Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Adjunctive modalities apply when wound care basics aren’t enough

Wednesday, December 11th, 2019
Clinicians discuss adjunctive modalities to treat a wound.

Have you ever felt like you may have run out of options to heal a wound?

We have all been there in our wound care careers. Before you throw in the towel or pull your hair out in frustration, take a step back and make sure you started the process in the correct manner.

First, ensure you have successfully addressed all the basics of wound healing:

  • Removed the cause
  • Provided moist wound healing
  • Removed the necrotic tissue and epibole
  • Managed the bioburden
  • Ensured adequate tissue perfusion
  • Ensured adequate nutrition

Then review treatments that can accelerate the healing process. You have to build your treatment plan on a solid foundation of basic approaches before considering more expensive, adjunctive modalities. 

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Buzz Report recaps wound care news from past year

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2019
Clinicians sitting on the subway read the latest about wound care news.

The wildly popular Buzz Report is one of the main attractions of our annual Wild On Wounds (WOW) conference.

Wound care clinicians from across the U.S. look forward to attending our Buzz Report session each year to learn the latest about wound care news, research and products that came out.

The Buzz Report is the brainchild of Donna Sardina, MHA, RN, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS, co-founder of WCEI and the WOW conference.

Sardina said she created the first Buzz Report in 2004 as an overview for clinicians, in response to WCEI student requests on how to stay current on the latest developments in the world of wound care news.

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Expert advice on complete decongestive therapy for lymphedema

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2019
lymphedema

When healthcare professionals treat patients afflicted with lymphedema, some believe not much can be done to provide relief from swollen limbs and pain.

But much can be done to redirect lymph that’s collecting in the wrong place and send it back to the lymphatic system where it belongs, said Denise Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC, CLT, director of program development and area manager in Southwest Indiana for Paragon Rehabilitation in Louisville, Ky.

Millions of patients in the U.S. suffer with lymphedema, Richlen said.

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PT embraces passion for wound care teaching

Tuesday, September 24th, 2019
wound care teaching

For some people, teaching is in their blood and is a big part of who they are.

Scott Batie, MPT, RPT, MEd, WCC, a clinical instructor with our Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) for 14 years, is one of those people.

He has been involved in the teaching profession for much of his life.

During college, Batie was a wrestler. After receiving his undergraduate degree, he taught high school English while coaching a high school wrestling team.

Batie realized he loved teaching and caring for others but wanted a change of pace and profession. After some thought and consideration, he decided to pursue a degree in physical therapy.

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What happens when orders don’t meet wound care standards

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019
standards of wound care

Does your ordering clinician’s wound care knowledge rest on outdated education and assumptions?

A wound care certified physician says his peers often ignore the scientific evidence on effective treatments that form wound care standards.

This is problematic because success in wound care requires understanding basic principles and evidence.

With this in mind, we developed our multi-disciplinary course in Skin and Wound Management to build the ranks of competent, certified specialists.

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Learn tips for proper colostomy irrigation

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019
colostomy irrigation

Wild on Wounds speaker Anita Prinz, RN, MSN, CWOCN, shared pointers in September at our national conference on colostomy irrigation as a life-changing ostomy management alternative to pouching.

One of the most important and rewarding aspects of working with ostomy patients is helping them adapt to life with a stoma.

A supportive and caring healthcare provider can make all the difference, educating patients on the best ostomy management practices for their schedule and lifestyle.

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Don’t be a wound dabbler: Proper wound care must be science based

Monday, August 19th, 2019

proper wound care

Ever wonder where clinicians come up with some of the treatments we unfortunately see in wound care today?

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

Does it leave you scratching your head or pulling out your hair? I am sure there are plenty of wound care examples we could discuss for hours (with plenty of laughs).

Yet that doesn’t solve the problem or change the hearts and minds of clinicians — or wound dabblers — who feel those treatments are proper wound care.

Here’s a look at a few “inappropriate” treatments I have come across in my years as a wound specialist.

Let’s dissect them to understand what the “rationale” may have been and discuss why common sense, logic and scientific evidence doesn’t support them as proper wound care.

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Skin and wound management course helps you prep smart

Monday, August 12th, 2019

skin and wound management course

“We should remember that good fortune often happens when opportunity meets with preparation.” – Thomas Edison

wound expert

Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS

As the inventor of the phonograph, the motion-picture camera and, of course, the electric light bulb, Edison took on plenty of challenges in his time.

For healthcare clinicians of today, one of the biggest challenges is chronic wounds, which include diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous, arterial leg ulcers. An estimated 67 million people are suffering with chronic wounds across the globe.

According to our co-founder Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, “as of last count, 6.5 million chronic wounds are being treated in the U.S., at a cost of $11 billion — not to mention the pain and suffering for patients.”

The reason, said Morgan, is patients are living longer with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

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Instructor takes wound care education across South Pacific

Monday, July 29th, 2019

wound care education

When Nancy Morgan, MBA, BSN, RN, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, began her career in wound care, she never imagined her work would someday take her to American Samoa.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

In June 2019, it did just that. Morgan, who co-founded the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI), spent three days consulting with Samoan clinicians on specific wound patients and presented a one-day formal wound care class.

At the same time, she enjoyed a life-changing experience by connecting with her newly discovered people, culture and nation.

Adopted at the tender age of five days old, Morgan grew up an only child. Even though her adoptive parents were wonderful and Morgan said she felt blessed, as time went on she yearned to learn who her biological parents were.

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FIRST things first when evaluating wound healing research

Thursday, July 18th, 2019

You hear more and more about evidence-based wound care. But what does that mean and how can you tell when a study is a good one?

wound care

By Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC

To evaluate the reliability of wound healing research, you can use the acronym FIRST to help. Here’s what each step means.

F — Funding

Who funded the study? Was the data published for the financial gain of a company?

You should compare these studies to other existing data to determine whether the results are true or manipulated. Studies funded by a manufacturer, or those in which the researchers and authors have a financial relationship with the manufacturer, tend to be biased.

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