Archive for the ‘Wound care’ Category

Your state nurse practice act can dictate wound care liability

Wednesday, June 17th, 2020
state nurse practice act

I received a question about an RN who was practicing in a “wound center.” 

She received notice from her state board of nursing that a complaint had been filed concerning her treatment of a patient’s wound. 

According to the RN, a substitute physician saw her patient one week. He told the patient and a family member that Tegaderm should not have been used on the wound.

In addition, the substitute physician said there were two wounds — not one — and the second had not been treated.

The RN stressed the following:

  • There was only one wound
  • The substitute doctor was incorrect
  • The patient’s regular physician had been seeing the patient for some time and knew there was only one wound
  • She was upset about the complaint
  • Had to hire an attorney to represent her before the board
  • She believes the physician defamed her and should pay her attorney fees
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We’ve Always Done It This Way: Flagyl Crushing & Other Wound Care Bad Habits

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Off-label drug use and questionable documentation are just two wound care bad habits that can get clinicians into trouble. Don’t just accept it because “We’ve Always Done It This Way” .

Wound Care Bad Habits

 

 

As clinicians, we use our knowledge, training and experience to find solutions and take care of patients in the best way possible. We learn about standards of care, scope of practice, and facility policies and procedures to guide our actions and care-giving.

There are several outdated common practices and treatments, however, that continue to surprise us. While there are plenty examples to talk about, let’s cover some of the issues most often brought to our attention.

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Shingles: Treatment and Managing Pain

Friday, May 26th, 2017

Clinicians can help relieve patient pain and discomfort caused by shingles with these treatment options.

Shingles: Treatment and Managing Pain

Did you know that one in three people in the United States is affected by shingles? This common and very painful skin condition also happens to be made worse by stress – like hospitalization and other chronic illnesses. As clinicians, we are in the position to help reduce patient pain and discomfort as best we can. There is no cure, but there are a variety of treatments that can help.

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Wound Care and Epibole: It’s All About the Edge

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

How do you spot an unhealthy wound edge? Learn more about the causes, prevention and treatment of epibole.

Wound Care and Epibole: It’s All About the Edge

When it comes to treating epibole, it’s all about knowing what a healthy wound edge looks like – and being able to spot signs of trouble. This basic overview includes epibole causes, prevention and treatment. We’ll have you ready to meet this condition head-on and get your patients on their way to recovery.

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Wound Care Challenge: Skin Folds and ITD

Friday, March 31st, 2017

How to identify and treat intertriginous dermatitis (ITD) within the skin folds among obese patients.

Skin Folds and ITD

Statistics show that more than one in three adults in the U.S. are obese (BMI>30). Patients within this population often have skin folds in many areas of the body, especially under the arms, in the groin, under the breasts, and beneath the panniculus – an overhanging “apron” of skin and fatty tissue in the lower abdomen. As a result, this population is more likely to experience a common inflammatory condition called intertriginous dermatitis (ITD) – also known as intertrigo.  But what exactly causes ITD, and what are the best ways to treat it?

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What’s New in Wound Care? Meet Our Fantastic Four

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Check out these four new and cutting-edge wound treatments that’ll have you excited and ready for the future.

What’s New in Wound Care? Meet Our Fantastic Four

When it comes to wound care, there are some incredible developments in progress that might just blow your mind. In fact, these new products and wound treatments are so cutting-edge, they sound like they’re straight out of science a fiction movie or super hero comic book. What are they and why are we so excited?

Meet the Fantastic Four

Clinicians know that healing chronic wounds is especially challenging due to a variety of barriers and patient co-morbidities. Fortunately, advanced treatments and technologies facilitate the care of these wounds and promote healing. These advancements are having a positive impact in terms of shortened healing times and reduced hospital stays.

Ready for some impressive examples? Let’s take a look at four fantastic new wound treatments that are either in the experimental or trial phase, and will hopefully be a part of our wound-care future.

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Home Care Nurse’s Passion Leads to Drainage Bulb Holder Invention

Friday, January 27th, 2017

Drainage bulbs can be frustrating for patients and caregivers. But they don’t have to be, thanks to an innovative R.N., her mother and a sewing machine.

Home Care Nurse’s Passion Leads to Drainage Bulb Holder Invention

 

As a wound care professional, you’ve probably had at least some experience with patients who need drains as part of the post-procedure healing process. But what you might not be familiar with are the feelings of angst and frustration that often plague patients and caregivers when they are faced with managing the drains successfully. Thanks to a determined nurse and some creative problem-solving, we now have solutions.

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12 Wound Care Fun Facts

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Beer, honey and grease? The history of wound care includes all three, and much more. Go ahead … amaze your friends and colleagues with these wound care fun facts.

12 Wound Care Fun Facts

 

We’ve come a long way in wound care, especially over the past 100 years or so. But wound care techniques are as old as humankind, with the first wound treatments being described five millennia ago.

And while electronics and advanced technology have made an enormous impact in the way we treat wounds, ancient wound care practices helped pave the way. Take a look at 12 of our favorite wound care fun facts.

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I’m going to conference! Are you?

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Donna_headshotBy: Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS

Years ago, when I first started out in the wound care specialty, the only way to learn about new products and what was going on in the field was to “go to conference” (wound care conference). All year long, planning and excitement continued to build for our big trip. Not going wasn’t an option; our facility, patients, and administrators needed us to attend. If we didn’t, we’d be way behind our competition in regard to cutting-edge, hot-off-the-press wound care treatments and techniques.

Besides being a forum for displaying new wound care products, conference is an opportunity to network, to see what others are doing—what’s working and what isn’t— and to hear firsthand from researchers.

Living in the digital age has changed things for us. We’re blessed to have innovative information at our fingertips whenever we connect to the Web via computer, smartphone, or tablet. Manufacturers’ websites, government guidelines, and social media sites can keep us informed of what’s hot and happening if we just take the time to check them.

But as glorious as the Web is, I still believe in the power of attending conference. Some things are just meant to be seen, touched, and experienced—live and in person. Being in a convention hall with hundreds or even thousands of clinicians who love the same icky, yucky, stinky, and sometimes-nauseating challenge of wound management is something you just can’t experience on the Web. The power of passion, excitement, and inspiration from others is so contagious.

It’s understandable that money and time constraints play a big part in decisions to attend conference. Nonetheless, I believe all wound and ostomy experts should figure out a way to go to conference every year, or at least every other year. Here are some creative ideas for funding your conference expenses:

Educational grants from suppliers
State or local educational grants
Employer’s tuition-reimbursement program
Combining your annual family vacation with the conference trip
Holiday or birthday gift from your family
Simple negotiation with your employer.

Currently in the United States, we can choose from several wound conferences, including the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy cosponsored event Wild on Wounds (WOW). I encourage all wound and ostomy experts to support and advance our specialty by continually educating and updating ourselves—and one way to do this is to go to conference.

Donna Sardina, RN, MHA, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS
Clinical instructor
Wound Care Education Institute
Plainfield, Illinois

DISCLAIMER: All clinical recommendations are intended to assist with determining the appropriate wound therapy for the patient. Responsibility for final decisions and actions related to care of specific patients shall remain the obligation of the institution, its staff, and the patients’ attending physicians. Nothing in this information shall be deemed to constitute the providing of medical care or the diagnosis of any medical condition. Individuals should contact their healthcare providers for medical-related information.

One Day Wound Seminars Continue To Excite Clinicians

Monday, October 28th, 2013

2013-03-27 23.07.05Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI®) is busy wrapping up another national tour of the one-day wound seminar. Instructors Nancy Morgan and Jennifer Oakley spent the year touring the US and instructing thousands of clinicians with an interest in wound care. “We have met so many passionate clinicians that wanted to enhance their knowledge in wound care to make a difference in their patients’ lives! These seminars give folks a good foundation for beginning their knowledge along with providing a good review for clinicians already certified in wound care” said Nancy Morgan, co-founder of WCEI.

The seminars focus on wound assessment and on the advanced wound dressing categories and review the who, what, where, when, why and how including:

• The elements of a wound assessment
• Identifying pressure ulcers utilizing 2007 NPUAP Staging Guidelines
• Identifying tissue types commonly found in wounds
• Documenting comprehensive wound assessment
• and more!

November and December offer a few additional opportunities to attend at locations listed below. For complete details go to:  www.wcei.net/one-day

  • November 12 – Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • November 14 – Glenview, IL
  • December 4 – Ft Wayne, IN
  • December 5 – Ft Wayne, IN
  • 2014 Schedule Coming Soon!

Bring a seminar to your facility!

WCEI also offers the opportunity for a facility to bring the seminar to their location, allowing customization to the individual needs.  For more information on hosting a seminar at your facility, go to: www.wcei.net/Host_A_One_Day_Seminar

[One Day Seminar Instructors: Nancy Morgan RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS and co-founder of WCEI.  Jennifer Oakley RN, BSN, CWCA, WCC, DWC, OMS]