Wound Care Minute: How to Measure Depth of a Wound Covered by Slough or Eschar

February 17th, 2017

In this 90-second video, WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan answers a common measurement question: how do you measure wound depth when there’s slough or eschar in the way?

 

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Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

February 10th, 2017

What should wound care professionals do when a physician orders wet-to-dry dressings? Be prepared and know the facts.

Wet-to-Dry Dressings: Why Not?

 

Those of us in wound care know that wet-to-dry dressing are considered substandard care. Some physicians, however, commonly order wet-to-dry dressings for patients, often leaving clinicians in a tricky situation. Do you feel conflicted as to how you should respond? It can be intimidating, but with a little preparation, it doesn’t have to be. By knowing the facts about wet-to-dry dressings, as well as effective and cost-efficient alternatives, you can handle such situations with confidence. Not sure where to start? We’re here to help.

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When Your Patient Refuses to Be Turned and Repositioned—And Then Sues!

February 3rd, 2017

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

The battle between optimal medical care and patient rights is one to fight with empathy and finesse to keep it out of the courtroom.

When Your Patient Refuses to Be Turned and Repositioned—And Then Sues!

 

I recently reviewed a lawsuit filed by the family of a patient* with a spinal cord injury. The patient was involved in a car accident and sustained multiple traumatic injuries. The medical team worked tirelessly over the course of many weeks to stabilize him. Because of this catastrophic accident, the patient was understandably quite devastated and depressed. He refused all physical therapy and spent most days lying in bed on his back, despite encouragement from his medical team and pleading from his family. He frequently stated that he wished he was dead and that he wanted everyone to leave him alone, often escalating things to the point of screaming.

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Home Care Nurse’s Passion Leads to Drainage Bulb Holder Invention

January 27th, 2017

Drainage bulbs can be frustrating for patients and caregivers. But they don’t have to be, thanks to an innovative R.N., her mother and a sewing machine.

Home Care Nurse’s Passion Leads to Drainage Bulb Holder Invention

 

As a wound care professional, you’ve probably had at least some experience with patients who need drains as part of the post-procedure healing process. But what you might not be familiar with are the feelings of angst and frustration that often plague patients and caregivers when they are faced with managing the drains successfully. Thanks to a determined nurse and some creative problem-solving, we now have solutions.

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Wound Detective Series: Is It (Or Is It Not) Infected?

January 13th, 2017

How can you tell if a wound is really infected? Learn how to spot the clues and be a skilled wound investigator.

Is it infected?

 

Are you ready, wound detectives, to tackle a new case? This time, we’re learning how to spot the clues that reveal infection. Remember, the wound will tell us what we need to know, we just have to pay careful attention and know what to look for. After all, treatment depends primarily on our clinical assessment (and then a wound culture, if indicated). Sharpen up those investigative skills, and let’s get to work.

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Stomas: What You Need to Know

January 6th, 2017

There are two main types of stomas, and they both have certain “ideal” characteristics in common. Do you know what they are?

Stomas: What You Need to Know

 

You say potato, I say potahto. You say ostomy, I say … stoma. Huh? Those of us in wound care know that it’s not uncommon to hear the terms ostomy and stoma used interchangeably, even though they have different meanings.

In the WCEI blog, “Let’s Talk Ostomy Types,” we described the types and sub-types of bowel and bladder ostomy surgeries. Now, we’re focusing on an aspect of ostomies that wound care professionals experience directly in practice: the stoma.
 
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Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

December 30th, 2016

Did you miss any WCEI blogs?  Never fear, we wrap up the year with the topics that were most read, shared, and commented upon.

Your Favorite WCEI Blogs of 2016

In 2016, we covered a lot of ground, bringing you straight talk on range of wound care topics, including ostomy care, diabetic wounds, legal issues, assessment tips, and more. Which were readers’ top five favorites? Here’s the run-down.

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Wound Care Minute: What’s the Difference Between Excoriation and Denuded Skin?

December 24th, 2016

Excoriation vs. Denuded: WCEI co-founder Nancy Morgan discusses these often-confused wound care terms

 

 

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The RATS of Malpractice: Don’t Let Them Invade Your Wound Care Practice!

December 16th, 2016

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

The new year is quickly approaching, and most of us are reflecting and setting goals for 2017. Here’s a simple plan that outlines what you must do to minimize the risks of practice.

The RATS of Malpractice in Wound Care

 

As wound care practitioners, our main goal is to heal wounds as quickly and painlessly as possible. Over the years, this simple mission has gotten tied up in countless legal matters as disappointed patients and their families turn to attorneys when things don’t work out. Follow this outline of what to do to minimize the risks of practice in the new year.

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Ankle-Brachial Index? It’s Easier Than You Think

December 7th, 2016

Determining a patient’s ABI is a vital part of wound care, but unfortunately this step is often avoided … or even omitted. Here’s why this happens, and how you can change it.

Ankle-Brachial Index? It’s Easier Than You Think
Have you ever faced a seemingly daunting task, and so you do everything in your power to avoid it? Like renewing a driver’s license, for example. Or maybe cleaning out the refrigerator. But then once it’s done, you look back and say, “Hey, that wasn’t so bad!”

That’s kind of how it is when it comes to determining a patient’s ankle-brachial index (ABI). While this is a key component of the lower-extremity vascular exam, it’s often overlooked – and even omitted – just because it seems so overwhelming. Hang in there, folks: we’re here to help make it easier.

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