Archive for the ‘Clinical – Wound Types’ Category

COVID-19 Complicates Skin and Wound Care

Thursday, July 7th, 2022

The pandemic has brought skin and wound care challenges on many levels. One challenge is that COVID-19 can compromise the skin, leading to wounds that are harder to heal, according to Dianna Dashner, DNP, WCC, CLNC, LLE, senior nurse practitioner at ProMedica Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation.

SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause virus-mediated endothelial dysfunction, which decreases tissue tolerance, authors wrote in a paper published in the summer 2022 issue of AACN Advanced Critical Care.

Dashner said the body’s inflammatory markers remain high long after an infected person’s symptoms go away.

“Inflammation markers actually take one year from the time you’ve been infected to go back to normal. So for patients who have an autoimmune disease or an inflammatory process in their bodies from a condition they already have, their markers are going to be sky high,” said Dashner, who is presenting “COVID’s Impact on the Skin: A Look at What We Know” at the September Wild on Wounds conference in Hollywood, Florida. The conference explores skin and wound care challenges and provides hands-on learning opportunities.

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Spotting Signs of Wound Infection is the First Step in Proper Treatment

Tuesday, May 31st, 2022

Understanding the most current literature describing stages and signs of wound infection helps clinicians to accurately assess wounds.

“If we allow wounds to become infected then it certainly impedes the healing process,” said Patricia A. Slachta, PhD, RN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, co-director of the Wound Care Nurse Education Program at Relias.

With an accurate assessment, wound care clinicians can prevent infection or identify signs of wound infection early and allow the body to heal the wound as quickly as possible, without using antibiotics, according to Slachta, who shared her expertise on how to determine if a wound is infected and needs antibiotic treatment.

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Wild on Wounds (WOW) Is Back and Better Than Ever

Monday, April 4th, 2022

Over the last two years, wound care clinicians have been among the many brave, dedicated souls out there providing the best care possible for their patients — in the face of seemingly endless adversity. It’s impossible to overstate the magnitude of what you’ve all been through.

These are among the many reasons the Wound Care Education Institute staff is so excited about this year’s Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference. The mere notion of meeting face to face after so long apart is truly a reason to celebrate.

For those unaware, Wild on Wounds is an annual conference with workshops and curriculum designed to be relevant for wound care clinicians practicing at every level of skin and wound management. It’s an opportunity to learn, network, discover what’s new in wound care, and of course, have a great time.

In partnership with the National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy (NAWCO), this year’s event is being held September 7-10 in sunny Hollywood, Florida. Buying your ticket by April 30 saves you $100, so register early. There are seven tiers of entry to choose from, so take a look at the site to see everything we’re offering this year.

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 All About the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Injury Risk

Monday, February 14th, 2022

As we shifted from “turning Q 2 hours” for positioning our patients to “individualized positioning based on tissue tolerance,” many clinicians were unsure how best to establish a plan of care.

How do we determine the positioning frequency? What is the pressure injury risk for our patients? How can we quantify risk to drive plan of care for positioning?

The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer/Sore Risk is a great tool to assist with those questions.

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Treating Pediatric Burns Takes Skills and Sensitivity

Saturday, December 11th, 2021

Knowledgeable wound care clinicians are needed not only for adults but for the pediatric population too. Burns are common injuries incurred by children. We spoke with two experts to learn more about this important area of wound care for pediatric burns.

Stats on Pediatric Burns

“Burns are a leading cause of death and disability for children worldwide,” said Tina Palmieri MD, FACS, FCCM, Assistant Chief of Burns at Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California and Burn Division Chief at the University of California, Davis.

In the U.S., the stats are staggering. “Nearly each week in 2018 in the U.S. alone, approximately six children aged 0-19 died, 139 were hospitalized, and 1,762 were taken to the emergency room due to fire and burn injuries,” said Palmieri.

According to the American Burn Association Fact Sheet, 24% of all burn injuries occur in children under the age of 15, said Jenna Leach MSN, RN, WCC, plastic surgery specialty nurse at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware.

Palmieri pointed out risk factors for pediatric fire and burn deaths are: (more…)

How Do You Treat a Malignant Wound? Let’s Look at the Options

Monday, November 8th, 2021

Wounds can present in patients as a result of various etiologies. One cause of wounds not typically on most clinicians’ radars are wounds that result from primary tumors.

We spoke with Joni Brinker, MSN/MHA, RN, WCC, an Ohio-based consultant and clinical nurse educator with Optum Hospice Pharmacy Services of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and speaker for WCEI’s Wild on Wounds (WOW) national conference, to gain insight on malignant wounds that can develop from primary tumors.

What Is a Malignant Wound?

“A malignant wound is a manifestation of malignant (cancerous) cells that have infiltrated through the skin,” said Brinker.

Other structures such as blood and lymphatic vessels also can be invaded by malignant cells and produce wounds, she said.

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Pediatric Patients Require Special Wound Care

Tuesday, September 21st, 2021

Pediatric patients with chronic and acute wounds need caregivers who are well-versed in wounds and in young patients’ unique needs. We spoke with three pediatric wound care experts to learn more about the most common wounds seen in kids, their etiologies, treatments, and recommendations for making dressing changes less traumatic.

 Acute Wounds Seen in Pediatric Patients

Pediatric patients can need treatment for a wide range of wounds. In fact, the list is quite extensive, according to experts.

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Unpacking the Fundamentals of Burn Wounds

Wednesday, August 25th, 2021

As a wound care clinician, you may be called to work in a burn unit or be consulted on burn wounds. If that is not your normal work setting, it can be overwhelming.

Our purpose in this article is to address the fundamentals and provide a solid working knowledge of how to manage burn wounds.

Let’s start with terminology. The American Burn Association changed the classification of burns from the traditional first-, second-, third-, and fourth-degree burns to the following:

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A Look at the UT and Wagner Scale Diabetic Foot Ulcer Classification Systems

Thursday, August 19th, 2021

Given the fact that DFUs occur in approximately 15% of patients with diabetes and there are more than 34 million people in the U.S. with diabetes, using a relevant diabetic foot ulcer classification system for patients is essential.

There are several diabetic wound classification systems. But how do you choose which one to use?

This decision generally involves clinician preference along with the organization’s policy.

Two wound care specialists provide an overview of two systems for DFU classification: The Wagner Scale and the University of Texas (UT) Diabetic Wound Classification System.

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Fungal Wound Infections: Identification, Treatment, and More

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2020

Some clinicians generally think of bacteria as the sole pathogen for chronic wounds.

But another culprit to consider when dealing with delayed wound healing is the presence of fungi that lead to fungal wound infection.

Romney Humphries, Ph.D., ABMM, professor and medical director of clinical microbiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, shared her expertise on fungal wounds.

“Wound infections caused by fungi occur when wounds are contaminated with spores,” Humphries said.

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