Archive for the ‘Diabetic Wound Certification’ Category

WOW in Las Vegas: 2015 Highlights

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

What happened at the Wild On Wounds Conference? We’ve got your event highlights right here.

WOW_recapIf you traveled to Las Vegas for the Wild On Wounds (WOW) conference Sept. 2-5, then you know the truth: Skin is In. That was the theme for this record-attendance event. Wound care clinical professionals came together in one place for an exciting, information-packed four days that left us all invigorated and ready to treat more wounds.

Nurses, therapists, physicians, students and industry professionals traveled from all over the country to attend this premier wound care convention. We laughed, we learned … we united over our mutual love of skin!

A popular session was Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Nutrition But Didn’t Ask, led by Dr. Nancy Collins. We learned about the important role of nutrition in wound care – and chronic non-healing wounds that can be a result of malnourishment. We were so pleased to hear such positive feedback about this session. Here are some comments from attendees:

“Two things that stood out: Arginine & Glutamine. Not even our dietician has mentioned these in their orders. Good to know that they are essential in healing a chronic wound.”

“Now I understand why increased caloric intake for overweight patients is important in the wound healing process, and I can now share this information to my co-workers, specifically to our CNAs and nurses alike.”

“Dr. Collins was on-point and presented the information in a very creative way. She also illustrated the importance, economical impact, and quality-of-life that medical nutrition has on the patient. Case study presentations were excellent! Very interactive session. It was a wakeup call for all facilities.”

And while it’s impossible to mention all the other educational sessions, demonstrations and presentations that took place, here are more of this year’s highlights:

  • Record attendance – 1100 nurses, therapists, physicians, students and industry professionals
  • Attendees who influence wound care decisions throughout the care continuum
  • 200+ exhibiting partners
  • Interactive, hands-on sessions for Sharp Debridement, Maggot Debridement
  • Fascinating clinical posters and more!

We should also mention the exciting and successful hands-on Topical Wound Management session led by Nancy Morgan RN, BSN, MBA, WOC, WCC, DWC, OMS, C0-Founder of WCEI.  This session focused on topical wound dressing categories and reviewed specific treatment recommendations, giving attendees the opportunity for one-on-one product demos.  This session will be part of the 2016 WCEI one-day seminar tour. Stay tuned for dates and locations.

“This was a great session divided in two parts: lecture and hands-on. Pacing was great, not rushed, and speaker made sure the audience grasped the important points of the topic, giving real-life examples from her bedside clinical experience which solidified information she wanted to impart.”

 “I have enjoyed every session at WOW, but the round-robin table set-up was superb!! Loved it.”

 

What Did You Think?

How was Wild On Wounds for you? We’d love to know what you liked the most about your experience at WOW. What were your favorite moments of the conference? And what types of sessions would you like to see on the agenda for next year? Please leave your ideas and reflections below.

 

Wild On Wounds Exhibitor Showcase Vendor Spotlight

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

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MPM Medical Inc. brings to you industry experts for 2 days during the WOW conference in Las Vegas on September 2-5, 2015. They will answer your questions, perform product demonstrations and provide hands on product training.  All of their sales representatives have been trained and certified as Wound Care Market Specialists (CWCMS®) by the Wound Care Education Institute®.  They offer a comprehensive line of hydrogels with lidocaine, foam dressings, moisture barriers, antifungals, calcium alginates, waterproof composite dressings, woundgard bordered gauze pad dressings, multilayer composite dressings, cleansers, saturated gauze pads and collagen and super absorbent dressings.

MPM has published a number of practical reference pieces including a definitive Wound Management Guide, Wound Care Wall Charts and clinical studies.  For information on these educational pieces visit their website at: www.mpmmedicalinc.com

Register for WOW today and stop by the MPM booth #224

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What Will You Gain by Attending WOW?  You Will…

  • Discover what is new in wound care which is essential to your practice
  • Elevate your clinical skills with interactive, advanced, how-to sessions and hands-on workshops
  • Participate in product training with industry experts to advance your knowledge of wound care technologies
  • AND MORE…

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc.
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

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Wild On Wounds Conference Early Registration Savings

Friday, April 17th, 2015

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When you register early, you save $100 and you will have first choice in selecting all conference sessions. The early discount rate expires May 1, 2015.  Register today!

Industry and clinical experts will provide training, product demonstrations and will help answer your “hard to heal” wound questions.

Join us in Las Vegas, September 2-5, 2015 and network with hundreds of passionate wound care clinicians with the same goal in mind, to advance their wound care knowledge.

About WOW

Wild On Wounds is a national conference dedicated to clinicians who want to enhance their knowledge and learn current standards of care in skin and wound care. Attend lecture sessions, participate in hands-on workshops and learn all the new products and technologies from industry experts.

Full Conference Registration Includes:

  • Access to educational sessions over 3.5 days
  • Access to product experts during the exhibitor showcase
  • Lunch on each registered day
  • Poolside get-together with a robust buffet
  • FREE cyber cafe to check emails, complete onsite evaluations, etc
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • And more!

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WOUND CARE CERTIFICATION – This Wound Care Certified (WCC®) course offers an evidence-based approach to wound management and current standards of practice to keep clinicians legally defensible at bedside.

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DIABETIC WOUND CERTIFICATION – This Diabetic Wound Certified (DWC®) course takes you through the science of the disease process, focuses on limb salvage and prevention, and covers the unique needs of a diabetic patient.

WCEI2015_OMS_BUTTON_revOSTOMY CERTIFICATION – This Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) course will take you through the anatomy and physiology of the systems involved in fecal/urinary diversions. The course includes hands-on workshops and online pre-course modules.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DETAILS

 

Tips for Trimming Those Diabetic Toenails

Monday, December 8th, 2014

Make sure you have the proper tools. A set of toenail nippers, nail file, and orange stick are typically used.  Always follow your facility or healthcare’s settings policy for nail clip blog imagesinfection control. Single use disposable equipment is favorable.
Nails are easiest to trim after they have soaked for 10 minutes in a footbath to soften them. It is important to remember and educate our patients that the soaking of a diabetic patients feet should only be done by a healthcare professional. You can save some time by cleaning under the patient’s toenails with an orange stick wiping on a clean washcloth in between each toe while the feet are soaking.
After soaking and washing of the feet are completed, dry the patient’s feet completely. Wash your hands and put on new gloves to trim the toenails. Use your dominant hand to hold the nipper. Start with the small toe and work your way medial toward the great toe. Squeeze the nipper to make small nips to cut along the curve of the toenail. Be careful not to cut the skin. Use your index finger to block any flying nail fragments. Nippers are used like a pair of scissors – make small cuts, never cut the nail in one clip all the way across the nail. Never use two hands on the nipper. The nail is trimmed in small clips in a systematic manner. The nail should be cut level with the tips of the toes, never cut so short or to break the seal between the nail and the nail bed. The shape of the nail should be cut straight across and an emery board should be used to slightly round the edges. When filing nails always use long strokes in one direction, avoid using a back and forth sawing motion.
When all toes have been trimmed and filed, remove gloves and wash hands. Apply clean gloves and apply lotion to the top of the foot and to the bottom of the feet, rubbing lotion in well, wipe excess lotion off with a towel. Put patients socks and shoes back on as needed. Wash your hands again and smile, you are done!

FREE WEBINAR:  Skin and Nail Changes in the Diabetic Foot.  Click Here and use coupon code: NAILS through 12/31/15.

 

 

Diabetic Foot Ulcer Assessment and Hands On Lab

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014
Donna Sardina RN, MHA, WCC, DWC, OMS

Donna Sardina RN, MHA, WCC, DWC, OMS

Do you know the components of a Diabetic Foot Exam? It is so important that all of us in wound care know the steps to preventing foot ulcers on our diabetic patients.  And that starts with a routinely scheduled comprehensive foot exam.

Donna Sardina took us through all the aspects of a comprehensive exam during the pre-conference session “Diabetic Foot Assessment.”

The key word here is comprehensive. A proper exam involves much more than just a test of sensation using a Semmes Weinstein monofilament or a tuning fork. What about skin color, texture, temperature, foot deformities, nail deformities, glucose control, and critically important perfusion status. Did you know that it is estimated that 50% of amputations in diabetics are a direct result of improper footwear? That statement gets my attention every time I hear it.

In this session we learned how to examine our patient’s footwear for signs of trouble. Included in the handouts was a document “Diabetes: Shoe Fitting Tips” that will be extremely helpful when putting our knowledge into practice. In recognition of the fact that we are not all specialists in the diabetic foot, Donna shared a “Simplified Sixty Second Foot Screen” published by Dr. Sibbald in 2012. It is a validated tool that has just 10 items on it that can be completed in less than 60 seconds. This seminar was empowering to all who attended and gave us the tools we need to make a difference in this at risk population.

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2014 Annual Wild On Wounds, (“WOW”) National Conference Sets Record Attendance

Friday, September 26th, 2014

For Immediate Release – PRN Newswire:

2014 Annual Wild on Wounds, (“WOW”) National Conference

Sets Record Attendance

Plainfield IL – September 29, 2014 The Wound Care Education Institute® (WCEI) successfully completed its largest “Wild on Wounds” (WOW) conference in Las Vegas, NV. WOW is fast becoming the largest fall wound care conference in the United States drawing close to 1,000 clinicians, students and industry professionals to the four day event.   Picture1

WOW is specifically designed to advance the skills and knowledge of healthcare professionals specializing in wound care.  The educational sessions and hands-on workshops help them stay on top of ‘today’s standards of care’ and teaches the latest in wound care treatments and technologies.  “I  was  overwhelmed  by  the  outpouring  of  thanks  and  gratitude  from  the attendees,” said Nancy Morgan, Cofounder of WCEI and WOW.

This conference appropriately themed “Skin is in” was held at the Rio Hotel and Convention Center, September 17-20, 2014. Highlights of the conference included:

  • Close to 1,000 practicing nurses, therapist, physicians and industry professionals who influence wound care decisions from all care environments
  • 50+ basic to advanced educational sessions
  •  20 “How-To” and “Hands-On” programs
  • Renowned speakers and industry experts
  • Live certification courses include Skin and Wound Care, Diabetic Wound Care and Ostomy Management
  • Exhibitor partners
  • Clinical poster presentations
  • Wound Care Certified (WCC®) Outstanding Achievement and Scholarship Awards

WOW 2015

Next year’s WOW conference will be held September 2-5, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV.  If you are interested in receiving more details about WOW 2015 email WCEI at info@wcei.net.

 

About the Wound Care Education Institute

WCEI provides healthcare professionals with ongoing education support and comprehensive online and nationwide onsite courses in the fields of Skin, Wound, Diabetic and Ostomy Management. Health care professionals who meet the eligibility requirements may sit for the prestigious WCC®, DWC® and

OMS™ national board certification examinations through the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy® (NAWCO®).   Website: www.wcei.net

Wild On Wounds National Conference Brings Back the Maggots to Las Vegas!

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014
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This is just one of the sessions you can enjoy at our
National Wound Conference
Session 305 
HANDS ON:
Maggot Debridement Therapy
Dr. Ronald A. Sherman, M.D., M.Sc., D.T.M.H., Director, BioTherapeutics
We are pleased to welcome back Dr. Sherman, leading expert in maggot therapy and currently Chairman of the Board of Directors of the non-profit BioTherapeutics, Education and Research (BTER) Foundation, which supports patient care, education and research in maggot therapy and the symbiotic medicine.
Taught in two sessions, this course will give you the didactic and the practical hands on education on maggot therapy. Learn about the history, current status, mechanisms of action, as well as indications and contraindications for maggot therapy. Then put all that to use when you actually learn the technical aspects of maggot debridement therapy by applying live maggot dressings to mock wounds.
This session has limited seating and fills up fast so don’t wait.
 REGISTRATION INCLUDES:
  • 3 days filled with wound care education
  • 2 days of vendor showcase exhibits
  • Lunch all 3 days with a lunch speaker on day 3
  • Party poolside with a robust buffet and drinks!
  • Complimentary collectible event T-shirt
  • and MORE!

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“Footnotes on Selecting Diabetic Footwear”

Monday, January 28th, 2013

There are a lot of shoes out there, but not all of them would be appropriate selections for our diabetic patients.  In fact, selecting improper footwear could actually harm our diabetic patients and lead to diabetic foot ulcers and possible amputations.  Statistics show that 50% of amputations of our diabetic patients are directly related to improper footwear!amputation

Diabetic Wound Certified clinicians need to know how to check the footwear of our patients as well as the staff caring for our patients.  What are we looking for in a shoe for our diabetic patient?  The shoe should offer a firm snug fit.  The heel should be less than 1 inch, the greater the heel the greater the pressure on the ball of the foot and this could lead to callus formation and ulcerations.  The shoe should have laces, buckles or elastic to hold it in place.  When the diabetic is wearing slip on shoes the toes must curl to hold the shoe on and this can lead to calluses on the top of the toes and potential ulceration.  The shoe should have 1cm between the longest toe and the end of the shoe when the patient stands, we don’t want added pressure to the tips of the toes or on the toenails.  The sole of the shoe should be smooth without seams and cushioned to absorb shock and reduce pressure on the feet.  The shoe should be made from a material that “breathes”, avoid plastic and vinyl as they can encourage fungal infections.  The shoe should have a protective function; a closed toe shoe is imperative for our diabetic patient.  Look closely at the patients foot and the shoe – they should be the same shape, pointed toe shoes cause corns, calluses and ulcerations! Be sure the shoe width is appropriate, has a wide toe box that allow toes to move and accommodates any foot deformity.  The heel of the shoe should also be firm, you can check this by holding the sides of the heel of the shoe between your thumb and forefinger, try to push them together, if the heel compresses, its to soft and won’t give the patient good enough support when walking.

We also need to teach our patients and their family members instructions on checking for proper fit of their shoes and how to shop for new shoes.  They should be re-measured each time, shop late in the day, try on both shoes and walk around in them to ensure they are comfortable, be sure there is a thumbs width of space at the end of the longest toe, try the shoe on with the socks they will be wearing, be sure the heel is less than an inch, and be sure the shoe has laces or velcro closures.  If the patient has serious foot problems or deformities they should be referred for specially molded inserts and or shoes.

Following the above recommendations may just prevent a patient from developing a diabetic foot ulcer and an amputation!  Patient and caregiver education is a key factor in preventing diabetic foot ulcers!

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