Archive for the ‘Wound Care Education Institute’ Category

What happens when orders don’t meet wound care standards

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019
standards of wound care

Does your ordering clinician’s wound care knowledge rest on outdated education and assumptions?

A wound care certified physician says his peers often ignore the scientific evidence on effective treatments that form wound care standards.

This is problematic because success in wound care requires understanding basic principles and evidence.

With this in mind, we developed our multi-disciplinary course in Skin and Wound Management to build the ranks of competent, certified specialists.

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Colostomy irrigation: Learn how at WOW

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019
colostomy irrigation

Wild on Wounds speaker Anita Prinz, RN, MSN, CWOCN, will share pointers this month at our national conference on colostomy irrigation as a life-changing ostomy management alternative to pouching.

One of the most important and rewarding aspects of working with ostomy patients is helping them adapt to life with a stoma.

A supportive and caring healthcare provider can make all the difference, educating patients on the best ostomy management practices for their schedule and lifestyle.

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Don’t be a wound dabbler: Proper wound care must be science based

Monday, August 19th, 2019

proper wound care

Ever wonder where clinicians come up with some of the treatments we unfortunately see in wound care today?

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

Does it leave you scratching your head or pulling out your hair? I am sure there are plenty of wound care examples we could discuss for hours (with plenty of laughs).

Yet that doesn’t solve the problem or change the hearts and minds of clinicians — or wound dabblers — who feel those treatments are proper wound care.

Here’s a look at a few “inappropriate” treatments I have come across in my years as a wound specialist.

Let’s dissect them to understand what the “rationale” may have been and discuss why common sense, logic and scientific evidence doesn’t support them as proper wound care.

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Skin and wound management course helps you prep smart

Monday, August 12th, 2019

skin and wound management course

“We should remember that good fortune often happens when opportunity meets with preparation.” – Thomas Edison

wound expert

Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS

As the inventor of the phonograph, the motion-picture camera and, of course, the electric light bulb, Edison took on plenty of challenges in his time.

For healthcare clinicians of today, one of the biggest challenges is chronic wounds, which include diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous, arterial leg ulcers. An estimated 67 million people are suffering with chronic wounds across the globe.

According to our co-founder Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, “as of last count, 6.5 million chronic wounds are being treated in the U.S., at a cost of $11 billion — not to mention the pain and suffering for patients.”

The reason, said Morgan, is patients are living longer with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

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Nurse expert witness impacts pressure injury case

Monday, August 5th, 2019

nurse expert witness

Many of you have provided expert testimony in lawsuits in your own state, or other states, concerning wound care and whether that care was consistent with the applicable standard of care and standards of practice in that situation.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

The following Arizona case — Rasor and Donald Miller, Wife and Husband, v. Northwest Hospital LLC — determined if a wound care nurse expert could testify to the cause of a wound sustained by the plaintiff (patient).

The female patient had open-heart surgery at the hospital and received an intra-aortic balloon pump “threatened through her femoral artery.” This required immobilization of her leg.

The patient was in the ICU for several days and the nursing staff discovered a pressure injury on her coccyx that reached stage IV and required 31 debridement procedures.

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Instructor takes wound care education across South Pacific

Monday, July 29th, 2019

wound care education

When Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, began her career in wound care, she never imagined her work would someday take her to American Samoa.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

In June 2019, it did just that. Morgan, who co-founded the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI), spent three days consulting with Samoan clinicians on specific wound patients and presented a one-day formal wound care class.

At the same time, she enjoyed a life-changing experience by connecting with her newly discovered people, culture and nation.

Adopted at the tender age of five days old, Morgan grew up an only child. Even though her adoptive parents were wonderful and Morgan said she felt blessed, as time went on she yearned to learn who her biological parents were.

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Learn how written discharge instructions can protect your practice

Tuesday, July 16th, 2019

discharge instructions

Accurate, complete and defensive documentation is essential in all areas of practice, and wound care nursing is no exception.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

One component of documentation that is of utmost importance is written discharge instructions. In the following case, this was one of the central issues the federal court had to evaluate — Shelton v. United States, 804 F. Supp. 1147.

The patient sought treatment at a VA hospital after he was bitten on the tip of the middle finger of his right hand during an altercation with a female after they left a bar.

The wound was painful and bleeding.  He called 911, stating he had been shot. He would not allow the paramedics to examine his finger.

The ED admitting nurse noted on the admission form he had suffered “trauma” to his right middle finger. He was then seen by an ED physician, whom he told he was bitten and that he had been shot.

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How to persuade clinicians to change a wound care order

Tuesday, July 9th, 2019

wound care order

How can you convince an ordering clinician to consider a more effective wound treatment? Psychology offers some clues.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

If you’re a knowledgeable, certified wound care clinician, receiving an outdated or illogical wound care order can be frustrating.

So, what can you do when you’re tasked with administering treatments you believe will be ineffective or harmful to a patient?

First, practicing substandard wound care can land you in legal hot water, even if you are following orders.

To protect your license, reputation and financial well-being, you need to speak up about wound care orders that contradict your knowledge and training.

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Instructor named 2019 WOC Nurse of the Year for ostomy care

Tuesday, June 25th, 2019

ostomy care

On June 23, alumni of the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) cheered to see a dedicated clinician, teacher and nursing entrepreneur receive recognition for her commitment to ostomy care and education.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

The United Ostomy Association of America named WCEI Clinical Instructor Joy Hooper, RN, BSN, CWOCN, OMS, WCC, its WOC Nurse of the Year.

The prestigious award shines a spotlight on the many ways Hooper has touched lives with her commitment to teaching ostomy care.

“My father has always taught us the importance of helping people, and one of the most important people to help is the one you’re not expecting a thank you from or expecting anybody to know about,” Hooper said. “That is someone who you want to help. You won’t see this immediate reward, but you will be rewarded. UOAA and helping people have always been close to my heart.”

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How to decide if you should earn wound care certification

Thursday, June 20th, 2019

wound care certification

Have you ever wondered if getting wound care certification is necessary? The answer is not always that simple.

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

You need to first ask why you want to be certified.

Among the many valid reasons for seeking certification is the increase in your credibility with colleagues and patients. Certification also can provide career advancement opportunities in the wound care industry while ensuring better quality care for patients.

But does it always ensure quality care? Not necessarily.

Over the years, I have encountered clinicians with wound care certification practicing outdated, non-evidence based wound care treatments. That may seem outlandish, and you may be asking yourself, “How can that happen? Shouldn’t they know better?”

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