Archive for the ‘Wound assessment’ Category

Explore when to use a collagen wound dressing on your patients

Wednesday, September 9th, 2020
collagen wound dressing

As wound care certified (WCC) clinicians, you should be aware of the types of dressings available to treat patients in your care.

Wound care dressings come in various shapes, sizes and have indications for their use, including collagen wound dressings.

Let’s explore which types of dressings are focused on collagen.

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Wound temperature can affect the wound healing process

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020
wound temperature

A patient’s core body temperature must be above 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit and below 107.6 for wound healing to occur.

The loss of moisture from any surface by evaporation is accompanied by cooling of the surface. So, as wound tissues lose moisture, a cooling effect occurs resulting in lower wound temperature.

Even a decrease of only 2 degrees Celsius is sufficient enough to affect the biological healing process of your patients. This is because cells and enzymes function optimally only at normal body temperature.

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TIMERS wound care: Strategies for wound bed preparation

Wednesday, July 29th, 2020
TIMERS wound care

Whether you’ve been in wound care for many years, or are a newcomer to the field, you have likely heard the terms TIME and maybe TIMERS.

The two words are acronyms pertaining to clinical categories related to comprehensive wound assessment, management and wound bed preparation for hard-to-heal wounds, said Donald Wollheim, MD, FAPWCA, WCC, DWC, a board-certified surgeon of the American Board of Surgery and clinical instructor with the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI).

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Learn how to determine what wound exudate is telling you

Wednesday, July 1st, 2020
wound exudate

An integral part of a wound assessment includes analyzing the type and amount of wound exudate coming from the wound.

Knowing how to correctly make those observations and documenting accordingly is critical to a comprehensive assessment. Ultimately, we want a wound with an optimal level of moisture to support healing and not an overly moist or dry environment.

However, as wound care specialists or experts, we need to take it one step further and ask a few more questions.

  • Is this the type and amount of drainage I expect to see based on the wound’s current healing path? 
  • If it is not, why is the exudate presenting this way? 
  • How do we correct that? 

A good wound care clinician does more than just make observations and note them. They are continually critically thinking and asking “why” and seeking solutions. 

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Telewound sessions: Best practices when conducting virtual appointments

Wednesday, June 24th, 2020
Telewound

With the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth and telewound services are in high demand.

For many wound care clinicians, providing telewound services may be a new addition to their practice.

We spoke with two telewound experts to help you learn more about best practices and possible glitches when conducting a telewound session.

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How to differentiate stasis dermatitis from cellulitis

Wednesday, May 6th, 2020
stasis dermatitis

In my experience, I have encountered the confusion between venous dermatitis and cellulitis that plagues the wound care industry. 

The unlikely diagnosis of “bilateral cellulitis” is not uncommon in wound care, followed by two weeks of unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

Despite some similarities, there are many differentiating characteristics that diagnosing clinicians either overlook or misunderstand. 

In an effort to help clinicians more accurately differentiate the two conditions, we will discuss the differences in this blog post. It will help you prescribe appropriate treatments and improve patient outcomes.

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How to teach patients to manage wound care at home during COVID-19

Monday, April 20th, 2020
wound care at home

Some wound care centers are closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

More patients are opting to perform their own wound care at home because they are concerned about venturing out and risking exposure to the virus.

We spoke with three wound care professionals to learn more about care provided in the home and teaching patients and families to care for wounds until life returns to normal. 

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Wipe Out Wounds Tour explores updated NPIAP Guideline

Wednesday, April 15th, 2020
NPIAP Guideline

NOTE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and concerns for the health and safety of our attendees, sponsors and instructors, the 2020 Wipeout Wounds Tour is being rescheduled for 2021, with our first sessions scheduled for the spring. To view current dates and information on the 2021 Wipeout Wounds National Conference Tour, please click here.

Are you aware of the new pressure injury guidelines?

The National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) and its partner organizations released the 2019 Clinical Practice Guideline for the prevention and treatment of pressure injuries.

The new NPIAP Guideline consists of a 409-page document. As a wound care clinician, you’ll be expected to integrate these current standards of care and pressure injury guidelines into your practice.

Donna Sardina, MHA, RN, WCC, CWCMS, DWC, OMS, co-founder of the Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI) and the Wild on Wounds (WOW) Conference, shared some highlights of the new guideline that you should know.

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COVID-19 pandemic: The potential impact on wound care

Tuesday, April 7th, 2020
COVID-19

COVID-19 is making quite a stir in our society at large.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared COVID-19 a global pandemic and many countries are being affected, some more severely than others. There is no doubt this viral outbreak is serious.

We have enough data to know the elderly and individuals with one or more significant health issues (diabetes, immunosuppression and/or upper respiratory comorbidities) are at the highest risk for serious illness and death.

What do you as wound care clinicians need to think about when managing your patients in hospitals, nursing homes and home care?

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An overview of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and wound care

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

Most wound care clinicians see wounds related to peripheral artery disease (PAD) on a frequent if not daily basis.

So let’s learn about PAD’s prevalence, understand the different ways it presents and best practices for managing it.

We spoke with Donald Wollheim, MD, FAPWCA, WCC, DWC, a board-certified surgeon of the American Board of Surgery, to get his insight on PAD.

With 25 years of experience in general/vascular surgery and 13 years as a wound care specialist, educator and case reviewer, Wollheim also is a clinical instructor for our Wound Care Education Institute (WCEI).

“From a wound care clinician’s point of view, it is critical to have good to excellent, oxygenated, arterial blood providing the tissues of the lower extremity to heal any wound of the leg,” Wollheim said.

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