Archive for the ‘Wound Care Research’ Category

Wound Healing Research: The Need for Grants Is Widespread

Wednesday, October 7th, 2020
wound healing research

If you’re a wound care clinician, you’re well-aware more research is needed on wound care and wound healing.

Locating evidence-based findings on wound healing from literature can be a difficult undertaking.

There is a great need for more research and evidence regarding wound healing not only because of its scarcity, but also because of the pervasiveness and cost of chronic wounds.

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Ileal Conduit Care and Nurses: A Review of Evidence-Based Practice

Thursday, July 16th, 2020
ileal conduit

In 2019, researchers in China released an important study on interventions with ileal conduit patients after having undergone surgery for bladder cancer.

It has since proven to be a wonderful resource for all providers who work with ileal conduit patients.

The study began in 2014 with the establishment of a “dedicated team” of ostomy specialists who provided standardized postoperative care.

Its purpose was to undercover the effects of a more involved, systematized program of postoperative care for patients with ileal conduits who were discharged from the hospital.

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Study: Pressure Injuries at ICU Admission Predict Outcomes

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020
A senior patient holds a nurses' hand in the ICU.

Pressure injuries are a pervasive problem.

They present a real cost for patients physically, psychologically and monetarily. Plus, pressure injuries have an annual financial burden estimated at $11 billion per year in the U.S., especially in the ICU.

A study published in June 2019 by the journal Critical Care Nurse reports pressure injuries present at ICU admission are associated with longer hospital stays. They also have a modest association with higher in-hospital mortality rates.

“I was looking for an unambiguous clinical marker that could predict patient outcomes and mortality in ICU patients,” said William T. McGee, MD, MHA, associate professor of medicine and surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

He said different modeling tools try to predict outcomes and mortality in ICU patients, but they are not used routinely for all patients at all hospitals.

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Some hospital-acquired pressure injuries are unavoidable, says study

Tuesday, November 5th, 2019
A clinician measures a patient's hospital-acquired pressure injuries on his backside.

Pressure injuries are the bane of wound care clinicians and other healthcare professionals who work diligently to provide the best patient care.

When patients develop hospital-acquired pressure injuries, financial penalties are placed on the organization by the federal government.

And high rates of hospital-acquired pressure injuries are perceived as a negative indicator on the quality of nursing care — the more hospital-acquired pressure injuries, the lower the quality of care is the consensus.

However, a new study revealed that sometimes even if everything is done right for a patient, a pressure injury can still form, and especially in critical care patients, said Joyce Pittman, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FNP-BC, CWOCN, FAAN, a nurse practitioner and coordinator in the wound/ostomy department at Indiana University Health Academic Health Center in Indianapolis, and associate professor at the University of South Alabama in Mobile.

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Study: Wound Care Certified Nurses Reduce Pressure Injury Rates

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2019

pressure injury

Just how much of an impact do wound care certified (WCC) nurses and other clinicians have on their patients? More than you might imagine.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

A formal study was conducted under the auspices of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) program known as the Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HIIN). The findings of the study revealed a correlation with the presence of onsite WCC staff and a reduction in pressure injury rates for patients.

More than 2.5 million people in the U.S. are affected by pressure injuries, and more than 60,000 patients die each year as a direct result of the condition, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

The HIIN study was funded by a grant program through the CMS using civil monetary penalty funds. These funds are used to support projects that benefit patients and residents of nursing homes with the goal of improving the quality of care they receive.

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FIRST Things First When Evaluating Wound Healing Research

Thursday, July 18th, 2019
wound healing research

You hear more and more about evidence-based wound care. But what does that mean and how can you tell when a study is a good one?

To evaluate the reliability of wound healing research, you can use the acronym FIRST to help. Here’s what each step means.

F — Funding

Who funded the study? Was the data published for the financial gain of a company?

You should compare these studies to other existing data to determine whether the results are true or manipulated. Studies funded by a manufacturer, or those in which the researchers and authors have a financial relationship with the manufacturer, tend to be biased.

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WCEI Instructor Finds His Niche in Physical Therapy Wound Care

Thursday, June 13th, 2019

physical therapy wound care

Many alumni of the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) will tell you they enjoyed their training — so much so they view the WCEI staff and fellow students as another type of family.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

Part of what gives the institute that warm, welcoming feeling is the dedication to students and energetic style of teaching of one of its instructors: Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC.

He is a clinical instructor with the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) and owner of Santa Claus, Ind.-based Infinitus LLC — a wound care instruction and consulting company.

Richlen began his extensive career as a licensed physical therapist 25 years ago and, almost simultaneously, found his work in physical therapy also involved caring for patients with a wide variety of wounds. He first discovered his attraction to wound care while still in his clinical practicum in physical therapy school.

“I did a six-week internship at a VA hospital,” Richlen said. “My first wound care patient was a paraplegic veteran with a stage 4 pressure injury. This was my first exposure to this type of wound. I had to help with his treatment in the whirlpool, submerging much of his entire body for his sacral wound. I soon realized they did not teach us how to care for wounds in PT school.”

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Case Studies Confirm Effectiveness of Honey for Wound Care

Thursday, March 21st, 2019

hone for wound care

When durable medical equipment Manuka honey isn’t available to treat a chronic wound, can over-the-counter (OTC) honey products serve as an effective substitute? Poster presenters from the 2018 Wild On Wounds national conference looked for evidence in two case studies.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Despite rapid developments in new wound care technology, clinicians are turning to an ancient approach to speed healing and control bioburden: honey.

As early as 3,000 BC, Egyptians and other civilizations relied on honey as a topical wound treatment. With the discovery of antibiotics, however, honey quickly fell out of favor.

As antibiotic resistance drives the search for alternatives today, therapeutic honey enjoys renewed attention from researchers.

Is Manuka honey the only effective option?

Most of the studies on medicinal honey focus on durable medical equipment products, which typically contain honey extracted from the nectar of a Manuka tree.

Based on the evidence, medical-grade Manuka honey has gained esteem among wound care professionals for its increased antimicrobial action compared to other types of honey. Studies also suggest medical-grade Manuka honey contains compounds that jump-start stalled wounds, reduce odor and accelerate healing.

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Medicare Spending on Wound Care: The First Comprehensive Study

Friday, October 13th, 2017

Chronic wounds impact 15% of Medicare beneficiaries at an estimated annual cost of $28 billion to $32 billion, making nutrition a seemingly cost-effective purchase.

Medicare Spending on Wound Care: The First Comprehensive Study

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

Did you ever wonder how much it really costs to treat and heal various wounds? Patients, family members, and healthcare team members often complain to me that $5/day for nutrition therapy is “too expensive.” Cost is relative, because according to the first comprehensive study of Medicare spending on wound care, it appears that an investment in medical nutrition therapy is a wise investment indeed.

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