an adjunct to the requirements of their employers. Others use a specific wound care app because it’s integrated in their employer’s electronic medical record systems.

Use of wound care apps is standard operating procedure and mandated when caring for wound patients.

Whatever category you find yourself in as a wound care clinician, here is a quick overview of three popular wound care apps for clinicians and one for patients.

These will keep you up to date on what’s out there in the world of wound care apps.

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Where to find negative pressure wound therapy photos and videos

Wednesday, October 30th, 2019
Clinicians try a negative pressure wound therapy device at our Wild on Wounds conference.

When treating patients with negative pressure wound therapy systems, the effective use of photographs can play an important part in providing optimum care.

“The reason photos are so integral is there are more wound patients than there are wound care clinicians,” said Beth Hawkins-Bradley, MN, RN, CWN, principal clinical educator in medical affairs at Cardinal Health in Dublin, Ohio. “For many patients, the reality is they may have a nurse assigned to manage their wound via a negative pressure wound therapy system who is not a wound care expert.”

One example of how resources can be valuable for negative pressure wound therapy system users is V.A.C. Therapy.

It’s a multi-step process that can be hard to describe in words, but is much simpler to visually demonstrate with photos, said Ron Silverman, MD, FACS, chief medical officer at KCI, an Acelity Company based in San Antonio.

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Buzz Report recaps wound care news from past year

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2019
Clinicians sitting on the subway read the latest about wound care news.

The wildly popular Buzz Report is one of the main attractions of our annual Wild On Wounds (WOW) conference.

Wound care clinicians from across the U.S. look forward to attending our Buzz Report session each year to learn the latest about wound care news, research and products that came out.

The Buzz Report is the brainchild of Donna Sardina, MHA, RN, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS, co-founder of WCEI and the WOW conference.

Sardina said she created the first Buzz Report in 2004 as an overview for clinicians, in response to WCEI student requests on how to stay current on the latest developments in the world of wound care news.

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FIRST things first when evaluating wound healing research

Thursday, July 18th, 2019
wound healing research

You hear more and more about evidence-based wound care. But what does that mean and how can you tell when a study is a good one?

To evaluate the reliability of wound healing research, you can use the acronym FIRST to help. Here’s what each step means.

F — Funding

Who funded the study? Was the data published for the financial gain of a company?

You should compare these studies to other existing data to determine whether the results are true or manipulated. Studies funded by a manufacturer, or those in which the researchers and authors have a financial relationship with the manufacturer, tend to be biased.

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Advances in wound care technology lead to bioprinting and more

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

bioprinting

Printing human skin to heal large wounds might sound like something straight out of science fiction, but patients suffering from chronic wounds and pressure ulcers soon might have access to this treatment.

wound care

By Heather Cygan, BA

Scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina have created the first mobile skin bioprinting system, which will allow bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound.

“The unique aspect of this technology is the mobility of the system and the ability to provide on-site management of extensive wounds by scanning and measuring them in order to deposit the cells directly where they are needed to create skin,” Sean Murphy, PhD, a WFIRM assistant professor, said in a news release.

Murphy was the lead author of a paper published earlier this year in Nature’s Scientific Reports journal.

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Advanced VAC Therapy: When is the Right Time to Step Up Your Game?

Monday, November 20th, 2017

Kimberly Hall, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, CW­CN-AP

When V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy has made a difference in my clinical practice

Advanced VAC Therapy

 

Kimberly Hall

Kimberly Hall, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, CWCN-AP

For some of us, V.A.C.® Therapy has been a mainstay for decades. But even as some of the most experienced clinicians, we know that sometimes we just need something else–something—more? What do we do when patients who have been on V.A.CTherapy for a week and that granulation tissue isn’t quite as beefy red as we would have expected or hoped for? Or maybe the wound that seems to have stalled and just won’t budge even though you’ve seen V.A.C.® Therapy heal a similar wound in the same amount or less time? How about the wound that you’re using V.A.C Therapy on but every time you do a dressing change, that layer of wet yellow slough in the base of the wound keeps returning like a bad habit, despite using all the tricks up your sleeve for additional chemical and mechanical debridement? Then what?

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Always, Never, When? My approach to V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Susan Mendez-Eastman RN, CWCN, CPSN

Should you consider using negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell (NPWTi-d) on every wound ALWAYS? An experienced wound nurse discusses some contraindications.

 

ALWAYS, NEVER, When? My approach to V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy - NPWTi-d

 

Susan Menendez-Eastman, RN, CWCN, CPSN

Susan Menendez-Eastman, RN, CWCN, CPSN

I am a huge proponent of V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy, but I would NEVER endorse that you should ALWAYS use V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy to treat a wound.  There are only a handful of situations where I would NEVER consider use of the therapy.  Wound care is dynamic and should be considered a continuum where patients and wounds are kinetic – the status, and therefore the needs, change. Goals of care also change, so to say any wound care treatment or therapy should ALWAYS or NEVER be used would be closed minded and fail to address the variability of wound care and healing.

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The Next Generation of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy – V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

Elizabeth McElroy, RN, MSN, CRNP, CWS, CWOCN

Why and when to consider using something more than traditional negative pressure wound therapy.

The Next Generation of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

 

iPhone® just celebrated its tenth year and is on its 7th generation of phone.  Just like any other technology, wound care dressings continue to evolve to meet the clinician and patient needs.  V.A.C.® Dressings have continued to grow and adapt.

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Say Cheese to the Camera: Wound Photography Shot by Family Members

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

These days, most people have a camera in their pocket, giving family members the ability to take their own wound photographs.

Say Cheese to the Camera: Wound Photography Shot by Family Members

 

When we talk about wound photography, we usually are referring to health care professionals (HCPs) taking periodic photographs to document the healing process as part of a patient’s permanent medical record. In fact, some new cameras are made specifically for this purpose. Some of these cameras not only capture an image but also can provide wound measurements, and some even offer automated integration into the patient’s electronic health record.

Today, however, HCPs are not the only ones with cameras. Family members or visitors to a wound clinic or health care facility usually have a camera with them, and they love to use it. This has raised new questions in wound care because many of these unofficial photographs become introduced as evidence in lawsuits.

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