Archive for the ‘Wound care education’ Category

Wound temperature can affect the wound healing process

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020
wound temperature

A patient’s core body temperature must be above 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit and below 107.6 for wound healing to occur.

The loss of moisture from any surface by evaporation is accompanied by cooling of the surface. So, as wound tissues lose moisture, a cooling effect occurs resulting in lower wound temperature.

Even a decrease of only 2 degrees Celsius is sufficient enough to affect the biological healing process of your patients. This is because cells and enzymes function optimally only at normal body temperature.

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Wild on Wounds (WOW) is going virtual this year. Here’s what you can expect

Thursday, August 20th, 2020
Wild on Wounds (WOW)

The world has drastically changed with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

One alteration to our daily lives is the practice of avoiding crowds in an effort to slow down the spread and decrease risk of exposure to coronavirus.

So, for everyone’s health and well-being, we’ve moved our popular Wild on Wounds Conference (WOW) to a virtual format this year.

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Reduce pressure injuries when prone positioning COVID-19 patients with ARDS

Thursday, July 9th, 2020
Prone positioning

As the COVID-19 pandemic endures, there is an increased awareness of the practice of placing patients in prone positioning versus supine positioning.

Prone positioning is important when patients are experiencing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is a risk for those who have the virus.

Prone therapy is not new, however.

“Critical-care nurses have known for many years that prone positioning patients with ARDS results in lower mortality rates and less incidence of lung injury,” said Kathleen M. Vollman, MSN, RN, CCNS, FCCM, FCNS, FAAN, clinical nurse specialist and consultant at Advancing Nursing, LLC.

Prone therapy was a nursing intervention first used personally by Vollman on an ARDS patient in 1981.

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Malignant wounds: How to identify and treat them

Wednesday, May 20th, 2020
malignant wounds

Some wound care clinicians have experience caring for patients with malignant wounds.

But you may not be familiar with them at all. We recently spoke with a malignant wounds expert to learn more about them.

That expert is Joni Brinker, MSN/MHA, RN, WCC, an Ohio-based consultant and clinical nurse educator with Optum Hospice Pharmacy Services of Eden Prairie, Minn.

She is a returning speaker for our 2020 virtual Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference in September. She offered the following explanation.

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How to differentiate stasis dermatitis from cellulitis

Wednesday, May 6th, 2020
stasis dermatitis

In my experience, I have encountered the confusion between venous dermatitis and cellulitis that plagues the wound care industry. 

The unlikely diagnosis of “bilateral cellulitis” is not uncommon in wound care, followed by two weeks of unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

Despite some similarities, there are many differentiating characteristics that diagnosing clinicians either overlook or misunderstand. 

In an effort to help clinicians more accurately differentiate the two conditions, we will discuss the differences in this blog post. It will help you prescribe appropriate treatments and improve patient outcomes.

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How to teach patients to manage wound care at home during COVID-19

Monday, April 20th, 2020
wound care at home

Some wound care centers are closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

More patients are opting to perform their own wound care at home because they are concerned about venturing out and risking exposure to the virus.

We spoke with three wound care professionals to learn more about care provided in the home and teaching patients and families to care for wounds until life returns to normal. 

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Meet wound care nurse and WCEI instructor Anita Prinz

Wednesday, March 11th, 2020
wound care nurse

A 10-year veteran of the fashion industry and Wall Street, Anita Prinz, MSN, RN, CWOCN, decided she needed a career change.

Attracted to the nursing profession, Prinz went to nursing school after working in other fields. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing in 1995 at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland, Calif.

Soon thereafter, she moved to New York City and worked as a visiting nurse in Manhattan while engaging in a unique mode of travel to visit her patients. “I rode my bicycle to see patients in the late 1990s,” she said.

After seeing numerous wounds in her home care patients and working with exceptional wound care nurses, Prinz said she felt called to learn more about wound care. So she pursued certification as a wound, ostomy and continence nurse.

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Your essential guide to wound packing dead space

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020
wound packing

Let’s face it, there is nothing fun, exciting or sexy about this topic.

Wound packing is just a necessary part of performing good wound care treatments in the event your patient has notable depth in their wound. 

However, there is a purpose and a proper way to pack a wound with the goal of promoting healing in the most effective and efficient manner.

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Explore our new financing option to take WCEI courses today

Wednesday, January 29th, 2020
A man applies for financing on his computer.

If your goal is to become wound care certified, we can help.

At the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI), we’re now offering flexible, low-cost financing to take your course.

The new financing option is provided in partnership with Affirm, Inc.

For learners who qualify, a special offer of 0% interest for 12 months is in effect for those who apply for the student loan on or before Feb. 29, 2020, said Janene Brubaker, senior product manager with Relias, the parent company of the WCEI.

This new loan program is an alternative to credit cards and personal loans, and you will know within minutes if you have received approval.

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Traumatic open wounds: Let’s define the types

Wednesday, December 25th, 2019
A girl has a Bandaid on her knee covering an open wound.

Learn the difference between the types of open wounds caused by trauma.

Open wound types include abrasions, excoriation, skin tears, avulsions, lacerations and punctures, according to our Skin and Wound Management course workbook.

Traumatic open wounds involve a disruption in the integrity of the skin and underlying tissues caused by mechanical forces. In other words, these wounds are caused by brief but forceful contact with another object or surface.

Differentiating the types of traumatic open wounds involves noting the shape and depth, as well as the nature of the mechanical force that caused it.

Below, we outline six acute, traumatic open wounds that are commonly confused.

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