Case studies confirm effectiveness of honey for wound care

March 21st, 2019

hone for wound care

When durable medical equipment Manuka honey isn’t available to treat a chronic wound, can over-the-counter (OTC) honey products serve as an effective substitute? Poster presenters from the 2018 Wild On Wounds national conference looked for evidence in two case studies.

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Despite rapid developments in new wound care technology, clinicians are turning to an ancient approach to speed healing and control bioburden: honey.

As early as 3,000 BC, Egyptians and other civilizations relied on honey as a topical wound treatment. With the discovery of antibiotics, however, honey quickly fell out of favor.

As antibiotic resistance drives the search for alternatives today, therapeutic honey enjoys renewed attention from researchers.

Is Manuka honey the only effective option?

Most of the studies on medicinal honey focus on durable medical equipment products, which typically contain honey extracted from the nectar of a Manuka tree.

Based on the evidence, medical-grade Manuka honey has gained esteem among wound care professionals for its increased antimicrobial action compared to other types of honey. Studies also suggest medical-grade Manuka honey contains compounds that jump-start stalled wounds, reduce odor and accelerate healing.

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What do I need to know about professional liability insurance for nurses?

March 19th, 2019

professional liability insurance for nurses

One of our members submitted a question about what type of professional liability insurance for nurses she should purchase, especially since she is now certified in wound care.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

Questions about professional liability insurance are constantly raised by nurses in all areas of nursing practice.

Wound care nurses are no exception, and this topic was briefly covered in on our blog titled Wound Consulting Business: How to Get Started.

There is a great deal of important information for you to know as a wound care nurse before selecting a professional liability policy.

Before discussing that information, it is important to emphasize that as a practicing wound care nurse, you need to purchase your own professional liability insurance policy.

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How to earn wound care certification and why you should

March 12th, 2019

wound care certification

Whether you’re new to wound care or have worked in the specialty for many years, clinicians who frequently encounter and treat wounds may ask themselves if earning a wound care certification is worth the time and effort.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs. MSN, RN, PHN

Will wound care certification expand your knowledge and skills while enhancing professional growth and providing more career opportunities?

One wound care professional who is happy she decided to take the plunge and become certified is Barbara Petersen, RN, WCC, DWC, OMS, nursing coordination specialist in wound care at Adventist Health Central Valley Network in Hanford, Calif.

Petersen has been a nurse for 35 years, the past 11 of which have been in wound care. Prior to changing specialties, she worked 15 years in the ED, then five additional years as an ED/med-surg/SNF director simultaneously — reporting to two CNOs, and all while still working shifts in the ED. Read the rest of this entry »

Wound care specialist has legal concerns when asked about clinical issues ‘on the fly’

March 6th, 2019

wound care specialist

A reader who is the wound care specialist at her facility submitted a question about being approached by wound care clinicians regarding patient care issues when she is in the hallway, at lunch or is leaving the facility for the day.

wound care

By Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN

She wonders how to handle these situations since she knows her “duty” as a wound care specialist starts when clinicians seek a consultation.

She is right to be concerned about evaluating a patient’s wound care at times when she cannot focus on the case.

In a 2013 study analyzing five years of medical malpractice cases, 7,149 out of 23,000 medical claims and lawsuits involved communication failures. Inpatient settings accounted for 44% of the cases, and 9% of the cases involved nurses/nursing. Read the rest of this entry »

How to care for diabetic foot ulcers and other diabetic wounds

March 4th, 2019

diabetic foot ulcers

Whether you are new to wound care, or a seasoned veteran, you’ll most likely encounter patients with diabetes on a regular basis. And by far, the most common wounds seen in these patients are diabetic foot ulcers, said Bill Richlen, PT, WCC, DWC, clinical instructor for the Wound Care Education Institute.

Carole Jakucs

By Carole Jakucs, MSN, RN, PHN

According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes has affected more than 31 million people in the U.S. since 2015.

“In addition to diabetic foot ulcers, diabetics can also get venous and pressure ulcers too,” said Richlen who also owns Infinitus LLC in Santa Claus, Ind., a wound care instruction and consulting company. “Having a diagnosis of diabetes can complicate and delay the healing process of any type of wound.”

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Where There is Smoke, a Lawsuit is Possible

November 7th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Smoking is known to hinder wound healing, yet most wound care practitioners fail to document any smoking cessation discussion or education.

 

 

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

The daughter of Mrs. Bradley* was barely able to contain herself while giving her deposition. She was sobbing from a place deep in her heart as she retold the story of how her mother lost her leg. Her mother started limping, and they realized she had an “opening” in the skin on the bottom of her foot. Despite treatment, the wound grew in size and became infected. It soon became apparent that she was facing an amputation.

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Sacral Wounds and Diarrhea Don’t Mix, Part 2

October 15th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Frequent bouts of diarrhea make it difficult to care for wounds on the sacrum or coccyx, and healing often is impeded because of fecal contamination.

 

 

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Sacral Wounds and Diarrhea Don’t Mix, Part 1

September 12th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Frequent bouts of diarrhea make it difficult to care for wounds on the sacrum or coccyx, and healing often is impeded because of fecal contamination.

 

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What Would You Do if Your Patient Chokes?

August 8th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Every minute counts when a patient chokes, so you must react confidently and have a plan in place to handle this emergency situation.

 

 

 

 

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

John Quiñones stars in the ABC television show What Would You . The program features actors cast in scenes of conflict or illegal activity in public settings, while hidden cameras record the situation. The focus of the show is to see whether ordinary people intervene or just pass by and how they react. For example, a recent episode featured a young girl’s nanny berating her in public and calling her stupid. Several passersby asked the nanny to cool it, while others just squirmed and silently hurried by. The point of the show is that we never really know how we will react to a situation until we are actually in it, and then each of us has to make a choice.

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Help! My Wound Patient Is a Vegetarian

July 12th, 2018

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

Patients with wounds require increased amounts of dietary protein, typically meaning meats, poultry, dairy products, and eggs. Vegetarians will need alternate sources of protein and amino acids to meet their needs and heal their wounds.

 

Dr Nancy Collins

Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, NWCC, FAND

 

If you have ever heard me talk about nutrition interventions for wound healing, you surely heard me emphasize the patients’ need for protein. In order to build new tissue to heal a wound, patients must consume enough protein each and every day to meet their increased needs. Typically, this means eating increased amounts of meat, poultry, fish/seafood, eggs, and dairy products. This seems simple enough, but what if you have a vegetarian patient?

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