Making an Impact: Successful Wound Care Poster Presentations

If you’re interested in submitting a poster presentation for the Wild on Wounds (WOW) conference, you’ll want to highlight your research findings succinctly through a combination of text and visuals.

“Poster presentations are a great way for clinicians to showcase their hard work on a project,” suggested Diana Ramirez-Ripp, HMCC, CWCMS, manager of live events for WCEI. “The content of the poster should interest your audience and provide a clear take-home message that attendees can grasp in a few moments.”

At the upcoming WOW conference, you’ll have the opportunity to share your research and accomplishments with other wound care professionals through poster abstracts. Posters are a standard at many conferences, and at WOW they include inspiring and thought-provoking presentations in various areas of wound care. These presentations give attendees the opportunity to gain new evidence-based knowledge in practice.

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Wild on Wounds (WOW) Is Back and Better Than Ever

Over the last two years, wound care clinicians have been among the many brave, dedicated souls out there providing the best care possible for their patients — in the face of seemingly endless adversity. It’s impossible to overstate the magnitude of what you’ve all been through.

These are among the many reasons the Wound Care Education Institute staff is so excited about this year’s Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference. The mere notion of meeting face to face after so long apart is truly a reason to celebrate.

For those unaware, Wild on Wounds is an annual conference with workshops and curriculum designed to be relevant for wound care clinicians practicing at every level of skin and wound management. It’s an opportunity to learn, network, discover what’s new in wound care, and of course, have a great time.

In partnership with the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy (NAWCO), this year’s event is being held September 7-10 in sunny Hollywood, Florida. Buying your ticket by April 30 saves you $100, so register early. There are seven tiers of entry to choose from, so take a look at the site to see everything we’re offering this year.

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Make Wound Care Nursing Your Next Career Milestone

As many wound care nurses would tell you, a career in wound care nursing can be extremely rewarding if you have a passion for the work and can create a trusting relationship with patients.

Wound care nurses’ responsibilities go much deeper than just dressing wounds — although dressing a wound properly using the right materials and regimen is a crucial part of the wound treatment process. These specialists also know how to assess, debride, and clean wounds, and are an integral part of a patient’s care team.

Whether patients have chronic or acute wounds, wound care nurses can decide on treatment plans that promote healing and prevent infection. And patients profit from having these compassionate, highly skilled professionals by their sides.

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 All About the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Injury Risk

As we shifted from “turning Q 2 hours” for positioning our patients to “individualized positioning based on tissue tolerance,” many clinicians were unsure how best to establish a plan of care.

How do we determine the positioning frequency? What is the pressure injury risk for our patients? How can we quantify risk to drive plan of care for positioning?

The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer/Sore Risk is a great tool to assist with those questions.

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Treating Pediatric Burns Takes Skills and Sensitivity

Knowledgeable wound care clinicians are needed not only for adults but for the pediatric population too. Burns are common injuries incurred by children. We spoke with two experts to learn more about this important area of wound care for pediatric burns.

Stats on Pediatric Burns

“Burns are a leading cause of death and disability for children worldwide,” said Tina Palmieri MD, FACS, FCCM, Assistant Chief of Burns at Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California and Burn Division Chief at the University of California, Davis.

In the U.S., the stats are staggering. “Nearly each week in 2018 in the U.S. alone, approximately six children aged 0-19 died, 139 were hospitalized, and 1,762 were taken to the emergency room due to fire and burn injuries,” said Palmieri.

According to the American Burn Association Fact Sheet, 24% of all burn injuries occur in children under the age of 15, said Jenna Leach MSN, RN, WCC, plastic surgery specialty nurse at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware.

Palmieri pointed out risk factors for pediatric fire and burn deaths are: Read the rest of this entry »

How Do You Treat a Malignant Wound? Let’s Look at the Options

Wounds can present in patients as a result of various etiologies. One cause of wounds not typically on most clinicians’ radars are wounds that result from primary tumors.

We spoke with Joni Brinker, MSN/MHA, RN, WCC, an Ohio-based consultant and clinical nurse educator with Optum Hospice Pharmacy Services of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and speaker for WCEI’s Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference, to gain insight on malignant wounds that can develop from primary tumors.

What Is a Malignant Wound?

“A malignant wound is a manifestation of malignant (cancerous) cells that have infiltrated through the skin,” said Brinker.

Other structures such as blood and lymphatic vessels also can be invaded by malignant cells and produce wounds, she said.

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The Best Wound Care Certification to Have — Comparing Options

If you’re currently working in wound care or contemplating moving into it as your new specialty, you may want to consider becoming certified.

Why? The skills of certified wound care clinicians are in great demand.

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WCEI to Become Relias Wound Care — New Name. Same Mission

As you know, specializing in wound care is all about staying current to ensure you’re practicing the absolute latest standards of care — you are dedicated to constantly improving patient outcomes.

You are tireless in your work, your daily sacrifices, and all you do to provide the best possible wound care to your patients.

At WCEI, we share your commitment. We have always made decisions with this in mind — doing everything we can to share the latest best practices with wound care specialists and make sure we’re delivering you the most current information for your practice. This is why we first partnered with Relias, our parent company, in 2018. We saw the opportunity to reach even more people.

And with Relias, we’ve been able to do just that. Over the past several years, we’ve touched more healthcare organizations, more clinicians, more bedside practitioners to improve wound and ostomy care, heal more patients, and mitigate risk.

This is why we couldn’t be more excited to tell you that what you currently know as the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) will become Relias Wound Care in 2022!

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Pediatric Patients Require Special Wound Care

Pediatric patients with chronic and acute wounds need caregivers who are well-versed in wounds and in young patients’ unique needs. We spoke with three pediatric wound care experts to learn more about the most common wounds seen in kids, their etiologies, treatments, and recommendations for making dressing changes less traumatic.

 Acute Wounds Seen in Pediatric Patients

Pediatric patients can need treatment for a wide range of wounds. In fact, the list is quite extensive, according to experts.

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Maximizing At-Home Wound Care for Patients

Having worked in the home health industry for almost 10 years, I learned a lot about how to maximize my impact with wound care patients. I’ve also learned how to help the home health agency become financially efficient and still have good wound healing outcomes.

My goal is to share some general insights on how different therapies are an important part of at-home wound care plans for patients in the home health setting, as well as offer some suggestions on how to manage wound care in the most cost-efficient way.

Keep in mind that each state practice act may be different. In general, physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) can provide similar services in the treatment of wounds. However, they also bring unique differences.

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