Posts Tagged ‘comprimised grafts’

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)

Monday, May 4th, 2009

hbotAs an adjunctive therapy, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is one that holds a lot of promise. The therapy consists of a person entering a chamber, either a monoplace (one person) or multiplace chamber (many people) and breathing nearly 100% oxygen at a pressure greater than sea level for a prescribed amount of time. A patient is typically “at pressure” for ninety (90) minutes. The patient is usually in the chamber for a total of about two (2) hours, since it takes approximately 9-16 minutes to get ‘down’ to therapeutic pressure and the same amount of time to ‘come back up’ to sea level pressure.

The goal of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is to increase the amount of pressure and dissolved oxygen that is delivered to the body tissues. The pressure lends assistance to significantly increase tissue oxygenation in hypoperfused, or infected wounds.

HBOT is typically indicated for compromised wounds that are Diabetic Wagner Grade III, Acute Arterial Insufficiency, Gas Gangrene, Osteomyelitis (Failed convention wound therapy and s/p antibiotic therapy), compromised flaps and grafts, and osteoradionecrosis or effects of radiation. Here are some interesting case studies.

For more information about wound care and WCEI’s Wound Care Certification course click here