Pressure Injuries posts
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Pressure Injuries and Medical Device Dilemmas

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Medical device-related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) are a standard part of wound care, but preventative practices can make a big difference. One of the first things clinicians learn about treating pressure injuries is to find the cause of the pressure and simply remove it. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But what do you do when the cause […]

Wound Care Myths: 5 More Debunked

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

Whether it involves heel protectors, anti-embolism stockings, or letting wounds “breathe,” there are still plenty of wound-care myths circulating out there. Ready for the truth? You can handle it. Do you use wet-to-dry dressings in order to save money? Have you administered oral antibiotics to treat infected wounds? And do you follow physicians’ orders for […]

Pressure Injuries with Cartilage? Stage Away

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

When it comes to wound care, staging pressure injuries with visible or palpable cartilage doesn’t have to be complicated. Here’s what to do.   If you’ve ever treated wounds around the ear or in the area just below the bridge of the nose, you know how very little subcutaneous tissue there is. As a result, […]

Pressure Injury (Ulcer) Staging: More Real-World Answers

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

More real-world wound care questions and answers relating to pressure injury staging, including slough, debridement and skin breakdown. Can’t get enough of pressure injury staging? Neither can we. That’s why we’re excited to present even more questions and answers about this topic, based on what wound clinicians experience out in the field (versus what we […]

Real World Pressure Injuries: Staging Can Be Tricky

By Keisha Smith, MA, CWCMS

This wound care Q&A answers five of the most common questions about pressure injury staging dilemmas (that you probably didn’t learn from textbooks). In the world of wound care, just as in real life, the phrase, “Expect the unexpected” couldn’t be more appropriate. Clinicians can do everything exactly by the book, only to find that […]

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