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“I Love Wound Care” Video Contest Winner!

June 28th, 2016

I Love Wound Care Video Contest

We are excited to announce the winner of the 2016 “I Love Wound Care” video contest:

★ Gina Turbeville, RN of Pamplico, SC ★

As our winner, Gina will have the opportunity to take the WCEI online Skin and Wound Management course and join our family of 29K+ passionate healers throughout the United States.

When notified about her winning video, Gina responded, “I am so excited about wound care and want to be educated so that I can make a difference, especially to geriatric patients! Can’t wait to begin my education so that I can be the best I can be!”
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Let’s Talk Ostomy Types

June 16th, 2016

(Adapted from About Ostomies: Ostomy 101 by Shield Healthcare)

A comprehensive guide to the different types of ostomies, including colostomies, ileostomies, and urostomies.

Ostomy Types

Do you know your ostomy types? There are three kinds of bowel or bladder ostomies, and with this handy guide, you can brush up on each one – including the multiple sub-types. But first, let’s cover the basics.

Ostomy Surgery

Ostomy surgery is a surgical operation that redirects body wastes through a new outside opening, called a stoma. The stoma is a new exit point created to divert feces or urine. In some cases, multiple stomas are created to divert both. The term “ostomy” is used interchangeably by patients to refer to their medical condition, their stoma, and/or the appliance used to collect waste.

Intestinal ostomies are most often performed in conjunction with: tumor removal; to permit repair of bowel injuries; congenital defects; or as a last resort, treatment in medically unmanageable cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. Indications for urinary diversion include: tumor removal; congenital or nerve defects; or injuries that take away voluntary bladder control.

Types of Ostomies

There are three types of bowel or bladder ostomies, along with multiple sub-types:

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Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

June 13th, 2016

If you’re in the wound care industry, here’s what you need to know in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury – also known as MARSI.

Oh Mercy, We Have MARSI!

 

Here’s a quiz for all of you in wound care: how many medical adhesive injuries are reported each year in the United States? The answer is 1.5 million. That’s a lot of skin tears and other painful dermal injuries that might have been prevented.

The good news is that, with continued education, we can all play a part in decreasing tape-related wounds in order to avoid Medical Adhesive Related Skin Injury (MARSI). This new descriptor in skin injury is definitely something you need to know.

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WCC Nurses Part of History-Making Conjoined Twin Separation

June 9th, 2016

Two WCC nurses reflect on the historic procedure that successfully separated 10-month-old conjoined twins, Ximena and Scarlett Hernandez-Torres.

WCC Nurses Part of History-Making Conjoined Twin Separation

 

When nurses Roxana Reyna and Kirby Wilson went to work on April 12, 2016, it was anything but an ordinary day. In fact, before entering the doors of the Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, they already knew it would be nothing short of historic.

The two joined a team of surgeons, nurses, and other medical professionals with one goal in mind: to separate 10-month-old conjoined twins, Ximena and Scarlett Hernandez-Torres. It was the regional hospital’s first such operation, and a rare occurrence by any standard, as the incidence of a triplet birth involving conjoined twins is believed to be about 1 in 50 million.

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Using Your Smartphone at Work: A Smart Idea or Not?

June 3rd, 2016

by Nancy Collins, PhD, RDN, LD, FAPWCA, FAND

In health care, personal smartphone use at work is a complicated issue with legal implications.

Smartphones at Work

 

The plaintiff attorney drummed his fingers on the table while he stared at nurse Stephanie Holland* for what seemed like an eternity. He was waiting for her to respond to a seemingly simple question during her deposition—“Do you ever use your personal phone at work?”

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Not Yo’ Grandma’s Stockings

May 27th, 2016

By Christopher Miles, OT, CLT, CWCA, medi USA

Compression garments aren’t what they used to be – and those of us in wound care couldn’t be happier.                                      Not Yo' Grandma's Stockings

Unfortunately, when patients think of compression garments they think of socks that are too tight and difficult to get on, or tend to roll and pinch. What they might not be thinking is that compression therapy is practically the only medical treatment likely to reduce the rate of recurrence of their nasty, painful and smelly venous leg ulcers.

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Maggots and Wound Care: The Not-So-Odd Couple

May 23rd, 2016

The use of maggots in wound care is making a comeback – in the form of maggot debridement therapy – and wound clinicians can’t wait to talk about it.

Maggots and Wound Care

 

Most people don’t get too excited about maggots. In fact, the mere mention of legless larvae surely triggers gag responses and/or skin crawling in millions of non-healthcare citizens everywhere. But that’s definitely not the case for those of us in wound care.

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Telemedicine, Wound Care and . . . Dracula?

May 6th, 2016

Find out how telemedicine continues to change wound care (and what you can learn from your favorite cartoon characters).

Telemedicine, Wound Care and ... Dracula

 

What do Dracula, Wile E. Coyote and telemedicine have in common? It’s an intriguing question for sure, and you’ll be able to find out the answer at the Wild on Wounds (WOW) National Conference, to be held Aug. 31 – Sept. 3 in Las Vegas.

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Diabetic Footwear: If The Shoe Fits, Wear It

April 29th, 2016

When it comes to diabetic wound care, footwear matters – and proper diabetic patient shoe assessment is key.

Diabetic Footwear

 

Wound clinicians know how devastating foot amputations are for diabetic patients. But what you might not know is that a whopping 50% of diabetic foot amputations are a direct result of patients wearing improper footwear. Surprised? Unfortunately, this staggering statistic is accurate. But the good news is that there’s something we can do about it. If we get diabetic patients to wear the proper shoes, we can cut diabetic foot amputations in half.

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Pressure Injuries? (Don’t) Say It Ain’t So!

April 19th, 2016

Mounting pressure to call pressure injuries (aka pressure ulcers) something else has caused a stir – and clinicians in wound care are feeling the heat. Find out why.

Pressury Injuries - Don't Say It Ain't So

One of the most basic principles of healing a wound is to determine the cause – and then remove it. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But this is easier said than done, as many wounds have similar characteristics, and we don’t always have all the facts at our disposal in order to pinpoint the cause.

Unfortunately, this process has become further – and unnecessarily – complicated, thanks to increasing pressure (no pun intended) on wound clinicians to name a pressure injury something else. See? We told you it was complicated. Here’s what you need to know.

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